STATE BY STATE

Unemployment Claims Processing Notes

( Click over map to view the information regarding each state. )

Select a state

Alabama
Agency Phone Number Website
Alabama Department of Labor 334-242-8025 https://labor.alabama.gov/uc/ICCS/

We would like all Covid-19 related separations to be marked as Lack of Work. The employer needs to add Covid-19 in the Additional Separation Information section.

Alabama unemployment benefits are available to individuals who are unemployed through no fault of their own. If an employer must shut down operations and no work is available, individuals may be eligible for unemployment benefits.
Alabama unemployment benefits are available to any individual who is unemployed through no fault of theirown. If an employer must lay off employees due to the loss of production caused by the coronavirus, individuals may be eligible for unemployment benefits.
In most cases, no. Unemployment benefits are available to individuals who are totally or partially unemployed due to no fault of their own. In this example, the individual—not the employer—is choosing not to work and, therefore, would be ineligible.
However, the facts of each circumstance are important. If the employer allowed this individual to telework, they would not qualify for benefits because they would not be unemployed. If the employer required the individual to stay home but did not offer telework, the individual might be eligible for benefits if they met the monetary and weekly eligibility criteria.
Yes, they will be eligible. Certain criteria and exceptions may apply, and are subject to change.
Yes, they will be eligible. Certain criteria and exceptions may apply, and are subject to change.
In some instances, yes. Please file a claim to determine eligibility.
Yes, they will be eligible. Certain criteria and exceptions may apply, and are subject to change.
The president of the United States has declared COVID-19 a national disaster, but at this time there has been no Disaster Unemployment Assistance declaration.
Proof of a medical diagnosis from a health care professional for the claimant and/or the immediate family member, and/or confirmation of quarantine by the employer or applicable government entity.
Generally, up to three weeks, subject to verification
No. In order to receive benefits, unemployment insurances taxes must be paid by the employer.
Employer charges will be waived to weeks claimed due to COVID-19 related issues until further notice. Employers are urged to file partial claims on their employees’ behalf, and/or to waive their right to respond to any Request for Separation information. More Info
At this time, no further guidance has been issued. Until such a time, normal procedures will be followed.
Please file here
A partial claim is filed when an employee is laid off for a short period, but is expected to be rehired at the same job. More Info
Alaska
Agency Phone Number Website
Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development 907-269-4700 https://my.alaska.gov/
Yes. The quickest way to file an unemployment insurance claim is through our online service which is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. You can file a claim Here
Alaska law requires UI benefits be paid by electronic funds transfer (Debit Card) or electronic payment to your personal checking or savings account (Direct Deposit.) You can set up direct deposit when you file a claim. You will need your 9 digit routing number and your account number. If you do not set up direct deposit you will be mailed a debit card within two weeks after you file a claim.
No. If you are working on-call, part-time, or on a temporary lay-off with your current employer, you have not “severed” the relationship with your employer. You are not required to voluntarily quit your job to be eligible for benefits.
You can file a claim and your eligibility will be reviewed. Working on-call or part-time does not automatically disqualify you from receiving unemployment insurance benefits. You will need to report any hours worked and earnings during each week you file for benefits if you worked that week.
You can file a claim and your eligibility will be reviewed. You will need to report any hours worked and earnings during each week you file for benefits if you worked that week.
You can file a claim and your eligibility will be reviewed.
You can file a claim and your eligibility will be reviewed.
Instruction from an employer, medical professional, or government official to stay home.
You can file a claim and your eligibility will be reviewed. If you are given a date when you can return to work you will be asked to provide the date on the application when you file a claim. You may be eligible for benefits during the time you are quarantined.
You can file a claim and your eligibility will be reviewed. If your employer has told you they do not have work for you due to a reduction in their workforce, or closure of business, you are considered to be laid off due to a lack of work and are potentially eligible for unemployment insurance benefits.
You can file a claim and your eligibility will be reviewed. You may need to contact Workers Compensation if you have questions about your eligibility for Workers Compensation benefits. Alaska Workers Compensation
Your requirements will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis. If you are asked to contact the UI claim center by a set deadline, you must still do so. If you are required to complete a Reemployment and Services Assessment through a job center, they are currently working on ways to accommodate alternative options, such as telephone and Skype.
You can file a claim and your eligibility will be reviewed.
This will be determined once you file a claim. You may not have to provide work search contacts depending on your circumstances.
No. The UI application requires that the individual provide a reason for separation, which could be working on-call, part-time, laid-off due to lack of work, voluntary quit, or discharge. The employer/employee relationship does not have to be severed for a claim to be valid.
Working on-call or part-time does not automatically disqualify employees from receiving unemployment insurance benefits. Employees will need to report any hours and earnings during each week they file for benefits if they work. Please instruct these employees to file an unemployment claim.
Employees working from home will need to report any hours worked and earnings each week they file for benefits if they are working from home. UI benefit payments may be reduced depending on the amount of hours and earnings reported.
Please instruct employees affected to file an unemployment claim. Employees will be required to provide the reason they are filing (reason for separation) when they complete the application.
If the employee is home sick or quarantined they are potentially eligible for benefits. If the employee is hospitalized their claim will need to be reviewed to determine eligibility.
They may not be eligible for UI benefits if you are paying them. If they file they will need to report all wages paid to them each week they file.
Arizona
Agency Phone Number Website
Arizona Department of Economic Security 1-877-600-2722 https://des.az.gov/services/employment/unemployment-individual/apply-ui-benefits

If the separation is due to COVID-19 mark the claim separation in Data Element B-20 as a code 18 “Disaster Related Separation” and include information in Data Element B-33 “EmployerSepReasonComments”.

If the worker is receiving any type of pay while off work, please also include that information in Data Elements B-26.1 through B-26.7 to ensure proper unemployment insurance eligibility is determined.

Earned paid sick time is leave time that is paid at the same hourly rate and with the same benefits, including health care benefits, that an employee would have received for the work hours during which earned paid sick time is used.
Accrued earned paid sick time includes the following:
  • Mental or physical illness, injury, or health condition of the employee or any of the employee’s family members.
  • Medical diagnosis, treatment, or care (including preventative medical care) associated with a mental or physical illness, injury, or health condition of the employee or any of the employee’s family members.
  • Closure of the employee’s place of business by order of a public official due to a public health emergency.
  • Employee’s need to care for a child whose school or place of care has been closed by order of a public official due to a public health emergency.
  • Care for oneself or a family member when it has been determined by the health authorities having jurisdiction or by a health care provider that the employee’s or family member’s presence in the community may jeopardize the health of others because of his or her exposure to a communicable disease, whether or not the employee or family member has actually contracted the communicable disease.
  • An absence due to domestic violence, sexual violence, abuse, or stalking involving the employee or any of the employee’s family members.
A “family member” includes the following:
  • Regardless of age, a biological, adopted or foster child, stepchild or legal ward, a child of a domestic partner, a child to whom the employee stands in loco parentis, or an individual to whom the employee stood in loco parentis when the individual was a minor; biological, foster, stepparent or adoptive parent or legal guardian of an employee or an employee's spouse or domestic partner or a person who stood in loco parentis when the employee or employee's spouse or domestic partner was a minor child;
  • A person to whom the employee is legally married under the laws of any state, or a domestic partner of an employee as registered under the laws of any state or political subdivision;
  • A grandparent, grandchild or sibling (whether of a biological, foster, adoptive or step relationship) of the employee or the employee's spouse or domestic partner; or
  • Any other individual related by blood or affinity whose close association with the employee is the equivalent of a family relationship.
A “public health emergency” means a state of emergency declared by the governor in which there is an occurrence or imminent threat of an illness or health condition caused by bioterrorism, an epidemic or pandemic disease or a highly fatal infectious agent or biological toxin and that poses a substantial risk of a significant number of human fatalities or incidents of permanent or long-term disability.
Yes. Governor Ducey issued a Declaration of Emergency and an Executive Order on March 11, 2020 related to COVID-19. The Declaration of Emergency and Executive Order were issued to provide health officials and administrators with tools and guidance necessary to combat the continued spread of COVID-19 and to reduce financial burdens on Arizonans by lowering healthcare costs associated with the virus. More Info
Yes, subject to applicable usage limitations.
Yes, subject to applicable usage limitations.
Yes, but only if the place of business was closed by order of a public official due to the COVID-19 public health emergency. Usage of earned paid sick time is subject to applicable usage limitations.
Yes, but only if the school has been closed by order of a public official due to a public health emergency. Because Governor Ducey has declared a public health emergency and ordered all public schools closed through March 27, 2020, employees may use accrued earned paid sick time to care for a child whose school has closed. Usage of earned paid sick time is subject to applicable usage limitations. More Info
Yes, but only if it has been determined by the health authorities having jurisdiction, or by a health care provider, that the employee’s or family member’s presence in the community may jeopardize the health of others because of his or her exposure to COVID-19 – whether or not the employee or family member has actually contracted COVID-19. Usage of earned paid sick time is subject to applicable usage limitations.
For employers with 15 or more employees: Employees are entitled to accrue one hour of earned paid sick time for every 30 hours worked, but employees are not entitled to accrue or use more than 40 hours of earned paid sick time per year, unless the employer selects a higher limit.

For employers with fewer than 15 employees: Employees are entitled to accrue one hour of earned paid sick time for every 30 hours worked, but they are not entitled to accrue or use more than 24 hours of earned paid sick time per year, unless the employer sets a higher limit.
An employee may use earned paid sick time as it is accrued or otherwise available for use. An employer may require an employee hired after July 1, 2017, to wait 90 calendar days after the start of employment before using accrued earned paid sick time. However, the Fair Wages and Healthy Families Act does not prevent an employer from waiving with the 90-day waiting period.
The Fair Wages and Healthy Families Act establishes the minimum requirements associated with earned paid sick time. Employers However, nothing in Arizona’s earned paid sick time laws, rules, or these FAQs should be construed to discourage or prohibit an employer from adopting an earned paid sick time policy that is more generous than that required by the Fair Wages and Healthy Families Act. Additionally, the provisions of the Fair Wages and Healthy Families Act do not diminish an employer’s obligation to comply with any contract, collective bargaining agreement, employment benefit plan, or other agreement that provides more generous paid sick time to an employee than that required by the Fair Wages and Healthy Families Act.

Consistent with recommendations from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, employers are encouraged to maintain flexible sick leave policies that are consistent with public health guidance and ensure that employees are aware of these policies. In the event an employee exhausts accrued earned paid sick timedue to circumstances associated with COVID-19, employees and employers are encouraged to discuss voluntary leave policies that are consistent with public health guidance and that meet the needs of Arizona’semployers and employees.
Yes, subject to the employer’s allowance of such practices.
Yes. Pursuant to Arizona Revised Statutes § 23-378, nothing in Arizona’s earned paid sick time laws should be construed to discourage or prohibit an employer from adopting an earned paid sick time policy that is more generous than that required by the Fair Wages and Healthy Families Act. Additionally, the provisions of the Fair Wages and Healthy Families Act do not diminish an employer’s obligation to comply with any contract, collective bargaining agreement, employment benefit plan, or other agreement that provides more generous paid sick time to an employee than that required by the Fair Wages and Healthy Families Act.

Consistent with recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, employers are encouraged to maintain flexible sick leave policies that are consistent with public health guidance and ensurethat employees are aware of these policies. Specifically, employers are encouraged to maintain flexible policies that permit employees to stay home if they contract COVID-19 or to care for a sick family member.
Pursuant to A.R.S. § 23-373(B), a request to use earned paid sick time may be made orally, in writing, by electronic means, or by any other means acceptable to the employer. When possible, the request to use earned paid sick time must include the expected duration of the absence. Employers are encouraged to be flexible with earned paid sick time requests related to COVID-19. When leave is not foreseeable, an employer may require an employee to follow a written policy that contains procedures for the employee to provide notice. An employer that has not provided to the employee a copy of its written policy for providing such notice may not deny earned paid sick time to the employee based on non-compliance with such a policy.
No
Yes, but only if an employee uses earned paid sick time on three or more consecutive work days. Consistent with recommendations from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, employers are encouraged not to require a healthcare provider’s note for employees who are sick with acute respiratory illness to validate their illness or to return to work, as healthcare provider offices and medical facilities may be extremely busy and not able to provide documentation in a timely way.
Employees who believe that their employer is violating the Fair Wages and Healthy Families Act may file a complaint with the Labor Department of the Industrial Commission or file a civil lawsuit. To file a complaint online concerning underpayment of earned paid sick time, click here. To file a claim in writing, send the completed claim form to:

Industrial Commission of Arizona
Labor Department
800 W Washington St.
Phoenix, AZ 85007

An administrative complaint concerning a minimum wage or earned paid sick time violation must be filed within one year of the date the wages were due. In addition, claims for retaliation, discrimination, or a violation of A.R.S. § 23-377 must be filed with the Labor Department of the Industrial Commission within one year from the date the alleged violation occurred or when the employee knew or should have known of the alleged violation.
No. The Fair Wages and Healthy Families Act prohibits an employer from discriminating or retaliating against an employee or other person for asserting any right under the Fair Wages and Healthy Families Act. Additionally, if an employer takes an adverse action against an employee within 90 days of the employee asserting a right under the Fair Wages and Healthy Families Act, retaliated against the employeewill be presumed. This presumption can be overcome if the employer shows by clear and convincing evidence that the action taken against the employee was for a permissible reason.

Employees who believe that their employer is violating the Fair Wages and Healthy Families Act may file a retaliation complaint with the Labor Department of the Industrial Commission or file a civil lawsuit. To file a complaint online concerning earned paid sick time retaliation, click here. To file a claim in writing, send the completed claim form to:

Industrial Commission of Arizona
Labor Department
800 W Washington St.
Phoenix, AZ 85007

The Fair Wages and Healthy Families Act does not define “adverse action.” Absent additional legislative or judicial guidance, the Industrial Commission will defer to established case law when determining whether an employee has been subjected to an adverse action.
On March 18, 2020, President Donald J. Trump signed the Families First Coronavirus Response Act into law. In addition to various other provisions, the Act requires employers with fewer than 500 employees to provide emergency paid sick leave and family leave to employees impacted by COVID-19. The new lawmakes all leave payments by employers fully reimbursable through tax credits. Employers of healthcare providers or emergency responders are permitted to exclude such employees from eligibility for paid sick and family leave. In addition, the U.S. Department of Labor is authorized to exempt small businesses with fewer than 50 employees in certain circumstances.

Paid Sick Leave – In general, the Act provides eligible full-time employees with ten days (80 hours) of paid sick leave when an employee cannot work or telework for circumstances related to COVID-19. Part-time employees are entitled to a number of hours of paid sick time equal to the number of hours they work, on average, over a two-week period. Paid sick leave applies to employees who: (1) are subject to a Federal, State, or local quarantine or isolation order related to COVID-19; (2) have been advised by a healthcare provider to self-quarantine due to concerns related to COVID-19; (3) are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 and seeking a medical diagnosis; (4) are caring for an individual subject to a quarantine order or self-quarantine; (5) are caring for a son or daughter if schools are closed or a child care provider is unavailable because of a public health emergency; or (6) are experiencing substantially similar conditions as those specified by the Secretary of Health and Human Services. Paid sick leave ispaid at the higher of: (a) the employee’s regular rate of pay, (b) the federal minimum wage, or (c) the State or local minimum wage, whichever is greater. For sick leave related to reasons (1), (2), and (3), above, payments are capped at $511 per day and $5,110 in the aggregate. For leave related to reasons (4), (5), and (6), above, payments are made at two-thirds of the rate of pay an employee would otherwise receive and are capped at $200 per day and $2,000 in the aggregate.

Paid Family Leave – In general, the Act provides twelve weeks of job-protected paid leave for an employee who is unable to work or telework because the employee needs to care for children (under the age of 18)due to school or daycare closure from a public health emergency related to COVID-19. Paid Family Leave only covers employees who have been working for at least 30 calendar days. Paid Family Leave is paid at two-thirds of the employee’s regular rate of pay after the first 10 days. However, an employee is permitted to use accrued vacation, personal, or sick leave during the first 10 days. Payments of Paid Family Leave are capped at $200 per day and $10,000 in the aggregate.

No. Because the Families First Coronavirus Response Act is was enacted by the United States Congress and signed by President Donald J. Trump, the law is administered and enforced at a federal level.
The statutory language of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act is available here. Questions related to the paid leave provisions of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act may be directed to the United States Department of Labor.
The paid sick leave provisions of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act are in addition to any sick leave that is already offered by employers, including earned paid sick time under the Fair Wages and Healthy Families Act. Employers are not permitted to require an employee to use other paid leave provided to an employee, including Arizona earned paid sick time, before the employee uses paid sick time under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act.
Arkansas
Agency Phone Number Website
Arkansas Department of Workforce Services 501-682-2121 https://www.ezarc.adws.arkansas.gov/
There are a multitude of ways to file for unemployment benefits:
  • Visit here and apply online.
  • Call 1-855-225-4440.
  • Effective Monday, March 23, 2020, a Temporary Claims Processing Hotline will be available for affected workers who require assistance in filing their unemployment claims. The Temporary Claims Processing Hotline can be reached at 1-844-908-2178 or 501-534-6304.
  • While not recommended, you may visit your nearest Arkansas Workforce Center office.
Yes. The unemployment insurance program is designed to assist workers who are laid off through no fault of their own, regardless of whether their separation from employment is the result of COVID-19 or some other factor impacting a business. Affected workers should be encouraged to file their unemployment insurance claims with the Arkansas Division of Workforce Services.
The regular unemployment insurance program is not available to self-employed individuals unless they have wages from other covered employment. At this time, Disaster Unemployment Assistance has not been authorized by the President. Should Disaster Unemployment Assistance become available, DWS will notify the public via our website, social media and press releases.
Yes, once you have received a separation notice from your employer an affected worker may file for unemployment insurance benefits due to COVID-19 related quarantine. DWS will investigate the reasons for your temporary separation. This investigation may result in a slight delay in receiving benefits.
You will need to file weekly claims to receive benefits, either by ArkNet or ArkLine. You will need to begin filing your weekly claims on the Sunday following the day that you filed your initial claim for unemployment benefits.
  • To file your claim using ArkNet, visit here. Follow the prompts and enter your answers for the questions that pertain to the dates outlined.
  • To file your claim using ArkLine, call (501) 907-2590. ArkLine is available for use on Sunday, 12:01 am to 6:00 pm, and Monday through Friday, 6:00 am to 6:00 pm. Follow the prompts and enter your answers for the questions that pertain to the dates indicated.
Remember to file your claim each week that you are unemployed to claim benefits!
For claims filed on or after March 16, 2020, the valid waiting period requirement has been waived for thirty (30) days due to the COVID-19 Pandemic. Therefore, claims that are “otherwise eligible,” should expect payment of benefits the following week. However, different situations may exist that could delay receipt of benefits.
  • If your claim requires adjudication, it will require investigation and a written determination will be issued to you regarding your eligibility for unemployment benefits.
  • If you have out of state wages, there may be a slight delay in receiving benefits if you file a combined wage claim, which is where you combine your wages from all states.
  • There may also be a slight delay for those whose claim is based on federal wages.
Benefits are issued either Direct Deposit or by Debit Card.
  • Direct Deposit requires you to have a personal checking account or savings account. Payment for Direct Deposit takes about 2-3 days from the date the payment is processed. To select Direct Deposit, you must enter your account and routing numbers after logging into your account here. Benefits will be deposited into your account when due, based upon your current eligibility and the weekly information you certify.
  • UI Debit Cards are issued to anyone who does not elect to receive UI benefits via Direct Deposit. These cards must be issued by a bank and mailed to you. Benefits will be deposited into your card account when due, based upon your current eligibility and the weekly information you certify. UI Debit Cards are convenient and easy and may be used wherever Visa is accepted.
Effective for claims filed on or after March 16, 2020, work search requirements have been waived for a period of thirty (30) days, or through the week ending April 18, 2020 due to the COVID-19 Pandemic. Therefore, you will not be required to register or search for work during the thirty (30) day waive period.

If you will only be unemployed due to a temporary reduction in workforce for a period of ten (10) weeks or less, it is recommended that your employer provide a letter to you with a specific return to work date that is within ten (10) weeks of your last dayof work. This letter will exempt you from work search and expedite the process.
Gross earnings (before any deductions) for all work performed for the week being claimed must be reported when filing your weekly claim for benefits. Also:
  • Report gross income earned by participating in military drill during the week being claimed –whether you have received payment or not.
  • Report gross Holiday Pay if you were off work for a holiday during the week being claimed –whether you have received payment or not.
  • Report gross Vacation Pay if you were off work on vacation during the week being claimed –whether you have received payment or not.
  • Report gross Sick Pay if you were off work on sick leave during the week being claimed –whether you have received paymentor not.
  • Report Paid Time Off (PTO) if you were off work on PTO during the week being claimed –whether you have received the PTO pay or not.
  • Report gross Bonus Pay for any bonus payment received during the week being claimed.
Also report any receipt ofretirement pay or separation pay to your local office –as this may affect your eligibility for unemployment benefits.
Claimants who are under a disqualification from receiving unemployment insurance benefits must satisfy any disqualification prior to receiving unemployment insurance benefits.
At this time, there are no federal or state extensions available to provide additional unemployment insurance benefits to individuals who have exhausted their unemployment insurance claims. Should such extensions become available, ADWS will notify potentially eligible claimantsthrough our website and social media.
Answers to most unemployment insurance questions can be found on our website. You may also contact your local office or call 1-855-225-4440.
Yes! The unemployment insurance program is designed to assist workers who are laid off through nofault of their own, regardless of whether their separation from employment is the result of COVID-19 or some other factor impacting a business. Affected workers should be encouraged by employers to file their unemployment insurance claims with the Arkansas Division of Workforce Services.
Generally, most individuals who are filing unemployment insurance claims arising from businesses impacted by COVID-19 will be eligible for benefits provided they meet the momentary and other eligibility requirements.
The regular unemployment insurance program is not available to self-employed individuals unless they have wages from other covered employment. At this time,Disaster Unemployment Assistance has not been authorized by the President. Should Disaster Unemployment Assistance become available, DWS will notify the public via the DWS website, social media and press releases.
Generally, religious organizations are exempt from contributing to the unemployment insurance program. As a result, their employees are considered not eligible for unemployment insurance benefits based on any wages paid by the religious organization.
Employees of religious organizations that also work for employers who contribute to the unemployment insurance program may be eligible for unemployment insurance benefits based on their wages from work performed for other businesses.
How much an affected worker will receive in unemployment insurance benefits is determined by the amount of wages earned in their base period. The base period is the first four of the last five completed quarters of employment. Arkansas’ weekly benefit amounts range from $81 to $451 per week.
If a business has a temporary reduction in its workforce for a period of 10 weeks or less, its workers will not be required to seek new employment. It is recommended that the business provide a letter to their workers with a specific return work date that is within 10 weeks of their last day of work. This letter will expedite the process. Affected workers should provide this letter to DWS.
It depends. DWS will continue to examine the reason for the separation from employment and, where appropriate, non-charge benefits within federal and state guidelines. In most cases, benefits paid as a result of a lay off, regardless of the reason, are charged to an employer’s DWS account.
An employer’s account is charged for all benefits paid to workers who were laid off. There is no provision to non-charge employer accounts for a lay off regardless ofthe reason.
In December 2019, all employers were sent their annual Rate Notice for CY2020. This notice informs them of their contribution rate, the taxable wage base, and their account reserve. Employers may also log into their DWS Tax21 account to view this information.
Tax 21 is available here.
The provisions of HR 6201 do not contain language to assist employers in addressing the impact of COVID-19 related to unemployment insurance claims and accounts. DWS will continue to monitor federal legislation impacting the unemployment insurance program.
Employers seeking information related to the DWS account may contact Employer Account Services at 501-682-3798.
California
Agency Phone Number Website
California Employment Development Department 1-800-300-5616 https://edd.ca.gov/Unemployment/Filing_a_Claim.htm
If you’re unable to work due to having or being exposed to COVID-19 and if you have the necessary supporting medical documentation, you are encouraged to file a Disability Insurance (DI) claim. DI provides short-term benefit payments to eligible workers who have a full or partial loss of wages due to a non-work-related illness, injury, or pregnancy. Most California workers are covered by DI through deductions from their paychecks (noted as “CASDI” on most paystubs).

The Governor’s Executive Order waives the one-week unpaid waiting period, so you can collect DI benefits for the first week you are out of work. If you are eligible, the EDD processes and issues payments within a few weeks of receiving a claim.
To be eligible for Disability Insurance (DI) benefits, you must submit certain medical documentation. This requirement can be met by a medical certification signed by a treating physician or a practitioner that includes a diagnosis and ICD-10 code, or if no diagnosis has been obtained, a statement of symptoms; the start date of the condition; its probable duration; and the treating physician’s or practitioner’s license number or facility information. This requirement can also be met by a written order from a state or local health officer that is specific to you.

For fastest processing of your claim, submit your claim online and have your supporting medical documentation submitted online immediately after.

You may also request that the EDD send you a Claim for Disability Insurance (DI) Benefits (DE 2501) (PDF) form, which can be ordered online and sent to you. Submit the completed form to the EDD using the envelope provided. If your medical documentation is provided in any other form other than EDD’s designated claim form, it should be submitted separately by mail to:

Employment Development Department
PO Box 10402
Van Nuys, CA 91410-0402

Benefit amounts are approximately 60-70 percent of wages (depending on income) and range from $50-$1,300 a week. The EDD provides a Disability Insurance Calculator to estimate your potential benefit amount. Disability benefits are paid through the date your doctor certifies or when you exhaust your available benefits, whichever comes first within a 52-week period.

The Governor’s Executive Order waives the one-week unpaid waiting period, so you can collect DI benefits for the first week you are out of work. If you are eligible, the EDD processes and issues payments within a few weeks of receiving a claim.
Yes, if your quarantine is certified by a medical professional or a state or local health officer. If you are not found eligible for DI, you are encouraged to apply for an Unemployment Insurance (UI) claim.
If you’re unable to work because you are caring for an ill or quarantined family member with COVID-19, you are encouraged to file a Paid Family Leave (PFL) claim. PFL provides up to six weeks, this extends to eight weeks starting July 1, 2020, of benefit payments to eligible workers who have a full or partial loss of wages because they need time off work to care for a seriously ill family member or to bond with a new child. For the purposes of PFL coverage, a family member is defined as seriously ill child, parent, parent-in-law, grandparent, grandchild, sibling, spouse, or registered domestic partner.
To be eligible for PFL benefits, you must submit certain medical documentation regarding the family member in your care who is either ill or quarantined due to COVID-19. This requirement can be met by a medical certification for that person from a treating physician or a practitioner that includes a diagnosis and ICD-10 code, or if no diagnosis has been obtained, a statement of symptoms; the start date of the condition; its probable duration; and the treating physician’s or practitioner’s license number or facility information. This requirement can also be met by a written order from a state or local health officer that is specific to your family member’s situation. Absent those documents from a physician or health officer, you may be eligible for an Unemployment Insurance (UI) claim instead.

For fastest processing of your claim, submit your claim online and have the supporting medical documentation submitted online immediately after.

You may also request that the EDD send you a Claim for Paid Family Leave (PFL) Benefits (DE 2501F) (PDF) form, which can be ordered online and sent to you. Submit the completed form to the EDD using the envelope provided. If your medical documentation is provided in any other form other than the EDD’s designated claim form, it should be submitted separately by mail to:

Employment Development Department
PO Box 45011
Fresno, CA 93718-5011

Benefit amounts are approximately 60-70 percent of wages (depending on income) and range from $50-$1,300 a week. You can use the Paid Family Leave Calculator to help estimate your potential benefit amount.

If you are eligible, the EDD processes and issues payments within a few weeks of receiving a claim.
If you are self-employed, you may have benefits available from the EDD employment insurance programs that you or your employer may have paid into over the past 5 to 18 months. You may have contributions from a prior job, or it’s possible you may have been misclassified as an independent contractor instead of an employee.

We encourage you to file a Disability Insurance (DI) claim if you are sick or quarantined. If you are caring for an ill or medically quarantined family member, file a Paid Family Leave claim. Our EDD representatives will review your case and determine your eligibility for benefits. For fastest processing of your claim, submit your claim online.

You may also be eligible for benefits if you pay into Disability Insurance Elective Coverage (DIEC). DIEC is an option for self-employed people (such as independent contractors) and employers to apply for coverage under State Disability Insurance (SDI). This includes school district and state employees who are exempt from SDI, but can negotiate to participate in the DIEC. Visit Self-Employed/Independent Contractor to learn more.
You may have benefits available through other insurance programs that your employer have paid into in the past 5 to 18 months. California law allows your employer to offer you a Voluntary Plan option instead of the SDI program. You should check with your employer’s personnel or benefits office about filing a Disability Insurance or Paid Family Leave.

You also may have contributions from a prior job in the past 5 to 18 months, or it’s possible you may have been misclassified as an independent contractor instead of an employee.
You are encouraged to apply for Unemployment Insurance (UI) benefits if you are unemployed, which includes reasons such as:
  • Your hours are reduced due to the quarantine.
  • You were separated from your employer during the quarantine.
  • You are subject to a quarantine required by a medical professional or state or local health officer.
You can be eligible for benefits if you have enough earnings over the past 12-18 months and meet other eligibility criteria. The Governor’s Executive Order waives the one-week unpaid waiting period, so you can collect UI benefits for the first week you are out of work. If you are eligible, the EDD processes and issues payments within a few weeks of receiving a claim.

EDD representatives may need to set up a phone interview with you to collect more details.
  • If you are temporarily out of work and plan to return to the same employer, you do not need to meet the usual requirement of looking for work while you are collecting unemployment benefits. The EDD will inform you if you are not required to look for work each week.
  • If you are not connected to a certain employer with a job to return to, you are required to look for work while collecting benefits. Looking for work can be done from home including using online channels, mailing job applications, calling about job openings, registering in CalJOBSSM (the state’s online labor exchange system), etc. The EDD will inform you if you are required to look for work each week.
If you are self-employed and unable to work or have had your hours reduced due to COVID-19, you may be eligible for Unemployment Insurance (UI) benefits under a few different scenarios:
  • You chose to contribute to UI Elective Coverage and paid the required contributions to be considered potentially eligible for benefits.
  • our past employer made contributions on your behalf over the past 5 to 18 months.
  • You may have been misclassified as an independent contractor instead of an employee.
You could be eligible for unemployment benefits. Our EDD representatives will seek details from you to determine eligibility based on the reason you are unemployed and the reason for restricting your availability to work. You may be required to actively seek work each week to show that you are still making yourself available for work. The work search could include looking for work through online channels, mailing job applications, calling about job openings, registering in CalJOBSSM (the state’s online job exchange system), etc.
You may be eligible for unemployment benefits. Our EDD representatives will determine eligibility on a case-by-case basis by scheduling a phone interview with you. For example, you may be eligible for unemployment benefits if your employer has temporarily allowed you to work less than full-time hours due to your child care situation. In such case, you may be eligible for reduced benefits based on the amount of your weekly earnings, as long as you meet all other eligibility requirements. The EDD will contact you and your employer for information to determine your eligibility.
You may be eligible for unemployment benefits. Our EDD representatives will determine eligibility on a case-by-case basis by scheduling a phone interview with you.
If your employer reduced your hours or shut down operations due to COVID-19, you are encouraged to file an Unemployment Insurance (UI) claim. UI provides partial wage replacement benefit payments to workers who lose their job or have their hours reduced, through no fault of their own. Workers who are temporarily unemployed due to COVID-19 and expected to return to work with their employer within a few weeks are not required to actively seek work each week. However, they must remain able, available, and ready to work during their unemployment for each week of benefits claimed and meet all other eligibility criteria.
Eligible individuals can receive benefits that range from $40-$450 per week. Depending on your maximum award for your UI claim and your weekly benefit amounts paid, the number of weeks you can potentially receive benefit payments ranges from 13 to 26 weeks if you are paid at your full weekly benefit amount for each of those weeks. Your payments could stretch to a longer duration if you perform some work for pay or if you receive other deductible income during the course of a claim, and you receive reduced unemployment benefits as a result during those weeks.

You can use the Unemployment Insurance Calculator to help estimate your potential weekly benefit amount.

The Governor’s Executive Order waives the one-week unpaid waiting period, so you can collect UI benefits for the first week you are out of work. If you are eligible, the EDD processes and issues payments within a few weeks of receiving a claim.
Working your full normal hours remotely would not qualify you for benefits. However, you could collect some Unemployment Insurance benefits if your usual number of work hours are reduced through no fault of your own. The first $25 or 25 percent of your wages, whichever is the greater amount, is not counted as wages earned and will not be reduced from your UI weekly benefit amount. For example, if you earned $100 in a week, the Department would not count $25 as wages and would only deduct $75 from your weekly benefit amount. For someone who has a weekly benefit amount of $450, they would be paid a reduced amount of $375.
You have the right to apply and file a claim for unemployment and disability benefits at the same time, but you can only collect payments under one benefit program at a time. You’re encouraged to file a claim under one program based on your circumstances or file under both programs if you are unsure of which program is most appropriate. The EDD will review the facts and determine your eligibility for the appropriate program.
Yes. If your employer shuts down operations or reduces hours for workers while you are on your disability claim, you may apply for unemployment benefits at that time. The EDD will help determine the start of your Unemployment Insurance claim as long as you meet all other eligibility requirements.
Yes. If you become sick while you are out of work, you can apply for a disability claim, which can provide a higher benefit amount if you’re eligible. A medical certification is required to substantiate your illness. If you are approved for a Disability Insurance claim, your Unemployment Insurance (UI) claim will be suspended. If you recover but remain unemployed, you may then return to the remainder of your UI claim benefits as long as you remain out of work and are otherwise eligible. You will need to reapply to reopen your UI claim.
Yes. If you have a family member who becomes sick while you are out of work, you can apply for a Paid Family Leave claim which can provide a higher benefit amount if you’re eligible. A medical certification is required to substantiate your family member’s illness. If you are approved for a Paid Family Leave claim, your Unemployment Insurance (UI) claim will be suspended. If you complete your Paid Family Leave claim and remain unemployed, you may then return to the remainder of your UI claim benefits as long as you remain out of work and otherwise eligible. You will need to reapply to reopen your UI claim.
If COVID-19 has impacted your business or services, you can avoid potential layoffs by participating in the Unemployment Insurance (UI) Work Sharing Program. This program allows you to retain your workers by reducing their hours and wages no more than 60 percent and partially offsetting the wage loss with UI benefits. This helps you avoid the cost of recruiting, hiring, and training new workers and helps your workers keep their jobs and receive some financial support with UI benefits. You and your workers can also be prepared to quickly adjust when business improves.
Your workers can file for unemployment benefits as long as they are unemployed and otherwise eligible. Workers who expect to return to work for you within a few weeks are not required to actively seek work each week as long as they are able and available to return to work during their unemployment and meet all other eligibility criteria. The EDD will explain the requirements to your workers when they apply for benefits.
If you are facing potential layoffs or plant closures, you can get help through the Rapid Response program. Rapid Response teams will meet with you to discuss your needs, help avoid layoffs where possible, and support your workers through the process. Services can include upgrades to current worker skills, customized training, career counseling, job search assistance, help with filing unemployment insurance claims, and information about education and training opportunities. For more information, refer to Rapid Response Services for Businesses Fact Sheet (DE 87144RRB) (PDF). You can also contact your local America’s Job Center of California for more information about available Rapid Response services.
With the Governor’s emergency declaration, if your business is directly affected by COVID-19, you can request up to a 60-day extension to file your state payroll reports and deposit state payroll taxes without penalty or interest. The written request for extension, noting the impact of COVID-19, must be received within 60 days from the original delinquent date of the payment or return. For the address to send the request, along with other information, please see the State of Emergency or Disaster Fact Sheet (DE 231SED) (PDF).

You can also call the EDD Taxpayer Assistance Center with any questions you may have about your payroll tax responsibilities.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Guidance for Business and Employers includes basic precautions like proper handwashing and cleaning, as well as making sure your sick leave policies are flexible and consistent with public health guidance. Visit Cal/OSHA Guidance on Coronavirus to learn more about workplace requirements.
Colorado
Agency Phone Number Website
Colorado Department of Labor and Employment 303-318-9000 https://www.colorado.gov/cdle/unemployment
The Act was signed into law on March 18, 2020 and takes effect April 2, 2020. This Act is in response to the COVID-19 outbreak. The information provided below summarizes some of the key provisions impacting employers.
Employees of employers with fewer than 500 employees, who have been on the job for at least 30 days, have a right to take job-protected leave under FMLA for up to 12 weeksif they meet the following condition:
  • They are caring for a child (under the age of 18) if the school or place of care for the child has been closed, or the childcareprovider of the child is unavailable, due to COVID-19 precautions.
  • The first 10 days of leave maybe unpaid, though an employee could choose to use accrued vacation days, personal leave, or other available paid leave for unpaid time off. Following the 10-day period, employees would receive a benefit from their employers that will be at least two-thirds of their normal pay rate.
  • The family leave pay is capped at $200 per day and $10,000 in total.
  • Employers of health care providers or emergency responders may elect out of providing paid family leave to these employees.
  • Employers generally need to restore an employee to the position held or its equivalent when the employee returns from leave; however, an exception exists for employers with fewer than 25 employees if certain conditions are met.
  • The U.S. Department of Labor has authority to exempt from the paid family leave requirement employers with fewer than 50 employees if the requirement to provide leave would jeopardize the viability of the business.
Employers with fewer than 500 employees must provide employees with two weeks of paid sick leave that is:
  • Paid at the employee’s regular rate if (in connection with COVID-19) the employee:
    • is subject to a quarantine or isolation order;
    • has been advised to self-quarantine;
    • is experiencing symptoms; or,
  • Paid at two-thirds the employee’s regular rate if (in connection with COVID-19) the employee:
    • is on leave to care for an individual who is subject to an isolation order or who is a quarantined employee; or
    • is on leave to care for a child (under the age of 18)if the school or place of care for the child has been closed or the childcareprovider of the child is unavailable, due to COVID-19 precautions.
  • Full-time employees can receive up to 80 hours of sick leave, while part-time employees are eligible for leave based on their scheduled or normal work hours in a two-week period.
  • Paid sick leave is calculated based on the employee’s regular compensation but is capped at $511 per day for employees who fall into the first three categories above and at $200 per day for those in the two care-related categories.
  • Employers of health care providers or emergency responders mayelect out of providing paid family leave to these employees.
  • Paid sicktime does not carry over from one year to the next.
  • Employers cannot require employees to find a replacement to cover the hours during which the employee is using paid sick time.
  • The U.S. Department of Labor has broad authority under this Act to exempt from the paid family leave requirement employers with fewer than 50 employees if the requirement to provide leave would jeopardize the viability of the business.
  • Employers that already have existing paid leave policies must also provide employees with this emergency paid sick timeand cannot requireemployee use other paid leave provided before using this paid sick leave.
  • Employers are required to provide notice, a model of which will be provided by the U.S. Department of Labor.
  • Employers may not discharge, discipline or in any other manner discriminate against an employee who takes leave under the Act or who has filed a complaint or instituted any proceedings under or related to the Act, or who has testified or is about to testify in any proceedings under or related to the Act.
  • An employer could be subject to civil penalties for a violation of paid sick leave requirements.
The U.S. Department of Labor has indicated it will be providing further guidance on how employers can comply with the Act. We will be updating this pagewith additional resourcesas information becomes available.
Undetermined at this point pending federal proposal and proposed emergency rules.
Yes, employees whose hours have been reduced can file for unemployment benefits. Yes, any benefits paid will be charged to your account.
I work part time and my employer reduced hours to zero for the next 30 days.

Yes, if you are working fewer than 32 hours a week and earning less than the weekly amount of unemployment benefits pay (approximately 55 percent of your average wage over a 12-month time period), you may receive unemployment benefits.

I work for a ski resort who closed for one week

Yes. If you are not working, you can file a claim (or reopen a claim you filed in the last 12 months if money remains on the claim). If you file a new claim, you must serve one unpaid waiting week before any payments can be issued. However, a claim is active for one year (52 weeks), and you may be paid unemployment benefits for any weeks you are unemployed in the next year.

I work for an entertainment venue full time and my hours were reduced

Yes, if you are working fewer than 32 hours a week and earning less than the weekly amount that unemployment benefits pay (approximately 55 percent of your average wage over a 12-month time period), you may receive unemployment benefits.

I tested positive for COVID-19 and am quarantined for 14 days

Undetermined at this point pending federal proposal and proposed emergency rules.

I have flu-like symptoms and my employer asked me to self quarantine

Undetermined at this point pending federal proposal and proposed emergency rules.

My employer laid off all employees

Yes. If you are not working, you can file a claim (or reopen a claim you filed in the last 12 months if money remains on the claim). If you file a new claim, you must serve one unpaid waiting week before any payments can be issued.

To file a claim, please click here.
It may take as little as 2 weeks but as many as 6 to complete the processing, depending on how many employers are a part of the claim. The first eligible week is an unpaid waiting week before any payments can be issued.
Unemployment benefits are approximately 55 percent of a person's average weekly wage over a 12-month time period. Estimate your potential payments.
For unemployment insurance, you may still receive partial benefits if you are working fewer than 32 hours a week and earning less than the weekly unemployment benefit amount. You must report all hours worked and earnings, including tips, for the hours worked when you request payment of unemployment benefits.
A link to other resources CDLE refers our customers: More Info
Connecticut
Agency Phone Number Website
Connecticut Department of Labor - http://www.ctdol.state.ct.us/UI-OnLine/
It is important to file as soon as you become unemployed to avoid being denied benefits. Do not delay filing your claim for unemployment benefits even if your employer has not issued you any paperwork.

To file your claim, please click here.

For faster processing of your claim, please have your employer’s registration number and a return to work date readily available when you file your claim online.

If you have any questions, please visit the CT Department of Labor Online Assistance Center. You may also submit your general question dol.webhelp@ct.gov. A response can be expected in 3 to 5 business days, depending on volume.
You may file for unemployment benefits and a determination will be made concerning your eligibility. Determinations will be made on a case-by-case basis. However, please note that an individual must be physically able and available for full time work in order to qualify for unemployment benefits (unless the individual has a note from a physician stating that the individual is only available for part time work).

To file your claim, please click here.
  • For faster processing of your claim, please have your employer’s registration number and a return to work date readily available when you file your claim online.
  • Your employer should provide you with an Unemployment Separation Package, found here, but do not delay filing if you do not have it.
If you have any questions, please visit the CT Department of Labor Online Assistance Center. You may also submit your general question to dol.webhelp@ct.gov. A response can be expected in 3 to 5 business days, depending on volume.
You may file for unemployment benefits and a determination will be made concerning your eligibility. Determinations will be made on a case-by-case basis. However, please note that an individual must be physically able and available for full time work in order to qualify for unemployment benefits (unless the individual has a note from a physician stating that the individual is only available for part time work).

To file your claim, please click here.
  • For faster processing of your claim, please have your employer’s registration number and a return to work date readily available when you file your claim online.
  • Your employer should provide you with an Unemployment Separation Package, found here, but do not delay filing if you do not have it.
If you have any questions, please visit the CT Department of Labor Online Assistance Center. You may also submit your general question to dol.webhelp@ct.gov. A response can be expected in 3 to 5 business days, depending on volume.
You may file for unemployment benefits and a determination will be made concerning your eligibility. Determinations will be made on a case-by-case basis.

To file your claim, please click here.
  • For faster processing of your claim, please have your employer’s registration number and a return to work date readily available when you file your claim online.
  • Your employer should provide you with an Unemployment Separation Package, found here, but do not delay filing if you do not have it.
If you have any questions, please visit the CT Department of Labor Online Assistance Center. You may also submit your general question to dol.webhelp@ct.gov. A response can be expected in 3 to 5 business days, depending on volume.
You may file for unemployment benefits and a determination will be made concerning your eligibility. Determinations will be made on a case-by-case basis.

To file your claim, please click here.
  • For faster processing of your claim, please have your employer’s registration number and a return to work date readily available when you file your claim online.
  • Your employer should provide you with an Unemployment Separation Package, found here, but do not delay filing if you do not have it.
If you have any questions, please visit the CT Department of Labor Online Assistance Center. You may also submit your general question to dol.webhelp@ct.gov. A response can be expected in 3 to 5 business days, depending on volume.
If you are not currently employed, and are unable to work, you are most likely ineligible for Unemployment Insurance until you are able to work. However, you may file for unemployment benefits and a determination will be made concerning your eligibility. Determinations will be made on a case-by-case basis.

To file your claim, please click here.

If you have any questions, please visit the CT Department of Labor Online Assistance Center. You may also submit your general question to dol.webhelp@ct.gov. A response can be expected in 3 to 5 business days, depending on volume.
You should file for benefits as you may be eligible for partial unemployment.

Please note: when working and filing, all hours and gross earnings must be reported. A portion of your gross earnings will be deducted from your weekly benefit rate. Determinations will be made on a case-by-case basis.

To file your claim, please click here.

  • For faster processing of your claim, please have your employer’s registration number and a return to work date readily available when you file your claim online.
  • Your employer should provide you with an Unemployment Separation Package, found here, but do not delay filing if you do not have it.
If you have any questions, please visit the CT Department of Labor Online Assistance Center. You may also submit your general question to dol.webhelp@ct.gov. A response can be expected in 3 to 5 business days, depending on volume.
You should file for benefits as you may be eligible for partial unemployment.

Please note: when working and filing, all hours and gross earnings must be reported. A portion of your gross earnings will be deducted from your weekly benefit rate. Determinations will be made on a case-by-case basis.

To file your claim, please click here.

  • For faster processing of your claim, please have your employer’s registration number and a return to work date readily available when you file your claim online.
  • Your employer should provide you with an Unemployment Separation Package, found here, but do not delay filing if you do not have it.
If you have any questions, please visit the CT Department of Labor Online Assistance Center. You may also submit your general question to dol.webhelp@ct.gov. A response can be expected in 3 to 5 business days, depending on volume.
Yes. It is illegal for an employer to retaliate against individuals who have exercised their rights under the Connecticut Unemployment Compensation Act. Conn. Gen. Stat. §31-226a provides individuals who believe that they have been retaliated against with an opportunity for a hearing.
Yes, you can require your employee to stay home. However, you should issue the employee an Unemployment Separation Package, found here.

Your employee may file for unemployment benefits and a determination will be made concerning their eligibility. Determinations will be made on a case-by-case basis. However, please note that an individual must be physically able and available for full time work in order to qualify for unemployment benefits.
Please direct your employees here to file their new claim for unemployment benefits.

For ongoing weekly continued claims filing, employees can file here.

The agency issues important emails throughout the initial claim filing process. Please advise your employees to look for these emails and read them carefully for next steps.
Please direct your employees to www.filectui.com and click the blue button to file their new claim for unemployment benefits.

For ongoing weekly continued claims filing, employees should go to www.filectui.com and click the green button.

The agency issues important emails throughout the initial claim filing process. Please advise your employees to look for these emails and read them carefully for next steps.
You will be liable in the same way you would be for a layoff or a shut down.

If the President declares a disaster that includes Connecticut and your company, it is possible you may not be liable.
Yes. The Department of Labor offers a SharedWork program which is a smart alternative to a layoff. The program allows employers to reduce the hours of full- time employees by as much as 60 percent, while their workers collect partial unemployment benefits to replace a portion of their lost wages.

All employers with two or more full-time or permanent part-time employees can participate in the program, which is not designed for seasonal separations. To qualify, the business’ reduction of workcannot be less than 10 percent or more than 60 percent.
For covered service workers and employers with 50 or more employees, PSL will cover certain absences caused by COVID-19. PSL provides up to 40 hours of leave for certain workers per year for the following reasons:
  • A service worker's illness, injury or health condition
  • The medical diagnosis, care or treatment of a service worker's mental illness or physical illness, injury or health condition
  • Preventative medical care for a service worker
  • A service worker's child's or spouse's illness, injury or health condition
  • The medical diagnosis, care or treatment of a service worker's child's or spouse's mental or physical illness, injury or health condition
  • Preventative medical care for a child or spouse of a service worker
Employees in CT are generally considered at-will employees, which means that either the employer or the employee is free to end the relationship at any time unless there is an applicable contract or collective bargaining agreement.

Therefore, in most cases, an employer who is not covered by the CT FMLA (over 75 employees in CT), federal FMLA (50 or more employees in a 75-mile radius) or CT’s Paid Sick Leave law (50 employees in CT) may terminate an employee for any reason as long as such termination is not based on an employee’s protected status such as the employee’s race, color, religious creed, age, sex, gender identity or expression, marital status, national origin, ancestry, present or past history of mental disability, intellectual disability, learning disability, physical disability, including, but not limited to, blindness or status as a veteran or any other applicable contract or law. The employer may institute a more lenient absenteeism policy.
Yes, in the same manner as she was paid when she worked on the employer’s premises.

If she is a non-exempt, “hourly” employee, she must be paid for the actual amount of time that you are requiring her to work. You are not required to pay a non- exempt employee for the time in which he or she performs no work.

If she is an exempt “salaried with qualifying duties” employee, the employer is required to pay her the full weekly salary if she works for any portion of the week. No deductions can be made from the exempt employee’s Paid Time Off (PTO) fringe benefit leave banks to cover the time off, pursuant to Conn. State Agencies Regs. § 31-60-14(b)(2)(A).
You may be protected if:
  • You are an eligible employee, who worked for the employer for at least 12 months and 1,000 hours in the past year
  • The employer is a covered employer for FMLA purposes (75 or more employees in CT) and you have FMLA time available
  • Your employer may require you to submit a medical certification from your health care provider, in order to determine if this is a serious health condition under the FMLA.
  • If your health care provider substantiates a serious health condition, FMLA will protect your job.
Also, your employer may institute a more lenient medical certification policy if it so wishes. See the CT FMLA Website.
You may be protected if:
  • You are an eligible employee, the employer is a covered employer for FMLA purposes, and you have FMLA time available.
  • Your employer may require you to submit a medical certification from your daughter’s health care provider, in order to determine if she has a serious health condition under the FMLA.
  • If her health care provider substantiates a serious health condition, the FMLA will protect your job. Also, your employer may institute a more lenient medical certification policy if it so wishes.
See the CT FMLA Website
Delaware
Agency Phone Number Website
Delaware Department of Labor New Castle County: 302-761-6576
Other Areas: 1-800-794-3032
http://www.ctdol.state.ct.us/UI-OnLine/

We have been in contact with the Delaware Department of Labor, Division of Unemployment Insurance regarding the significant number of unemployment insurance claim filings in their state due to the coronavirus (COVID-19). We are sending this communication to ensure all TPAs report any separations for work through SIDES the same way to ensure eligibility for an unemployment beneficiary in not interrupted.

If a worker is separated due to COVID-19, mark the claim separation in Data Element B-20 as a code 18 “Disaster Related Separation” and include information in Data Element B-33 “EmployerSepReasonComments” that the work stoppage is due to COVID-19.

If the worker is receiving any type of pay while off work, please also include that information in Data Elements B-26.1 through B-26.7 to ensure proper unemployment insurance eligibility is determined.

Unemployment benefits are available to individuals who are unemployed through no fault of their own. If an employer must shut down operations and no work is available, individuals may be eligible for unemployment benefits if they meet the monetary criteria. Employees who are working reduced hours may be eligible and must report their gross wages at the time they are earned, not paid. Delaware makes no distinction between part-time and full-time employees who are completely unemployed.
Delaware no longer has a waiting week. Claimants should submit a weekly pay authorization the Sunday after a claim is filed and every week thereafter even if they have not yet received a payment.
Delaware would treat this situation as a temporary layoff. The employee should make every reasonable attempt to preserve their health so they are able to return to work once released.
Delaware will consider this employee temporarily laid off during the state of emergency. The employee should return to work as soon as they are released. If work is no longer available after the employee is released for work or the employee fails to return to work, the agency will make a new determination.
In most cases, yes. However, the agency recognizes the burden placed on the health care industry during this time and will waive this requirement during the state of emergency.
If the president of the United States declares the coronavirus a national disaster, and if individuals experience a loss of work as a result, they may be eligible for unemployment benefits and/or Disaster Unemployment Assistance. If Delaware launches the Disaster Unemployment Assistance program, the public will be notified.
Unemployment benefits are proportionately charged to each employer based on weeks worked and wages earned in each individual's base period. Contributory employers could see an increase in their tax rate, which could result in higher taxes. Reimbursing employers would be charged dollar for dollar for benefits paid, which could result in higher than expected unemployment costs. Employers are able to apply for a rehire credit.
Work search requirements will be waived during the state of emergency for claimants filing for benefits as a result of the coronavirus outbreak.
Workers should file for benefits on our website here.

Questions can be emailed to uiclaims@delaware.gov. File an appeal, request an address change or complete fact finding documents on our claimant portal.
Register for SIDES to provide electronic responses directly to the Division at oes.delawareworks.com, SERVICE Tab, UISIDES

Contact the Division if you are laying off 25 or more employees. Email uiclaims@delaware.gov. Include the worker's name, social security number, and contact information for your business. That will assist us in streamlining the payment process.
Florida
Agency Phone Number Website
Florida Department of Economic Opportunity 1-800-204-2418 http://www.floridajobs.org/Reemployment-Assistance-Service-Center/
Individuals who may be eligible for Reemployment Assistance may include:
  • Those who are quarantined by a medical professional or a government agency,
  • Those who are laid off or sent home without pay for an extended period by their employer due to COVID-19 concerns, or
  • Those who are caring for an immediate family member who is diagnosed with COVID-19.
Individuals whose employment has been impacted, but are still receiving wages through paid leave are not eligible to receive Reemployment Assistance.
Reemployment Assistance provides temporary wage replacement (unemployment insurance) benefits to eligible individuals who are out of work through no fault of their own.
If you have a history of wages in the state of Florida, you are actively able and available to seek and accept new employment, and you are currently unemployed or work reduced hours through no fault of your own, you may be eligible to receive Reemployment Assistance benefits.
Reemployment Assistance claims are handled by the CONNECT system. You can file your claim by accessing CONNECT through www.floridajobs.org in the Reemployment Assistance Service Center in the right hand corner of the page.

People who need assistance filiing a claim online because of legal reasons, computer illiteracy, language barriers, or disabilities may call 1-800-681-8102.
You will need the following information to complete an application:
  • Social Security Number
  • Driver’s License or State ID
  • Your last 18 months of employment (including name, separation reason, earnings, and dates of work)
  • Work authorization (if not a US citizen)
  • DD-214 member 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, or 8 (if a military employee)
  • SF 8 or SF 50 (if a federal employee)
Your claim has two levels of review after you complete an application:
  • Your history of wages are reviewed to determine if you have earned enough to qualify for benefits
  • Any issues (such as job separation) found during your application are reviewed to determine eligibility
You must login to the CONNECT system every two weeks to request benefit payment. Your first date to return to CONNECT isprovided at the end of your application. You must request benefits even while your claim is being reviewed. During yourrequest, you will need to report your job searches, work and any earnings.
If you are determined eligible after all reviews are complete, payments will be distributed by direct deposit or through the Way2Go debit card based on your initial application. Debit cards are mailed after the first payment is processed and may take7-10 business days to receive by mail. Payments take 1-2 business to arrive after being processed.
Georgia
Agency Phone Number Website
Georgia Department of Labor 1-877-709-8185 https://dol.georgia.gov/

Employers are required to submit employer filed claims electronically for employees temporarily laid off as at result of COVID-19. This can only be done via the GDOL Employer Portal either by single entry or mass upload. Initiating such claims indicates that is the employer’s intent to retain the employees so they may return to work when business operations resume and work is available. The penalty for non-compliance is the employer will be required to repay the Department the full amount of benefits paid for each claim.

Claims for non-citizens cannot be processed until their legal presence in the U.S. is verified by Homeland Security. If Homeland Security cannot verify their legal presence using the information you submitted when filing their claim, the GDOL will mail a Request for Verification of Citizenship or Alien Status (DOL-5154PC) to the employee. They must submit a copy of the DOL-5154PC letter theyreceived and any of the following documents to GDOL:
  • I-551 (Permanent Resident Card)
  • I-766 (Employment Authorization Card)
  • I-94 (Arrival/Departure Record) in Unexpired Foreign Passport
  • I-94 (Arrival/Departure Record)
  • Unexpired Foreign Passport (with picture and temporary I-94 or I-551 stamp or other supporting documentation)
  • I-20 (Certificate of Eligibility for Nonimmigrant (F-1) Student Status)
  • DS2019 (Certificate of Eligibility for Exchange Visitor (J-1) Status
  • Naturalization Certificate
  • Certificate of Citizenship
  • I-571 (Refugee Travel Document)
  • I-327 (Reentry Permit)
  • Machine Readable Immigrant Visa (with picture and Temporary I-551 Language)
You may submit employer filed claims for full and part-time employees who are temporarily laid off or whose hours have been temporarily reduced because of a lack of work due to COVID-19. Employees must be expected to return to work when the COVID-19 emergency ends. They must also be United States (U.S.) citizens or non-citizens who are authorized to work in the U.S.

Do NOT submit claims for employees who:
  • are on scheduled/customary vacation, scheduled/customary plant shut down, or scheduled/customary plan closure (O.C.G.A. Section 34-8-195).
  • employed by a temporary agency and are currently working at your place of business.
  • were employed in another state in the last 18 months.
  • were employed with the federal government or on active military service in the last 18 months.
  • are 1099 employees.
  • are voluntarily out of work, e.g., quits, requested leaves of absence, self-quarantined, etc.
  • have been permanently separated from your company.
You will need the following information for each employee:
  • Name
  • Social Security Number
  • Work authorization information for non-citizens
  • Address
  • Date of Birth
  • Whether or not they want federal and/or state income taxes withheld (GDOL will withhold 10% for federal and 6% for state taxes.)
  • Earnings (Report gross wages—amount of pay before deductions— for any work they performed during the week for which you are filing. Report any vacation pay, holiday pay, and/or earnings during the week in which it was earned, NOT during the week it was paid to the employee. Report any additional income employees are receiving to the GDOL, except Social Security benefits, jury duty income, and pay for weekend military reserve duty.)
You must be a registered user on the Employer Portal with administrator or user privileges permitting you to submit employer filed claims. If your company is not registered on the Employer Portal, you must first establish an administrator account. Download the Administrator Guide on the Employer Portal login page and follow the step-by-step instructions.

If a third-party service provider is the administrator on your account, ask them to add you as a user and give you the ability to file employer filed claims. If you are already a registered user on the portal, but are not currently permitted to file employer filed claims, contact your Employer Portal administrator for assistance.

Follow these steps to file employer filed claims on the Employer Portal:
  1. Log into the Employer Portal.
  2. Select the employer account number under Registered Account.
  3. Select the File Employer Filed Claims link under Common Links.
  4. Select your method of filing—Multi-Claims Upload or Single Claim Entry. You must download and use the GDOL Excel template for Multi-Claims Upload. The Employer Filed Claims application will not retain your employee information when using Single Claim Entry. You must re-enter for each week.
  5. Follow the on-screen instructions.
When you file:
  • You must file an employer filed claim for each pay period. A week of partial unemployment consists of an employer’s established pay period week. Once a pay period is established, it should remain the same.
  • There must be seven (7) days between payment week ending dates.
  • Accurately report the employee’s name, social security number (SSN), and date of birth. They must match the Social Security Administration’s records.
  • Do NOT submit claims until after the week ending date on the claim. The Georgia Department of Labor (GDOL) cannot accept claims filed prior to the week ending date on the claim.
  • Report any leave pay, vacation pay, holiday pay, and/or earnings during the week in which it was earned, NOT during the week it was paid to the employee.
  • Report any additional income employees are receiving to the GDOL, except Social Security benefits, jury duty income, and pay for weekend military reserve duty.
They can elect to have state and/or federal taxes withheld by GDOL. They have the option of using direct deposit or the Georgia UI Way2Go Debit MasterCard®.

Employees choosing direct deposit must enter their direct deposit information on the GDOL website by selecting UI Benefit Payments Method under Individualson the Online Services page. A personal identification number (PIN) is required. A letter (DOL-8475) will be mailed to them notifying them of their PIN. If they do not receive the letter or forget their PIN, give them the following instructions:
  1. Go to dol.georgia.gov.
  2. Select Claim Weekly UI Benefits Payments. You will NOT claim benefits. This online application allows you to establish a new PIN.
  3. Enter your Social Security Number.
  4. Leave the field labeled “If you have already set up a PIN, enter it here” blank.
  5. Enter a 4-digit PIN of your choice in the field labeled “If you need to set up a PIN, enter it here.”
  6. Re-enter your 4-digit PIN in the field labeled “Reenter for verification.”
  7. Click on the Submit button.
Hawaii
Agency Phone Number Website
Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Relations Oahu: 808-586-8970
Hilo: 808-974-4086
Kona: 808-322-4822
Maui: 808-984-8400
Kauai: 808-274-3043
https://huiclaims.hawaii.gov/
You may be eligilble for Unemployment Insurance:
  • If your employer closed or temporarily closes, your hours are cut, or you are directed by your employer to remain home, you may be eligible for UI.
  • To apply for UI, please visit here.
  • You can call your local UI office for an appointment. Phone numbers may be found at labor.hawaii.gov/ui/contact.
  • Per Governor David Y. Ige, the DLIR is waiving the 7 day waiting period for UI claims related to COVID-19.
If you are unable to work due to being ill or need to be quarantined because with COVID-19, but your employer is still open, you may be eligible for Temporary Disability Insurance (TDI):
  • You must have a doctor’s note stating that you are ill or quarantined because of COVID-19.
  • Your COVID-19 illness or quarantine cannot be work-related.
  • You cannot be receiving workers’ compensation or UI.
  • To apply for TDI, please contact your employer and ask for the contact information for their TDI carrier.
  • There is a 7 day waiting period.
If you are ill with COVID-19 because of your job, you may be eligible for Workers’ Compensation (WC):
  • Your contraction of COVID-19 must be directly attributable to your job duties. For example, if a healthcare worker contracts COVID-19 because s/he cared for an infected patient, s/he is eligible for WC.
  • You cannot be receiving TDI.
  • To apply for WC, please contact your employer,inform them of your illness, and ask for the contact information for their WC carrier.
  • There is a 3 day waiting period.
If you need to care for a family member who is ill or quarantined because of COVID-19, you may be eligible to take family leave under the Hawaii Family Leave Law (HFLL):
  • You must work for an employer with 100 or more employees and worked for at least 6 consecutive monthsbefore qualifying to request family leave.
  • Family members include care for a parent, child, sibling, spouse, or reciprocal beneficiary.
  • HFLL is unpaid leave, but sick or vacation leave may be used to receive compensation.
  • You can takefamily leave for up to four weeks.
  • To requestforfamily leave, please contact your employer.
Please check with your employer regarding their sick leave policies, the amount of time that you may have earned and may be available for use, and details about how to use this benefit.

Workers that do not qualify to take family leave under HFLL may be qualified to take leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA). FMLA generally allows workers to take job-protected leave to care for themselves or a family member that has been impacted by COVID-19. For information about FMLA: More Info
Please contact the DLIR to discus show we can provide assistance.

  • The DLIR stands ready to assist with questions about UI, WC, TDI, and HFLL.
  • Requests for assistance can be made by calling (808) 586-8844 and selecting the program that administers the law.
  • Please be sure to provide your business’ name, a point of contact, telephone number,and/oremail address. DLIR employeeswill respond to inquiries in the orderthey were received.
  • Please also visit labor.hawaii.gov for more information.
Idaho
Agency Phone Number Website
Idaho Department of Labor 208-332-8942 https://www2.labor.idaho.gov/ClaimantPortal/Login

Mark the claim separation in Data Element B-20 as a code 18 “Disaster Related Separation” and include information in Data Element B-33 “EmployerSepReasonComments” that the work layoff is due to COVID-19.

If the worker is receiving any type of pay while off work, please also include that information in Data Elements B-26.1 through B-26.7 to ensure proper unemployment insurance eligibility is determined.

UI provides temporary income maintenance to individuals who have been separated from employment through no fault of their own and who meet all eligibility requirements, including the requirements that they be able and available for work, register with the state employment service and actively seek work. Click here for more information.
An individual temporarily laid off may qualify for benefits if he or she was able, available for and actively seeking work or returning to work with their employer within 16 weeks.
File online here. If you require assistance or do not have access to a computer, please call our claims center at (208) 332-8942.
An individual must be mentally and physically capable of performing a job.
An individual cannot have barriers preventing them from accepting work. A barrier could include lack of child care or transportation.
It depends. If your employer expects you to return to employment within 16 weeks, make sure to answer ‘yes’ to the question asking if you are returning to work within 16 weeks on your UI application. If not, you will be required complete two work search activities per week. Click here for more information.
No. No additional UI is available to individuals who have exhausted benefits for their current benefit year. If this situation changes, we will update our website.
No. There are no provisions to waive the waiting week. Click here for more information
It depends. Quitting for health reasons may be good cause. This would be determined on a case-by-case review.
If you are unable or unavailable for work, you would not meet the able and available requirements to qualify for benefits. Individuals still need to meet all eligibility requirements, including the requirements that the individual be able and available for work, and actively seeking work.
An individual who leaves work voluntarily without a reason attributable to the employer is generally disqualified from receiving UI. The reason the individual in this situation left work would not be considered attributable to the employer. Consequently, the individual would likely not qualify for UI. If you are unable or unavailable for work, you would not meet the able and available requirements to qualify for benefits.
You could be eligible for benefits. This would be determined on a case-by-case review.
It depends. Idaho law does not require the payment of vacation, holiday or sick pay. These items are agreed upon between the employer and the employee. If there is any change in a policy, the employee must be notified prior to the change.
Your first payment will arrive 7-10 business days earlier if you enroll in direct deposit. If you do not sign up for direct deposit, your payment method will default to a bank card. Please know that the bank card will arrive by mail 7-10 business days after your first payment is issued. You may enroll in direct deposit online at labor.idaho.gov/claimant portal under the Manage Claims section.
Yes. If you file online and have an out-of-state driver’s license or identification card, your online profile information will remain unverified, but please continue with the online application.
No. If there is a pending issue on your claim, additional information is needed to determine if you are eligible for benefits. A claims representative will contact you by phone or email for additional information. Continue to file your weekly certification carefully and honestly. There is no need to call the department unless you realize you made a mistake while filing. Note: Please do not put questions about your specific situation in the comments space on this article as we cannot answer individual questions online in order to protect your privacy.
Unemployment insurance (UI) benefits are available to individuals who are unemployed through no fault of their own. If an employer must shut down operations and no work is available, individuals may be eligible for unemployment benefits. Click here for more information.
They can file online at labor.idaho.gov/claimantportal. If they require assistance or do not have access to a computer, they may call our claims center at (208) 332-8942. Click here for filing information.
Yes. There are no provisions to waive charge requirements as a result of the coronavirus.
The president of the United States has declared the coronavirus a national disaster, but at this time there has been no Disaster Unemployment Assistance declaration.
It depends. Idaho law does not require the payment of vacation, holiday or sick pay. These items are agreed upon between the employer and the employee. If there is any change in a policy, the employee must be notified prior to the change.The president of the United States has declared the coronavirus a national disaster, but at this time there has been no Disaster Unemployment Assistance declaration.
Illinois
Agency Phone Number Website
Illinois Department of Employment Security 1-800-244-5631 https://www2.illinois.gov/ides/individuals/UnemploymentInsurance/
In general, UI provides temporary income maintenance to individuals who have been separated from employment through no fault of their own and who meet all eligibility requirements, including the requirements that they be able and available for work, register with the state employment service and actively seek work. Click here for more information.
An individual is considered able to work if he or she is mentally and physically capable of performing a job for which a labor market exists.
To be considered available for work, an individual cannot impose conditions on the acceptance of work if those conditions essentially leave him or her with no reasonable prospect of work.
An individual is considered to be actively seeking work if he or she is making an effort that is reasonably calculated to return the individual to work.
An individual temporarily laid off in this situation could qualify for benefits as long as he or she was able and available for and actively seeking work. Under emergency rules IDES recently adopted, the individual would not have to register with the employment service. He or she would be considered to be actively seeking work as long as the individual was prepared to return to his or her job as soon the employer reopened.
An individual who leaves work voluntarily without a good reason attributable to the employer is generally disqualified from receiving UI. The eligibility of an individual in this situation will depend on whether the facts of his or her case demonstrate the individual had a good reason for quitting and that the reason was attributable to the employer. An individual generally has a duty to make a reasonable effort to work with his or her employer to resolve whatever issues have caused the individual to consider quitting.
An individual in any of those situations would be considered to be unemployed through no fault of his or her own. However, to qualify for UI, he or she would still need to meet all other eligibility requirements, including the requirements that the individual be able and available for work, registered with the state employment service and actively seeking work from the confines of his or her home. The individual would be considered able and available for work if there was some work that he or she could perform from home (e.g., transcribing, data entry, virtual assistant services) and there is a labor market for that work.
Ordinarily, an individual who left work to address child care needs would be considered to have left work voluntarily and would generally be disqualified from receiving UI, unless the reason for leaving was attributable to the employer. However, the fact that all schools statewide have temporarily closed in response to the COVID-19 virus presents a unique situation in which it is unlikely a parent whose child cannot stay home alone has a ready alternative to staying home with the child himself/herself.

Under the current circumstances, someone who left work to care for the child could be considered as unemployed through no fault of his her own; in that case, to qualify for UI, the individual would still need to meet all other eligibility requirements, including the requirements that the individual be able and available for work, registered with the state employment service and actively seeking work from the confines of his or her home. The individual would be considered able and available for work if there was some work that he or she could perform from home (e.g., transcribing, data entry, virtual assistant services) and there is a labor market for that work.
At this point, no additional UI is available to individuals who have already received the full 26 weeks’ worth of benefits for their current benefit years.
At this time, no further guidance has been issued. Until such time, normal procedures will be followed. In general, the contribution rate of an experience rated employer is based, in part, on the amount of unemployment benefits paid to the employer’s former employees.
Rapid Response Services are available to employers who are planning or have gone through a permanent closure or mass layoff at a plant, facility, or enterprise, or a natural or other disaster, that results in mass job dislocation. The State Dislocated Worker Unit coordinates with employers to provide on-site information to workers and employers about employment and retraining services designed to help participants retain employment when feasible, or obtain re-employment as soon as possible. For more information, visit Rapid Response Services for Businesses or contact your local Illinois workNet Center.
Indiana
Agency Phone Number Website
Indiana Department of Workforce Development 1-800-891-6499 https://www.in.gov/dwd/2362.htm
Online, using a computer or smart phone. Go to www.Unemployment.IN.gov to file, and to see FrequentlyAsked Questions, the Claimant Handbook,and video tutorials.
You will need the following information to file:
  • A valid email account –your email address will become your Username
  • Your personal information, including your:
    • Indiana Driver’s license or Indiana ID card
    • Address
    • Social security number(SSN)
    • Date of birth
    • Phone number
  • Information about your last employer, including:
    • Employer’s name/company name
    • Employer’s mailing address
    • Employer’s phone number
  • Information about your employment, including your:
    • Dates of employment
    • The reason you are unemployed
  • Your bank routing number and account number if you chose direct deposit as your payment option (NOTE: a debit card -Key2Benefits prepaid MasterCard® -is also available)
Yes, if an employer must lay off employees due to COVID-19, the employees will be eligible for unemployment insurance (UI) benefits if they have earned enough wages to set up a claim and meet the weekly eligibility criteria. Employees must stay in contact with your employer and be available to work when called back by your employer.
Yes, if you are not receiving sick pay or other leave pay from your employer, meet the minimum amount of wages, and the reason you are out-of-work is because of the medical quarantine, you will be eligible under Governor Holcomb’s Executive Order during this public health emergency.
Yes, if you are otherwise eligible, are not receiving sick pay or other leave pay from your employer, meet the minimum amount of wages,and the reason you are out-of-work is because of the school or daycare closure, you will be eligible under Governor Holcomb’s Executive Order during this public health emergency.
If you are laid-off or have lost work related to COVID-19 and you meet the minimum amount of wages, then yes, you will be eligible. However, whether you meet the minimum amount of wages will probably depend upon how your employer reported your earnings to DWD in their quarterly reports. If your employer reported tips as part of your wages, then those tips are included in your base period wages.

If your employer did not report tips as part of your wages, it is possible you will not meet the minimum. If you receive a DWD determination that you do not meet the minimum amount, you can appeal that determination and request that DWD include your records of your tipped wages. If you have sufficient documentation, then your base period wages can be recalculated. Documents that will be considered include: pay stubs, W2, or any other type of documentation of payment from your employer. Sometimes a record of cash deposits to a bank account may be considered if no other evidence is available.
Yes, you may be eligible for benefits, but part-time employment during the week claimed will reduce the amount of benefits paid for that week. To find out if you are eligible, start your application for benefits as soon as you know that your hours are being reduced.

If you do work while receiving benefits, you must report any money you earned on the voucher for the week you worked (not the week you ultimately get paid for the work). Failure to report money you earned is fraud and can result in denial of benefits, collections actions, and criminal prosecution.
In most cases, no. However, the facts of each circumstance are important. You can file and DWD will evaluate your claim.
No, individuals receiving sick pay or other leave pay are not eligible for unemployment insurance (UI) benefits. However, the facts of each circumstance are important. You can file and DWD will evaluate your claim.
If you have not earned enough wages to meet the minimum eligibility, then you will not be eligible. This is determined by how much money you earned while working during your base period. Your base period includes the first four of the last five completed calendar quarters before the week you file an initial claim application for UI benefits.
  • If you file your initial claim application for UI between January 5, 2020, and April 4, 2020, your base period will be Q4 2018, Q1 2019, Q2 2019, and Q3 2019, which covers the dates October 1, 2018, through September 30, 2019.
  • If you file your initial claim application for UI benefits between April 5, 2020, and July 4, 2020, your base period will be Q1 2019, Q2 2019, Q3 2019, and Q4 2019, which covers the dates from January 1, 2019, through December 31, 2019.
The wages you earned during your base period are used to determine if you qualify for benefits and also to calculate how much you can be paid. The last quarter you worked is called the lag quarter, and no wages from that quarter count in your base period.

To meet the minimum eligibility for UI, your total wages during your base period must be equal to at least one and one-half (1.5) multiplied by your wages in the highest quarter of your base period. Your base period wages must also total at least $4,200, with at least $2,500 of those wages earned in the last six (6) months of the base period. For an example of this calculation, review pages 7-8 of the Claimant Handbook, found here.

We understand this is a complicated calculation, so the easiest way to find out if you meet the minimum eligibility is to file your claim immediately upon being laid-off and we will complete a wage calculation as part of your application process and notify you whether you met the minimum amount.
Yes. You must file a voucher EACH WEEK through the Uplink online filing system and comply with the terms of the weekly vouchers to continue to be eligible for and receive benefits each week. You must submit your weekly voucher during the week following your initial application and then every week after for as long as you remain unemployed. You must file the weekly vouchers even if you have not received a determination regarding eligibility for unemployment insurance (UI) benefits.
Yes. There is currently a one-week waiting period for payment of unemployment insurance(UI). This means that benefits are not paid for the first week you are eligible. You must still file a voucher for that week, if you do not that week will not count as your waiting week.
You should receive your first payment within three weeks if there are no issues with your initial claim application for benefits.
No. The previously scheduled in-person meetings for the weeks of March 16, 2020,and March 23, 2020, are suspended. UI Claimants who received a letter to attend should receive communication from their local WorkOne that those meetings are suspended. If you have questions regarding attendance, please contact your local WorkOne.
DWD will not be scheduling new RESEA in-person meetings until further notice but will be working to implement virtual services. UI Claimants whoare required to participate in virtual services will be contacted.
Iowa
Agency Phone Number Website
Iowa Workforce Development 1-866-239-0843 https://uiclaims.iwd.iowa.gov/UIInitialClaim/

Mark the claim separation in Data Element B-20 as a code 18 “Disaster Related Separation” and include information in Data Element B-33 “EmployerSepReasonComments” that the work layoff is due to COVID-19.

If the worker is receiving any type of pay while off work, please also include that information in Data Elements B-26.1 through B-26.7 to ensure proper unemployment insurance eligibility is determined.

If your business is considering a major layoff or shut-down, Iowa Workforce Development’s Dislocated Worker Program staff can help guide you through what will be a difficult process for your company and a difficult time for your employees. Our Rapid Response Team can help ensure compliance with federal regulations that apply to mass layoffs, and can provide a variety of services for your employees.
Employers experiencing a slowdown in their businesses or services as a result of the COVID-19 impact on the economy may apply for the Voluntary Shared Work Program. This program allows employers to seek an alternative to layoffs — retaining their trained employees by reducing their hours and wages that can be partially offset with unemployment insurance benefits. Learn more about its benefits for employers and employees, and how to apply. More Info
All unemployment claims filed and paid as a result of COVID-19 will have the charges waived for employers. This means that an employer's Tax rate will not be affected.
Yes. All charges will be waived.
Yes. The employer can require an employee to stay at home for the 14 day isolation period if they have traveled abroad or had contact with someone who visited an affected region. The employer should attempt to provide paid leave. If that is not available, your employee will be eligible for unemployment insurance benefits.
No. Iowa Workforce Development will take the appropriate actions to waive the charges for those employers who are forced to do layoffs or reduce work hours for employees due to the COVID-19.
No. An employer only needs to file a WARN notice if they intend to shut down permanently. In a temporary layoff, a WARN notice would not apply.
Should you have additional questions, please contact Iowa Workforce Development at 1-888-848-7442. The Iowa Unemployment Insurance Employer Handbook can be found here. Iowa Workforce Development will not be able to provide legal or human resources advice. Please contact your legal or human resources representatives for those questions.

Where can I find additional information for businesses and employers on COVID-19?
U.S. Department of Labor Iowa Department of Public Health Centers for Disease ControlCDC Resources for Businesses and Employers
Yes. Iowa unemployment benefits (“Benefits”) are available to individuals who are unemployed through no fault of their own. If an employer must shut down operations and no work is available, its employees would be eligible for unemployment benefits if they meet the monetary criteria.
Yes. Benefits are available to any individual who is unemployed through no fault of his/her own. If an employer must lay off employees due to the loss of production caused by the Coronavirus, individuals may be eligible for unemployment benefits if they meet the monetary criteria.
Yes. Iowa law allows for an employee to be on temporary layoff when work is not available.
Maybe. If the employer allowed this individual to telework, they would not qualify for benefits because they would not be unemployed. Employees should first see if the employer will offer paid time off to cover the time the employee must be out of work.
Yes. Your employer can require you to stay at home for 14 days if you have traveled abroad or had contact with someone who visited an affected region. Please contact your employer regarding potential telecommuting, sick leave, paid time off (“PTO”), Family & Medical Leave Act (“FMLA”), Disability and other options they may be offering. If paid time off is not available, you may be eligible for unemployment benefits.
Yes. Your employer can require you to stay at home for 14 days if you have traveled abroad or had contact with someone who visited an affected region. Please contact your employer regarding potential telecommuting, sick leave, paid time off (“PTO”), Family & Medical Leave Act (“FMLA”), Disability and other options they may be offering. If paid time off is not available, you may be eligible for unemployment benefits.
Eligibility will be determined on a case by case situation. If the suspicion of having the Coronavirus is legitimate and the facts show there is a high likelihood of being infected, the worker may be eligible for benefits for the incubation period of the virus. Please contact your employer regarding potential telecommuting, sick leave, PTO, FMLA, Disability and other options they may be offering. If paid time off is not available, you may be eligible for unemployment benefits.
Yes. Please contact your employer regarding potential telecommuting, sick leave, PTO,FMLA, Disability and other options they may be offering. If paid leave is not available from your employer, you will be eligible for unemployment insurance benefits if you meet all other monetary eligibility requirements.
Yes, those employees would be eligible for benefit.
​If you file a claim as a result of ​COVID-19, you will not be required to search for work.​ If your status changes with your employer and you do not plan on returning to work, please contact us.
Yes. Iowa allows for partial unemployment benefits. Impacted employees would still need toreport the wages earned per week when filing for benefits.
A disaster has not been declared by the President for individual assistance. If the president of the United States declares the COVID-19 a national disaster, and if individuals experience a loss of work in Iowa as a result, they may be eligible for unemployment benefits and/or Disaster Unemployment Assistance.
Please contact your employer regarding potential telecommuting, sick leave, PTO, FMLA, Disability, Worker’s Compensation and other options they may be offering. If paid time off is not available, you may be eligible for unemployment benefits.
Each situation will be handled based on the facts of the separation. You can file forunemployment insurance benefits if you are laid off or separated from your employer and you are notcurrently working. A determination will be made based on the reason for separation.
No, the individual—not the employer—is choosing not to work and, therefore, would beineligible. Please contact your employer regarding potential telecommuting, sick leave, PTO, FMLA,Disability and other options they may be offering.
Please contact your employer regarding potential telecommuting, sick leave, PTO, FMLA, Disability and other options they may be offering. If those options are not available, you may file for unemployment insurance benefits to determine your eligibility.
There are currently no extensions to regular unemployment benefits available.
Yes. This scenario would be treated as a separation and would be adjudicated according to Iowa Unemployment Law.
You should work with your employer on what leave may be available during the time they will not let you return to work. ​If paid time off is not available, you may be eligible for unemployment benefits.
Vacation pay is reportable for unemployment insurance purposes. Please contact our customer service center for further instructions.
We are working through guidance related to programs and the use of technology for service delivery and will update as soon as that is available.
Discussions with partners and program delivery are underway, further guidance will come out as soon as available.
Discussions with partners and program delivery are underway, further guidance will comeout as soon as available.
No, not during a scheduled break due to reasonable assurance rules but potentially after thebreak ends. However, if your employer recalls you, you must be able to return to work. If you are notable to return to work upon recall your eligibility for benefits could be questioned.
Will you continue to be paid from the school? If the school is going to continue paying you then you would need to report your weekly earnings during this time. If the school district will not be paying you then yes, you could be potentially eligible for benefits. However, if your employer recalls you to work, you must be able to return. Otherwise your eligibility could be questioned.
If you are on a scheduled school break such as Spring Break week, you will not be eligible for that week. If you are not on a scheduled break then you would eligible for benefits. However, if your employer recalls you, you must be able to return to work. If you are not able to return to work upon recall your eligibility for benefits could be questioned.
Kansas
Agency Phone Number Website
Kansas Department of Labor 1-800-292-6333 https://www.getkansasbenefits.gov/

If separation is connected to COVID 19 and the employee is NOT being paid; please list reason of separation: Temporary Layoff and put ”COVID 19” in the additional comments box.

If separation is connected to COVID 19 and the employee IS being paid; please select the reason of separation: Still Employed. You’ll then be prompted to provide the earnings.

We have created a new email for employers to send job refusal forms to: UICC.JobRefusals@ks.gov. If employers go to www.kansasemployer.gov, under “Employer Resources” there is a “Job Refusal” form that can be completed any time an employee refuses to come back to work.

If you are on a scheduled school break such as Spring Break week, you will not be eligiblefor that week. If you are not on a scheduled break then you would eligible for benefits. However, if your employer recalls you, you must be able to return to work.

If you are not able to return to work upon recall your eligibility for benefits could be questioned.
If you are receiving paid leave, it will be considered wages. If those wages for the week are more than your weekly benefit amount, you will not be eligible for benefits for that week.
To receive UI benefits, you must be able to work. For those who are not working due to COVID-19, KDOL is presuming that they are able to work, unless they refuse an offer of suitable employment due to illness or injury.
An individual must also be available for work in order to receive UI benefits. You will be considered available for work, if your unemployment is related to COVID-19, so long as you are taking all necessary steps to return to work for your regular employer and/or have not withdrawn from the labor market.
If you are unemployed due to COVID-19 and have taken all necessary steps to return to work for your regular employer, you do not have to look for other work.
The waiting week requirement for those unemployed due to COVID-19 is waived.
All employers must notify their employees of the availability of UI benefits at the time of separation from employment. While not required, employers may also consider filing claims by spreadsheet. More Info
Potentially, yes. If you have worked for an employer who pays unemployment taxes in the last 18 months, you may be eligible. We encourage you to apply. Our staff will determine whether or not you have sufficient insured earnings to support a claim for unemployment benefits.
Potentially, yes. To receive unemployment, an individual generally must be not working and not earning money. They must be able to work and must be available for work. Those impacted by COVID-19 may meet these requirements. Because each case must be individually evaluated, you would need to file a claim for benefits to be certain.
Potentially, yes.

There are three important details:
  • First, we will want to know why your hours werecut. If your hours were cut due to no fault of your own, then you may be able to get benefits.
  • Second, how much are your weekly earnings? If your earnings for a week are the same or higher than your weekly benefit amount, then you will be ineligible for unemployment in that week. When you file an initial claim, we will let you know what your weekly benefit amount would be.
  • Finally, you must also be physically able and available for work each week.
Gig Workers are considered self-employed in Kansas. If you have worked for an employer who pays unemployment taxes in the last 18 months, you may be eligible. We encourage you to apply. Our staff will determine whether or not you have sufficient insured earnings to support a claim for unemployment benefits.
School employees are usually subject to unemployment insurance disqualification. However, those provisions apply only to breaks between or within terms that are regularly scheduled. If any employee is off work outside of normal scheduled school breaks, the individual may be eligible for unemployment benefits provided they meet all usual unemployment requirements of being able to work and available for work and report any income they are receiving, if, any.
IMPORTANT: At this time, our Unemployment Contact Center is experiencing extremely high call volumesbecause of COVID-19. In order to avoid long wait times, please utilize our website as much as you are able. Ifyou are able to file a claim or find an answer to your question online, please utilize this resource and shareas needed. A few key steps:
  • Disable your pop-up blocker. Please refer to your web browser’s directions on how to do so.
  • If you are experiencing difficult accessing our website or a feature of our website, we recommend using Google Chrome as your web browser.
  • It is best to create an account or login from a desktop/laptop, instead of a cell phone.
  • Print or save the confirmation page when you file online as your proof that the claim has been filed. Italso has the weekly claims information on there.
For general guidance (including website and how to file for unemployment), please refer to our existing FAQs
The Kansas Department of Labor (KDOL) provides employers the option to assist their employees with filing an application for Unemployment Benefits during a layoff. This process allows the employer the ability to submit the application for unemployment insurance benefits for employees that are impacted by a plant shutdown, temporary layoff, permanent layoff or seasonal layoff.

What you need to know as an employer:
  • Submitting a layoff spreadsheet does not mean the employer is responsible for the affected employee’s unemployment claims. It will be the responsibility of the employee to file weekly claims and be aware of all eligibility and reporting requirements in order to receive payment.
  • KDOL does ask that the employer inform all employees included in the layoff that identity verification with the Social Security Administration will be conducted once the layoff spreadsheet is processed. If the employee does not pass the verification, they will be asked to supply a copy of their driver’s license and Social Security card to KDOL.
  • In some instances permanent layoffs have additional reporting requirements for employers under the Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act (WARN). The specific requirements can be found in the WARN Act Handbook for Employers from the United States Department of Labor.
  • Additional programs that could prove beneficial to your employees can be found under the Trade Act Program.
File By SpreadsheetFile Online
Kentucky
Agency Phone Number Website
Kentucky Career Center Office of Unemployment Insurance 502-564-2900 https://kcc.ky.gov/Pages/default.aspx
Under normal circumstances, the first week of an unemployment insurance claim does not receive payment. The Governor has opted to waive this if you were laid off due to COVID-19. This does not mean that you will receive benefits immediately. Kentucky pays unemployment benefits every two weeks.
Benefits can only be paid after the week has passed (example: you cannot claim the week ending March 5th until March 6th or after). Benefits are paid every other week or also known as bi-weekly.
Under the COVID-19 state of emergency job search requirements are temporarily waived for all recipients of UI.
Kentuckians affected by COVID-19 will receive payment for their first two weeks automatically after 13 days from the day the initial claim was filed. You will need to request your next payment by either by calling 1-877-369-5984 or www.kewes.ky.gov​. You will receive further information for subsequent check requests via email after the first payment is processed.
No. COVID-19, while being declared a state of emergency, is not a natural disaster.
You will continue to draw benefits until your employer begins operations. However, if you filed your claim and reported a date that you were returning to work, you will need to contact the UI Help Line to adjust/correct that information at 502-564-2900.
You may estimate your weekly benefit amount by using our tool. Weekly Benefit Calculator
  • Enter your earnings into the appropriate quarters.
  • You can log into your account 24 hours after submitting your claim, go to the Account Summary page and it will display your benefit amount.
NOTE: If you have wages from out of state or from employment with the Federal government, those wages may not be reflected immediately.
The system you are accessing may contain information back to 2003. If your attempt to register as a New User shows an error stating that social already exists in our system, you will need to click ‘Cancel’. From the Log In screen, click ‘Forgot’ PIN. When prompted, enter your social security number and any name variation you may have used since 2003 (maiden, former married, shortened name i.e. John instead of Johnathan, etc.).

Also note that if you have a suffix (Jr, Sr, etc), those fields are spacing and punctuation sensitive. Attempt with and without punctuation. If you are still unable to access the system, contact the UI Assistance line at (502) 564-2900, option 5, then option 6.
Yes. The recently approved federal CARES Act has extended the number of weeks from 26 to 39. Individuals whose UI benefits were exhausted after July 2019 are eligible to apply for the 13-week extension.
You are not able to change your name yourself, as this requires legal documentation. To expedite this process, log into your account, go to Document Upload, and upload a PDF or photo format of 2 forms of verification of your current name (State issued ID, Driver’s License, Social Security Card, Birth Certificate, Marriage/Divorce Decree, Passport or Military ID). Once the documentation has been uploaded, your file will be updated as soon as possible.​
Unemployment Insurance benefits have been expanded due to COVID-19 to include groups that are typically not covered by UI:
  • ​​​​Self-employed
  • Independent contractors
  • Freelance workers
  • S​ubstitute teachers
  • Childcare workers employed by religious-affiliated organizations and non-profits
​It also includes people leaving employment because of COVID-19 due to:
    ​​​​
  • Reasonable risk of exposure (self-quarantine)
  • Caring for a family member affected by COVID-19
Yes. All weekly payments will increase by $600. This will begin the week of March 29, 2020.

Example, if my benefit payment was $320 per week it will now be $920 per week starting on March 29, 2020. You will receive two payments one for $32​0 and one for $600. Under the CARE Act, the $600 payment is paid 100% by the federal government and will not be charged to employer accounts.
Yes. Under the CARES Act, those who have worked part-time over the past year will now qualify for UI. You will get the weekly benefit amount you qualify plus the $600. You will receive two payments. One for the weekly benefit amount and one for the weekly $600.​
No, you will receive your debit card before the money is deposited into your account. The money will go on the debit card when the claim is processed (Day 14 or 15). Claim Process Infographic
During these unprecedented times, unemployment insurance (UI) benefits have been made available to groups that are not normally eligible for benefits.
  • This includes individuals who have left their jobs because they have a reasonable fear that exposure to COVID-19 at their workplace will cause a negative impact on their health and they want to stay home.
  • Despite these flexibilities, a central requirement of UI eligibility has always been and still is, that an individual is eligible for UI if they are separated from their job due to no fault of their own.
  • If an employer provides reasonable accommodations for employees at their workplace or offers an option to telecommute, the employee must work if it is offered by the employer.
  • The employer maintains the opportunity to protest any claim that is filed by an employee. If the employer and employee disagree about what is considered reasonable accommodations, those UI claims will have to be decided by a UI staff member on a case-by-case basis. Either side has the right to appeal that decision.
For information about the appeals process, go to the Kentucky Career Center’s website to the Benefit Appeals page.​
Everyone who is otherwise eligible for Unemployment Insurance (regular UI, Trade, Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation, and Pandemic Unemployment Assistance)
It will be a separate deposit that will be made likely a few days after your UI benefit payment is deposited.
In general, you will receive $1,200 every two weeks. However, E-Claimants will receive $600 each week.
No. It will arrive after your benefit payment.
Current legislation has it funded until July 31, 2020
Louisiana
Agency Phone Number Website
Louisiana Workforce Commission 1-866-783-5567 https://www.louisianaworks.net/hire/vosnet/
Do any of these situations apply to you?
  1. Your work hours have been reduced because of lack of work due to Coronavirus.
  2. Your workplace closes temporarily, and you are not being compensated.
  3. You have been instructed not to go to work, and you are not being paid while at home.
You MAY be eligible for unemployment insurance.
  • You can file a claim at www.louisianaworks.net/hire or by calling our Claim Center at 866-783-5567. Effective March 17, 2020, we have extended our Claim Center hours to 8 a.m.- 7 p.m.
  • Be sure to answer “yes” to the question, “Are you filing for Unemployment Insurance benefits for reasons related to COVID-19 (Coronavirus)?” This will provide needed information to the LWC to help process your claim.
  • If your work hours have been reduced, partial benefits could be available to you up to a maximum of $247 a week. You must report any earnings for the week that you work, even if you’ve not yet been paid. Report the gross amount before deductions. These earnings would be factored into the amount of unemployment benefits paid to you for that week.
  • A number of factors determine eligibility for benefits. The LWC reviews each case separately.
  • The maximum number of weeks that unemployment benefits can be paid per claim is 26 weeks in a 12-month period.
  • Wages and vacation pay (received or will receive) MUST be reported when you file your unemployment claim. Sick leave and PTO do not need to be reported.
IMPORTANT NOTE: As per the Governor’s proclamation, for individuals whose employment has been impacted due to COVID-19:
  • Work search requirements are waived
  • Week of waiting is waived
If you are temporarily closing or reducing your hours of operations due to COVID-19, please contact the LWC to discuss how we can provide assistance and answer your questions about unemployment insurance and other programs and resources available.
  • Contact us at EmployerServices@lwc.la.gov with your unemployment insurance questions. Be sure to provide your company’s name, a point of contact, telephone number and email address, as well as specifics on the assistance you are requesting. The Employer Call Center, 225-326-6999, is also available.
  • For other programs and assistance, contact the American Job Center in your area. To find the closest American Job Center, visit here
IMPORTANT NOTE: As per the Governor’s proclamation, reimbursable employers impacted due to COVID-19:
  • Non-charges may be granted
Maine
Agency Phone Number Website
Maine Department of Labor 1-800-593-7660 https://reemployme.maine.gov/accessme/faces/login/login.xhtml
Due to the widespread impact of COVID-19 and the volume of temporary business closures, as of March 23rd, MDOL is waiving the work search requirement for all individuals on unemployment through May 14. This is consistent with the current duration of the temporary emergency unemployment insurance provisions enacted by the Legislature and signed into law by Governor Mills on March 18, 2020.

Individuals still need to file a weekly claim in order to get unemployment payments.
MDOL is receiving a great number of calls about unemployment benefits. If your work was impacted by COVID-19 in the last week (since March 15th), but you were unable to submit a claim for unemployment benefits, your claim will be accepted during week of March 23rd as well. Claims are accepted online 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

You can also view answers to Frequently Asked Questions online here. If your question isn’t answered there, you can submit a new question through the online Customer Message Portal (CMP). Questions are being answered as quickly as possible though there is a significant wait period. An unprecedented number of Mainers have been impacted by COVID-19 and we appreciate your patience.
MDOL has implemented an alphabetical call-in schedule to help reduce phone line congestion as it ramps up capacity to receive and process claims.

Those with last names beginning with:
  • A-H should call on Monday
  • I-Q on Tuesday
  • R-Z on Wednesday
  • Thursday and Friday are left unassigned for those who miss their alphabetical day or need to call at that time.
If you do not have access to a computer or the internet, you can call 1-800-593-7660 between 8 a.m. and 12:15 p.m. Monday-Friday.
It’s best to use a desktop, laptop or tablet to file for unemployment rather than a cell phone.
You should be able to do so. Currently the system allows two attempts to enter your password correctly. If you fail to provide the correct password a third consecutive time, your account will be locked and can only be unlocked by an unemployment representative. If you are unsure of your password or have entered your password incorrectly twice, use the “Forgot Password” or “Forgot Username” links provided.

As long as you have activated the email address that was associated with the account when the account was created, you can click on the "Forgot Password" link underneath the login boxes to have a new temporary password generated and sent to the email address on file in your account. Refer to the link below for instructions on how to activate your email if you have not done so already. You will be able to use this temporary password to log in and will be prompted to set up a new password, personal to you, at that time. For more information, please visit ReEmployME Login Information.
For claims filed under the new, temporary emergency unemployment legislation, the “waiting week” has been waived as of the date of the Governor’s Emergency Declaration on March 15, 2020. Initially, it may take up to 10 to 14 days to receive a payment as we need to program the unemployment claim system to carry out the emergency law changes.

You will not lose any benefits as a result, but you may receive multiple payments in the first week after the programming changes have been completed. After this, individuals filing for benefits can expect to receive payments weekly as long as weekly claims are filed timely and people remain eligible to collect benefits.
The individual should file for unemployment (online is the best way, available 24/7). MDOL will review the application and make a determination on a case by case basis about eligibility. Individual must be able and available to work and stay in contact with the employer.
Due to an unprecedented volume of claims, at the moment it might take two days for the claim to show up on your account.

For your records, please print or take a screenshot of the final confirmation page where the screen says the claim has been successfully submitted so that you have proof that we received it. (Usually, in times of lower volume claims, the new claim would show in the individual’s portal account within 24 hours. With high volumes, it is taking longer for every item to post to accounts.)
The same as regular unemployment benefits at any other time, a maximum of 26 weeks. If individuals are in a year of already receiving some unemployment, they may have already used up some of those 26 weeks. During times of high unemployment, extended benefits may be available based on guidance from federal partners. (We will update this information if there are changes at the federal level.)
The new UI measures are not intended to provide sick leave or short-term disability payments. To receive unemployment, the employee must be able and available to work and maintain contact with the employer.
If you are following guidance issued by a medical professional or public health official to isolate or quarantine yourself as a result of exposure to COVID-19 and you are not receiving paid sick leave from your employer, you may be eligible to receive unemployment benefits. You must be able and available to accept any work offered by your employer that would not cause you to break isolation or quarantine, and you would need to make sure that your employer has your current contact information.
If the business is being temporarily closed as a result of the impact of the COVID-19 virus and you are expected to return to work once the business reopens, you may be eligible for unemployment benefits. The work search requirement has been waived. You would not have to look for work as long as you remain able and available to work for your employer and make sure your employer has your current contact information.
You may be eligible for unemployment benefits during a temporary, unpaid leave of absence if you are expected to return to your job at the end of the leave so you should apply. You must remain able and available to work for your employer and make sure that your employer has your current contact information. In addition, you do not have to get documentation from a health professional
You may be eligible for and should apply for unemployment benefits (available through online system 24/7).
Yes, Maine has unemployment coverage for part-time work. The individual should file for benefits and MDOL will review and determine if the individual is eligible for partial benefit based on number of hours worked.
It depends. MDOL will need to make a determination based on the facts of each situation once a claim for benefits is filed. MDOL cannot provide a definite decision prior to the separation from a job.
If you are not working and not being paid, MDOL encourages you to apply for unemployment.
It depends. An individual should apply online for unemployment and MDOL will review and make a determination on a case by case basis. Under the new state legislation, during such a temporary leave of absence, an individual may be eligible for unemployment if that individual continues to remain able and available to work for and maintains contact with the relevant employer.

(The new federal legislation does extend eligibility to those in this situation. This program is not yet available in Maine. Once implemented, benefits will be paid retroactively. We will continue to provide more information as soon as it is ready.)
Per diem workers are covered under unemployment as long as they meet monetary eligibility, are able and available to work and stay in contact with their employer. They should apply for unemployment; their application will be reviewed and MDOL will make a determination.
Unemployment insurance depends on being “monetarily eligible” by review of wages earned over the last five full calendar quarters. Four consecutive quarters within that timeframe must have earnings of at least $5,140.74 and two of the four quarters must have earnings of at least $1,713.58.

These amounts are set annually based on the average weekly wages earned by Maine workers. The amount of benefits and the length of time someone can collect are based on how much you earn. More Info
In Maine, the maximum weekly benefit amount is $445.00. The average weekly benefit amount is roughly $340.00.
If immigrants or asylum-seekers have work authorization to work in the U.S. and lose their job due to COVID-19, they should apply for unemployment (preferably through the online system, available 24/7). MDOL will review the claim on a case-by-case basis as we would all other claims and make a determination about eligibility.
Please use your 11-digit I-94 number for this purpose (even though the application will say “A Number,” it is the I-94 number that is needed).
Yes, MDOL does not offset benefits for Social Security payments.
Generally, students who are in work study jobs are not (unemployment) covered employees. However, there may be special circumstances that could be considered if students also had other employment beside work study. They are encouraged to apply for unemployment through the online system (available 24/7): www.maine.gov/unemployment.
No, this will not affect your weekly unemployment benefits.
It depends. You should file a claim for unemployment. MDOL will review your employment history and make a determination about eligibility.
Governor Mills signed an Executive Order (15 FY 19/20) on March 19th ordering that all school districts continue to pay their hourly school employees for the duration of this school year. These employees will not be eligible for unemployment insurance because they will be receiving their regular pay, a preferable situation.
If employees are concerned about the safety of their workplace, they should express their concerns to their employer or manager and let them try to address the issues. If employees are not comfortable doing that or if the issues are not resolved, they can contact OSHA (if employees work for a private employer or the federal government) or the Maine Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Standards (if employees work for a state or local government) to file a complaint.

In addition, please see other items on the MDOL website for additional options such as paid leave related to COVID:

More Info
No. As long as you plan to return them to their jobs when you resume operations, and provided they remain able and available to work for you and provide you with current contact information by which to reach them, they will not have to seek other work.
Continuing to provide health insurance will not impact your employee’s ability to receive unemployment benefits.
Employers are encouraged to contact MDOL’s Bureau of Unemployment Compensation to learn about Workshare, an unemployment option that helps businesses retain their workforce during a temporary slowdown in work. The program allows employers to voluntarily reduce the hours of staff in lieu of layoffs. Employees of the business are allowed to collect a partial unemployment benefit to help them offset the loss of income.

More Info
It is easier to determine unemployment eligibility in the case of a layoff because there is a clear separation from work. To be eligible for unemployment, individuals must lose their jobs through no fault of their own.
If the self-employed are incorporated, they will be eligible for unemployment benefits. However, most independent contractors, small business owners and other self-employed individuals are not incorporated, do not contribute to unemployment taxes and usually are not eligible for unemployment benefits.

However, the new temporary federal unemployment programs will cover the self-employed. These new programs are complex, and we are working to implement them as quickly as possible. At this moment, those are self-employed should wait to file a claim for benefits.

Since these programs have not been implemented yet, filing at this point will only result in a denial. We will continue to provide information as it becomes available. Once implemented, benefits will be paid retroactively.
The new state temporary measures in the new legislation are for all covered workers in the state.
Unlike private sector employers, nonprofit and government employers can choose to either pay into the unemployment trust fund or to cover the cost of benefits paid out directly. Private employers must contribute to this social insurance program so that the resources are available during economic downturns.

Those who choose not to pay the unemployment tax are typically responsible for 100% of the cost of any benefits paid to former employees. MDOL awaits final interpretation of the federal CARES Act from U.S. DOL; it appears that the legislation provides federal funds to cover 50% of the state unemployment benefits that would have otherwise been charged to direct reimbursable employers.

Maine cannot waive the remaining 50%. Having no source of funding available to cover these costs would result in the transfer of the liability to taxable private employers. As of December 31, 2019, there were slightly over 1,000 direct reimbursable employers in Maine.
The work is being performed in NH so all claimants (workers) will need to file claims in NH regardless of their individual residences.
No. Employers are not required to pay out all paid time off before a layoff, but they are allowed to do so. Use of leave time during a temporary layoff depends on an employer’s policies. The employer may require use or payout of leave time. Payments received by employee may have an impact on unemployment benefits paid to an individual.
No, MDOL can’t determine whether an individual would be eligible for unemployment before that person separates from the employer. An individual must separate from their employer and then file a claim. MDOL reviews the case to make a determination. If an individual is not sure whether they would be eligible, it is best to apply. The individual must still be connected to the labor market in order to receive benefits, be able and available for work and retain contact with the employer.
Employees cannot volunteer at a for-profit business. Employees cannot volunteer to perform the same work they would normally get paid to do for a public employer. If employees are laid off—by a private or public employer—and then go back in to perform work for their employer, they are employed (not laid off) and must be paid wages. If they are truly laid off, they can apply for unemployment benefits through the online system.
If an individual receives unemployment benefits due solely to COVID-19, benefits paid to the worker would not be charged against the experience rating record of the employer.
If the employees have been truly laid off and are separated from you, their employer, then the payout of PTO will not count against unemployment insurance benefits. If it is an unpaid leave of absence due to COVID- 19 measures, employees can apply for and receive unemployment benefits.

If employees are receiving pay for a leave of absence (in any of these forms: sick leave, vacation pay or regular wages), they are not unemployed and would not collect UI on top of their earnings. New federal legislation was enacted March 18th on paid sick leave and paid family and medical leave.

More Info
Maryland
Agency Phone Number Website
Maryland Department of Labor 410-949-0022 http://www.dllr.state.md.us/employment/unemployment.shtml

If a worker is separated from employment due to the reduction/elimination of available work caused by the impact of COVID-19 on the business, mark the claim separation Data Element B-20 as a code "1 = Temporary Layoff" if the return to work date is known or as code "2 = Laid Off/Lack of Work" if the return to work date is unknown. Data Element B-13 is the last day the worker physically performed services.

If the worker is receiving any type of pay while off work, please also include that information in Data Elements B-26.1 through B-26.7 to ensure proper unemployment insurance eligibility is determined

If you are laid off temporarily due to a business shutdown as a result of COVID-19, the Division of Unemployment Insurance recommends that you file a claim for unemployment insurance. After you file a claim for unemployment insurance benefits, the Division of Unemployment Insurance will determine whether you qualify to receive unemployment insurance benefits.

You can apply for unemployment insurance benefits online or by phone between 7:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, at 410-949-0022 (within the Baltimore-metro area and out-of-state) or 800-827-4839 (from within Maryland).
The first and best option for employees who need to miss work due to illness is to use their employer-paid time off. The Maryland Healthy Working Families Act requires employers with 15 or more employees to provide paid sick and safe leave for certain employees. Maryland employers who employ 14 or fewer employees are required to provide unpaid sick and safe leave for certain employees.
Maryland Healthy Working Families Act

“Unemployment” includes a reduction of both work hours and earnings. An individual receiving paid sick leave or paid family leave is still receiving pay and would generally not be considered “unemployed” for purposes of collecting unemployment insurance benefits.

If you are currently quarantined by a medical professional or under government direction, and your employer has instructed you not to return to work until the quarantine is over and has not provided the option to telework, the Division of Unemployment Insurance recommends that you file a claim for unemployment insurance. After you file a claim, the Division of Unemployment Insurance will determine whether you qualify to receive unemployment insurance benefits. You can apply for unemployment insurance benefits online or by phone between 7:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m., Monday through Friday 410-949-0022 (within the Baltimore-metro area and out-of-state) or 800-827-4839 (from within Maryland).
If you are not exhibiting any symptoms of coronavirus, COVID-19, and you decide to leave your employment, the Division of Unemployment Insurance recommends that you file a claim for unemployment insurance. You may be determined to be eligible for benefits if the circumstances of your job separation are allowable under Maryland’s provisions for good cause and/or just circumstances for voluntarily leaving work, Section 8-1001 of Maryland Unemployment Insurance Law.

After you file a claim, the Division of Unemployment Insurance will determine whether you qualify to receive unemployment insurance benefits. You can apply for unemployment insurance benefits online or by phone between 7:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m., Monday through Friday 410-949-0022 (within the Baltimore-metro area and out-of-state) or 800-827-4839 (from within Maryland).
The first and best option for employees who need to miss work due to illness is to use their employer-paid time off. The Maryland Healthy Working Families Act requires employers with 15 or more employees to provide paid sick and safe leave for certain employees. Maryland employers who employ 14 or fewer employees are required to provide unpaid sick and safe leave for certain employees.
Maryland Healthy Working Families Act

If you are currently quarantined by a medical professional or under government direction, and your employer has instructed you not to return to work until the quarantine is over and has not provided the option to telework, the Division of Unemployment Insurance recommends that you file a claim for unemployment insurance.

After you file a claim, the Division of Unemployment Insurance will determine whether you qualify to receive unemployment insurance benefits. You can apply for unemployment insurance benefits online or by phone between 7:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m., Monday through Friday 410-949-0022 (within the Baltimore-metro area and out-of-state) or 800-827-4839 (from within Maryland).
Maryland unemployment benefits are available to individuals who are unemployed through no fault of their own. If an employer lays off employees due to a loss of production as a direct result of COVID-19, individuals may be eligible for unemployment benefits if they meet certain criteria. It is recommended that you file a claim for unemployment insurance. You can apply for unemployment insurance benefits online or by phone between 7:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m., Monday through Friday 410-949-0022 (within the Baltimore-metro area and out-of-state) or 800-827-4839 (from within Maryland).
If your employer has reduced your normal work hours as a result of COVID-19, you may be eligible for partial benefits. You can apply for unemployment insurance benefits online or by phone between 7:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m., Monday through Friday 410-949-0022 (within the Baltimore-metro area and out-of-state) or 800-827-4839 (from within Maryland).
If your employer goes out of business as a result of COVID-19, the Division of Unemployment Insurance recommends that you file a claim for unemployment insurance, as you are considered to be unemployed through no fault of your own. You can apply for unemployment insurance benefits online or by phone between 7:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m., Monday through Friday 410-949-0022 (within the Baltimore-metro area and out-of-state) or 800-827-4839 (from within Maryland).
If you continue to work your normal hours remotely, you do not meet the definition of an individual considered to be unemployed. However, if you work less than your normal hours remotely, it is recommended that you file a claim for unemployment insurance. You can apply for unemployment insurance benefits online or by phone between 7:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m., Monday through Friday 410-949-0022 (within the Baltimore-metro area and out-of-state) or 800-827-4839 (from within Maryland).
The Division considers each claimant’s efforts in relation to the labor market conditions to determine if the search for work criteria under Section 8-903 of Maryland Unemployment Insurance Law has been satisfied. During this period of dramatically changing labor market conditions, the Division might not require claimants to search for jobs, but may instead require claimants to perform other reemployment activities, such as creating a resume, completing online classes and training courses, or completing other approved online tasks that prepare the claimant to become reemployed in a future, stabilized labor market.

Claimants are not required to search for work if their employer has temporarily laid off the claimant and has provided a return to work date that is less than 10 weeks in the future.
No employer will see an increase in their tax rate for 2020 due to the coronavirus, COVID-19. Unemployment insurance benefits are proportionately charged to each employer based on the employee’s earnings in their base period. Contributory employers may see an increase in their 2021 tax rate as a result of benefits paid due to COVID-19; however, tax rates are calculated based on benefits that have been charged to the employer account over the prior three (3) years, ending on June 30. Thus, any benefits paid due to coronavirus, COVID-19, from March to June will comprise four (4) months of the 36 months used to calculate the 2021 tax rate for employers.

In the event that a process for employers to apply for a waiver of charging of any benefits paid due to coronavirus, COVID-19, additional information will be provided outlining the requirements. Waivers will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis and approved as the law allows.

Reimbursing employers are charged dollar for dollar for benefits paid to their former employees.
Massachusetts
Agency Phone Number Website
Massachusetts Department of Unemployment Assistance 617-626-6338 https://www.mass.gov/unemployment-insurance-ui-online
Yes. Apply as soon as possible. Please apply online.
You will get approximately half of your average weekly wage up to a maximum of $823. You also get $25 per dependent child up to an amount that is half of your UI check.

Benefits Calculator
You can receive up to 26 weeks of unemployment benefits, total, in a benefit year.
Yes. If you applied on or after March 10, 2020, you will get unemployment benefits for the first week of unemployment.
Yes, if your employer has reduced your hours of work or your wages, you may be eligible for partial unemployment benefits.
Yes. Workers who are temporarily unemployed due to lack of work because of COVID-19 will be eligible for unemployment benefits. They will be considered unemployed due to lack of work regardless of whether they are quarantined, laid off, furloughed, or if their workplace is fully or partially shut down temporarily. This status is granted automatically for the first 4 weeks, and then, your employer may request that this status be extended to 8 weeks. If necessary, DUA has authority to allow for longer periods.

Instead of looking for other work, you must remain in reasonable contact with your employer, and be prepared to go back to work when the employer has hours for you and you are able to do so.
Yes. A worker is who is quarantined due to an order by a civil authority or medical professional or leaves employment due to reasonable risk of exposure or infection or to care for a family member and does not intend to or is not allowed to return to work is eligible for unemployment benefits. The worker need not provide medical documentation and need only be available for work when and as able.
You should continue to do an online work search as you are able. Many things that can be done remotely count as work search activities. For example, continue to monitor job boards and post resumes. You only need accept suitable work, however. If you are quarantined, are self-quarantining due to a reasonable fear of exposure, or you must care for a family member who is sick, or a child who is at home, you do not need to accept work until those conditions resolve.
Yes. If you or a member of your immediate family or household is ill with a suspected or confirmed case of the virus, or you have been directed to quarantine by your employer, medical professional, or health official or government authority, DUA will consider this to be good cause for not meeting the deadline, whether or not you or a member of your immediate family or household has been actually diagnosed with the coronavirus.
You are not eligible for unemployment if you are working full-time hours in any given week, even from home. If you were a full-time employee before your workplace shut down and you now are working part-time hours from home, you may be eligible for partial unemployment benefits.
Yes. But you must report any earnings. Once the earnings reach a certain amount, your unemployment benefits will be reduced on a dollar for dollar basis until you reach the amount of your weekly benefit, in which case, you will be ineligible for that week. This calculation is done on a weekly basis, so you need to accurately report your earnings to DUA each week.
Unfortunately, under current law 26 weeks is the maximum amount of benefits to which you’re entitled. Once you reach that limit you are not entitled to more weeks, even if you began your claim before the current crisis.
Currently, self-employed individuals and properly-classified 1099 contract employees are not eligible for unemployment benefits.
Yes, employees will be paid for the first week if their claim was filed on or after March 10th.
The Emergency Regulations make it easier for claimants impacted by COVID-19 to successfully claim unemployment benefits. They also permit DUA to excuse missed deadlines during the processing of a claim, such as responding to fact finding questionnaires and requesting an appeal, if the reason for failing to meet the deadline is due to COVID-19. The regulations also permit DUA to grant employer requests for extensions for filing quarterly wage reports and paying contributions.
The regulations greatly reduce the work search requirements for all claimants who are unemployed due to COVID-19, regardless of whether the reason is a temporary layoff with an expected return to work, a plant, office, or store shutdown, or as a result of quarantine. It doesn’t matter if the quarantine was ordered by a governmental or health authority. A self-imposed quarantine based on a reasonable fear of illness or exposure also qualifies.

In all cases, a claimant need only be “capable of, available, and actively seeking” work that is suitable for them. Under the new regulations, work is not suitable if it endangers the health of the employee or others in the employee’s household. If a claimant is quarantined, self-quarantined due to a reasonable fear of exposure, or is caring for a family member who is sick, or a child who is at home, the claimant not need to accept work until those conditions resolve.

Workers who are temporarily unemployed due to lack of work because of COVID 19 and expect to return to work will be eligible for unemployment benefits. They will be considered unemployed due to lack of work regardless of whether they are laid off, or furloughed, or if their workplace is fully or partially shut down temporarily. Under the Emergency Regulations, individuals in such situations are considered to be in “Standby Status.” Standby status is meant to help both employers and their employees in situations where the unemployment is expected to be temporary. Employers maintain contact with their workforce during the period of unemployment and have experienced employees ready to return when work becomes available again. Employees who find themselves in those situations due to COVID-19 will be approved for benefits more quickly, and will be relieved of traditional work search activities. In order to fulfill the requirements to be able, available and actively seeking work, individuals on standby status need only take reasonable measures to maintain contact with their employer, and to be available for hours offered by the employer.

Claimants in the situations described above will be presumed to be eligible for four weeks of standby status. For the four-week presumption, the employer need not even respond that the claimant is on standby. Employers may request, however, that the standby status be up to eight weeks, and, if necessary, DUA can extend standby status for longer that eight weeks.
Your workers should be eligible for unemployment benefits. Workers who are temporarily unemployed due to lack of work because of COVID-19 who expect to return to work with their employer will be considered on standby status. Your laid-off employees will be expected to reasonably maintain contact with you while they’re unemployed and be available for work when you offer it. You should have employees ready to return when the store reopens.
Tell them to apply for unemployment. They should be eligible for benefits. Workers who are temporarily unemployed due to lack of work because of COVID-19 who expect to return to work with their employer will be considered on standby status. Your waiters, waitresses, and bartenders will be expected to reasonably maintain contact with you and be available for work when you offer it to them.
Yes, they may be eligible for partial benefits depending upon the amount of money they are earning.
More Info
If the furlough is because of COVID-19, employees are eligible for unemployment benefits. Workers who are temporarily unemployed due to lack of work because of COVID-19 and expect to return to work will be eligible for unemployment benefits. Under the Emergency Regulations, individuals in such situations are considered to be in “Standby Status.” Standby status is meant to help both employers and their employees in situations where the unemployment is expected to be temporary.

Employers maintain contact with their workforce during the period of unemployment (in this case, a furlough) and have experienced employees ready to return when work becomes available again. Employees who find themselves in those situations due to COVID-19 will be approved for benefits more quickly, and will be relieved of traditional work search activities. In order to fulfill the requirements to be able, available and actively seeking work, individuals on standby status need only take reasonable measures to maintain contact with their employer, and to be available for hours offered by the employer.

Claimants in the situations described above will be presumed to be eligible for four weeks of standby status. For the four-week presumption, the employer need not even respond that the claimant is on standby. Employers may request, however, that the standby status be up to eight weeks, and, if necessary, DUA may extend standby status for longer that eight weeks.
The WorkShare program is an alternative for employers faced with a cut in workforce. Employers can divide available work between affected employees instead of laying off workers. Employees are able to receive part of their unemployment insurance benefits while working reduced hours and being paid for those hours by their employer.
Currently the Department of Unemployment is looking at the effect of COVID-19 on employer charging. Please note rates will not change until January 2021.
Michigan
Agency Phone Number Website
Michigan Department of Labor and Economic Opportunity 1-866-500-0017 https://www.michigan.gov/
The fastest and preferred method is to file for unemployment insurance benefits online using the Michigan Web Account Manager (MiWAM) at https://www.michigan.gov/uia. You must first sign in to MILogin to access or create a MiWAM account. For step by step instructions, view the MiWAM Toolkit for Claimants. You may also file by phone at 1-866-500-0017. If you are hearing impaired, TTY service is available at 1-866-366-0004. Please visit the UIA website for the online and telephone filing schedule. Claimants are assigned a day and time to file online or by phone according to the first letter of their last name.

You will need to create a new MILogin for Citizens account before you can create or access your MiWAM account. If you have already created a MILogin account through another department, you simply need to log in and link your MiWAM account before you can access your MiWAM account. You will need to use your personal email address for MILogin for Citizens.
Michigan law requires we consider wages you have earned over the last 18 months in calculating your weekly benefit amount. The maximum entitlement is a weekly benefit amount of $362 per week. Under Executive Order 2020-24, the maximum entitlement for weeks of benefits for existing claims as of 3/15/2020 and new claims filed between 3/15/20 and 4/18/20 is 26 weeks. In addition to changes under EO 2020-24, Congress enacted the Relief for Workers Affected by Coronavirus Act (Act). In addition to the temporary measures enacted by Governor Whitmer, the Act does the following:
  • Adds 13 additional weeks of unemployment benefits in Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) to the 26 weeks of benefit entitlement under EO2020-24, for a total of 39 weeks of benefits payable.
  • Adds an additional $600 per week of Pandemic Unemployment Compensation (PUC) to the weekly benefit amount payable. This amount is payable for weeks of benefits between 3/29/2020 – 7/31/2020.
You will need:
  • Social security number,
  • Your state issued driver’s license or ID card number
  • The names and addresses of employers you worked for during the past 18 months, along with your quarterly gross earnings
  • The dates (first and last day of employment) with each employer.
  • Your most recent employer’s Unemployment Insurance Agency (UIA) account number or Federal ID number. Providing the account number may speed up the processing of your claim. The employer’s Federal ID number appears on your annual W-2 form).
  • If you are not a U.S. citizen or national, you will need your Alien Registration number and the expiration date of your work authorization.
For more information about filing for benefits, view Fact Sheet 160, Claiming Unemployment Benefits in Michigan
Although circumstances may vary, individuals should expect their first payment about three weeks after they file their claim. Subsequent payments are released every two weeks after the individual certifies. The day or time of day in which a claim is filed will not impact whether a worker receives benefits or their benefit amount. Claims will be back-dated to reflect the date in which a claimant was laid-off or let go from their job due to COVID-19.

Claimants must certify (report) every two weeks that they are eligible for benefits. After the first certification (which is done during the third week of unemployment) they will receive their payment in about 3-5 days. Certification can be done using a person’s MIWAM account and/or by phone by MARVIN.
Yes. Certify online with MiWAM at michigan.gov/uia 24 hours a day, 7 days a week or by phone at 1-866-638-3993 Monday - Saturday; 8:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.
No. Claimants should not report to a Michigan Works! Agency to register for work. The application for benefits for all claimants will be used to satisfy the work registration requirement.
The amount of wages earned with employers prior to filing a claim are used to establish eligibility. It does not matter if the employment was full-time or part-time or paid on commission or if the wages paid were in the form of salary, hourly or tips.
Yes. Your UIA benefits are taxable. You have the option to have both federal and state taxes withheld from your weekly payment. By the end of January each year, you will be mailed Form 1099-G, Certain Government Payments, which reports benefits paid to you the previous calendar year. You will need this form to report your income for both federal and state taxes.
You can choose to receive benefits by UIA debit card (issued by Bank of America) or by direct deposit to your bank or credit union account.
If you have an active claim or benefit year in effect on 3/15/2020, and you were entitled to 20 weeks of benefits, you will get the additional 6 weeks of benefits, unless there are less than 6 weeks left in your benefit year (for example: if you only have 4 weeks left on your benefit year, you will only be paid the 4 weeks).

In addition to the weeks of benefit entitlement on a regular claim, the Relief for Workers Affected by Coronavirus Act adds 13 additional weeks of unemployment benefits in Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC). With these additional benefits, individuals may be eligible for up 39 weeks of benefits. You may also receive an additional $600 per week of pandemic unemployment compensation (PUC) in addition to the weekly benefit amount payable. This amount is payable for weeks between 3/29/2020 – 7/31/2020. You do not need to do anything additional to receive the additional 13 weeks of PEUC or the additional $600 of PUC benefits.
No. Each time you file a new claim, your unemployment benefit entitlement is established. Weeks left over from a previous claim do not carry over to a new claim.
If you are working part-time and collecting unemployment, make sure to report your earnings when claiming the week in benefits. Unemployment benefits are reduced based upon your earnings you receive when working part-time.
Workers who are sick, quarantined, or immunocompromised and who do not have access to paid family and medical leave or are laid off are eligible for unemployment benefits.
If you are unable to work because you are ill as a result of COVID-19, you will qualify for unemployment benefits.
Yes. If you’re unable to work because you are caring for an ill or quarantined family member, caring for someone with a confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19, or have a family care responsibility as a result of a government directive, you will qualify for unemployment benefits.
If you are following guidance issued by a medical professional or public health official to isolate or quarantine yourself as a result of exposure to COVID-19 and you are not receiving paid sick leave from your employer, you may be eligible to receive unemployment benefits.
If you are without employment due to COVID-19, file for unemployment.
If you are not receiving payment from your employer, such as paid sick leave or paid time off, you may be eligible for unemployment benefits during this time.
If you are laid off work temporarily or if your hours are reduced due to a business slowdown or a lack of demand as a result of COVID-19, you may be able to receive unemployment benefits.
Yes. With PUA, many people, including those who don’t typically qualify for unemployment benefits, such as self-employed workers, independent contractors, low-wage workers and those with limited work history may qualify for PUA. Under PUA individuals will receive an established weekly benefit amount and an additional $600 per week in Pandemic Unemployment Compensation.
Please contact the Unemployment Insurance Agency to resolve the matter. We may ask you to provide a copy of your driver’s license/state ID and birth certificate or social security card to rectify the problem.
Minnesota
Agency Phone Number Website
Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development Twin Cities Area: 651-296-3644
Greater Minnesota: 1-877-898-9090
https://uimn.org/applicants/
Employers affected by the COVID19 pandemic are considering a variety of options to reduce costs and avoid layoffs. Some key strategies include:
  • Temporarily or permanently expanding paid leave: large employers across the U.S. (including Walmart, Apple, McDonalds, Uber, Instacart, and others) are revising their paid leave policies in response to COVID-19. Studies show access to paid leave can reduce employee absenteeism and employee turnover. The Minnesota Department of Health also notes that paid leave may help you avoid a costly, unexpected worker shortage due to widespread illness.
  • Accommodating requests for part-time schedules: consider offering your full-time employees the option to work part-time (while maintaining their ordinary employee benefits). This may be helpful for workers facing a short-term disruption in childcare.
  • Offering unpaid leave: in addition to offering part-time schedules, some businesses are offering employees the option to take unpaid time off (or sabbaticals). Even if a small number of employees are interested, this approach could result in a significant cost savings.
  • Providing early retirement options: A short-term investment in voluntary retirement packages may benefit your employees while helping you cut costs.
  • Thoughtfully implementing furloughs: Temporary furloughs (e.g., cutting one paid day per two-week pay period) may allow you to continue paying wages and benefits while reducing costs. Make sure to talk with your employees about your furlough strategy and adjust as necessary. For example, if you employ a married couple with children, you can help them cover childcare by ensuring they are furloughed on opposite schedules.
Yes. The Shared Work Program is designed to help you reduce costs without losing your valued employees. If your business reduces hours by 50 percent or less, the Shared Work Program can help defray some of your employees’ lost wages.

Maintaining your current workforce will help you avoid the expense of recruiting, hiring, and training new workers. The Shared Work Program will also allow you to resume full operations quickly when business conditions improve.
More Info
If you have substantially reduced an employee’s hours (below 32 hours per week) or their rate of pay, they may be eligible for unemployment benefits.
Unemployment benefits may be available to some workers who take a voluntary layoff to avoid the layoff of another worker (and meet certain other requirements). See Minnesota Law, $268.088 for the list of requirements.
If you have temporarily laid off an employee, the employee can meet work search requirements by staying in regular contact with you about when work will resume.
It depends on the situation. Workers who are receiving vacation pay, sick pay, or personal time off (PTO) pay equivalent to their normal rate of pay are ineligible for unemployed benefits. If you require an employee to take an unpaid leave of absence, the employee may be eligible for unemployment benefits.
It depends on the situation. We are suggesting that workers who find themselves in this situation apply for unemployment benefits to find out if they are eligible.
We understand your concerns about future UI costs. In this extraordinary time, our first obligation is to do what’s right for our business, workers, families and communities. In the UI program, our primary concern is going to be focused on paying eligible applicants.

Employers are usually responsible for the cost of unemployment benefits paid to their workers. Given the unprecedented situation with COVID-19, Governor Tim Walz issued an executive order to relieve taxpaying employers of benefit charges associated with COVID-19. This means that any unemployment benefits your workers collect as a result of the pandemic will not be used in computing your future UI tax rate.
The Walz-Flanagan administration is working to help businesses access financing that will help them continue operating as conditions get more challenging. This includes working to secure federal disaster loans for businesses through the United States Small Business Administration (SBA).

The Minnesota Legislature is also considering special measures to provide targeted financial assistance to businesses affected by COVID-19.

In addition to these financial resources, your local Small Business Development Center offers free consulting services from local business experts.
Wage detail and UI tax payments for the first quarter 2020 are due on April 30th. We know this is a busy time. We ask that you try to file your quarterly reports and pay your UI taxes on time if at all possible. As we get nearer to the actual deadline, we will announce any administrative changes for those employers who will need to be late.
If your hours or your rate of pay have been substantially reduced, you may be eligible for unemployment benefits. We encourage all workers affected by COVID-19 to apply for unemployment benefits. The UI Program will review your application and determine your eligibility for benefits.
Unemployment benefits are available to individuals who are unemployed through no fault of their own. If your employer shut down operations and no work is available, you may be eligible for unemployment benefits (assuming you meet other eligibility requirements).
Unemployment benefits are available to individuals who are unemployed through no fault of their own. If your child’s school district, daycare, or other childcare provider has notified you that your ordinary childcare is unavailable, and you have requested accommodation from your employer and were denied, you may be eligible for unemployment benefits (assuming you meet other eligibility requirements).
Unemployment benefits may be available to some workers who take a voluntary layoff to avoid the layoff of another worker (and meet certain other requirements). Contact us if you have questions about voluntary layoffs.
If you are temporarily laid off, you can meet work search requirements by staying in regular contact with your employer. If you are permanently laid off, you will need to actively seek suitable employment.

Under Governor Walz’s executive order, you may meet this requirement by seeking suitable employment that does not pose a risk to your health or to the health of others.
Workers who are receiving vacation pay, sick pay, or personal time off (PTO) pay equivalent to their normal rate of pay are ineligible for unemployed benefits. If your employer required you to take an unpaid leave of absence, you may be eligible for unemployment benefits.
We are suggesting that workers who find themselves in this situation apply for unemployment benefits to find out if they are eligible.
Mississippi
Agency Phone Number Website
Mississippi Department of Employment Security 1-888-844-3577 https://www.mdes.ms.gov/unemployment-claims/claims-information/
To file an Unemployment Claim, visit the MDES website at www.mdes.ms.gov or call the MDES Contact Center at 1-888-844-3577.

On-line filing is encouraged! A claim may be filed on-line at www.mdes.ms.gov twenty-four (24) hours a day, seven (7) days a week.

Online Unemployment Services
If you decide to file a claim for benefits, you should file as soon as possible. Claims are typically effective the Sunday of the week in which you file an initial claim for unemployment.
You will need your work history information for the past 18 months including:
  • Employer Names
  • Addresses
  • Phone Numbers
  • Reason for Separation
  • Dates of Employment
  • Current Contact Information
  • Driver’s License or
  • State ID Number and Social Security Card
You may be eligible and should file for unemployment benefits and a determination will be made concerning your eligibility. Determinations will be made on a case-by-case basis.
Currently, you are required to be physically able to work. Should there be any state or federal declarations related to the COVID-19 virus, MDES is ready to apply any guidelines rendered in accordance with the declaration.
If an individual is quarantined and will return to the employer, this individual would be considered laid off. You may file for unemployment benefits and a determination will be made concerning your eligibility. Determinations will be made on a case-by-case basis.
Unemployment taxes are not paid on Independent Contractors or the self-employed so these earnings cannot be used to establish a claim for unemployment benefits. Should there be any state or federal declarations that determines an independent Contractor or self-employed worker eligible resulting from a claim filed related to the COVID-19 virus, MDES is ready to apply any guidelines rendered in the declaration.
Currently, there is no disaster unemployment declaration related to benefits paid as a result of coronavirus. Should there be a federal declaration related to the COVID-19 virus, MDES is ready to apply any guidelines rendered in the declaration.
No proof is required at this time. Do not delay filing your claim for unemployment benefits even if your employer has not issued you any paperwork. It is important to file as soon as you become unemployed. For faster processing of your claim, please have your employer’s information and a return to work date readily, if one has been provided by your employer.
You may be eligible and should apply for unemployment benefits. Determinations will be made on a case-by-case basis.
You may file for unemployment benefits and a determination will be made concerning your eligibility based on your specific circumstances. Determinations will be made on a case-by-case basis.
Currently, you are required to be able and available to work. Should there be any state or federal declarations related to the COVID-19 virus, MDES is ready to apply any guidelines rendered in the declaration.
You should file for benefits as you may be eligible for partial unemployment. Please note: when working and filing, all hours and gross earnings must be reported. A portion of your gross earnings will be deducted from your weekly benefit amount.
Under the unemployment insurance laws, individuals who are separated from employment due to no fault of their own may be eligible for benefits. The determination would be made based on the circumstances of each case.
The current statute dictates that an employer’s account will be charged for benefits paid to result from a lack of work. MDES is monitoring and reviewing federal and state guidelines related to COVID-19 and may exercise flexibility where applicable in accordance federal or state executive orders.
Based on current statute, an employer’s tax rate could be impacted by charges to their account; however, MDES is monitoring and reviewing federal and state guidelines related to COVID-19 and may exercise flexibility where applicable in accordance with federal or state executive orders.
Continuing to provide health insurance will not impact your employee’s ability to receive unemployment benefits.
Missouri
Agency Phone Number Website
Missouri Department of Labor and Industrial Relations 1-800-320-2519 https://uinteract.labor.mo.gov/benefits/home.do
No. Generally speaking, an individual still receiving pay while off of work is not “unemployed” and is ineligible for unemployment benefits.
In most situations, yes. Missouri unemployment benefits are available to individuals who are unemployed through no fault of their own. If an employer must shut down operations temporarily and no work is available, individuals may be eligible for unemployment benefits if they meet the eligibility criteria.

Weekly work search requirements are not required when there is a recall date within eight weeks of the temporary lay-off. If the recall date changes but is within the initial eight weeks from the last day worked, the employee must contact a Regional Claims Center representative to update the recall date.

An employer may apply for approval of an extended recall and work search waiver for employees of up to sixteen weeks. For more information about recall and extended work search waiver please visit labor.mo.gov/DES/Employers/extended_waiver.
In most situations, yes. Missouri unemployment benefits are available to any individual who is unemployed through no fault of his or her own. If an employer must lay off employees due to the loss of production caused by the coronavirus, individuals may be eligible for unemployment benefits if they meet the eligibility criteria. Employers may be able to avoid a lay-off with a partial shut down by applying for the Missouri Shared Work program.
An employer can participate in a shared work plan if they meet the eligibility requirements for Missouri’s shared work program. The Shared Work Unemployment Compensation Program is an alternative to layoffs for employers faced with a reduction in available work. It allows an employer to divide the available work among a specified group of affected employees instead of a layoff.

These employees receive a portion of their unemployment benefits while working reduced hours.For more information about the eligibility requirements for Missouri’s shared work program, please visit www.sharedwork.mo.gov , email sharedworkinfo@labor.mo.gov or call 573-751-WORK (9675).
Yes. The Electronic Mass Claims Filing System is available to employers during a temporary mass lay-off. Employee information provided by the employer, allows the DES to file an initial or renewed unemployment claim on behalf of employees quickly and efficiently. An employer can participate in a mass claim filing if they meet the eligibility requirements below:
  • The lay-off must be due to a lack of work
  • The lay-off must be less than eight weeks in duration
  • An employee is not on a leave of absence
  • The employee is not receiving pay; for example, sick pay, vacation pay, family medical leave pay, etc.
  • For more information about the Mass Claims Filing System, please call 573-751-0436.
Unemployment benefits are proportionately charged to each employer based on weeks worked and wages earned in each individual’s base period. For contributory employers, benefits paid out and chargeable to the employer will be used to calculate future tax rates and could result in an increase in unemployment taxes. Reimbursable employers are charged dollar for dollar for benefits paid, which could result in higher than expected unemployment costs for the employer.

For more information about employer tax rate calculations and the impact of benefit charges, please call 573-751-1995 or email esemptax@labor.mo.gov.
In most situations, yes. Weekly work search eligibility requirements are not required when there is a recall date within eight weeks of the temporary lay-off.
The individual may be eligible for benefits. Unemployment benefits are available to individuals who are totally or partially unemployed due to no fault of their own. In this example, the individual—not the employer—is choosing not to work. However, the facts of each circumstance are essential.

If the employer allowed this individual to telework and the individual chose not to accept that work, they would not qualify for benefits because they would not be unemployed. If the employer required the individual to stay home but did not offer telework, the individual might be eligible for benefits.
In most cases, no. Unemployment benefits are available to individuals who are totally or partially unemployed due to no fault of their own. In this example, the individual is not available for work due to caring for children and would be ineligible. However, the facts of each circumstance are essential in determining eligibility for unemployment benefits.
Maybe. The facts of each circumstance are essential in determining eligibility for unemployment benefits and each situation must be handled on a case by case basis.
If the President of the United States declares the coronavirus a national disaster with individual assistance available, and if the individual experiences a loss of work in Missouri as a result, they may be eligible for unemployment benefits and/or Disaster Unemployment Assistance.

NOTE: The March 13, 2020, national disaster emergency declaration did NOT include individual assistance.
Once the individual is separated from work, they should immediately file a claim for unemployment benefits.
Not at this time.
If an individual is required to participate in the RESEA program the RESEA interview will be completed over the phone at this time. Claimants should contact the MO Job Center at the phone number listed on the appointment letter. If the individual is unable to participate, they may reschedule their interview appointment by contacting the job center at the phone number listed on their appointment letter.
Montana
Agency Phone Number Website
Montana Department of Labor and Industry 406-444-2545 https://montanaworks.gov/Job-Seeker-UI-Claimant

Montana requests that integrated partners report temporary closures, in Data Element B-20 as code 18 “Disaster Related Separation“ and include comments in Data Element B-33 “that the work stoppage is due to Coronavirus/COVID-19.”

Report reduction in hours in Data Element B-20 as code 11 “Still Employed, Hours Reduced by employer” and include comments in Data Element B-33 that the reduction in hours is due to Coronavirus/COVID-19 initiated by employer or staff inability to work due to Coronavirus/COVID-19.

Federal law requires those placed on a temporary layoff, related to the COVID-19 pandemic, to return to work if called back. Failure to do so when there is available work could be considered a "refusal of work" and potentially disqualify the claimant from receiving unemployment insurance benefits. To report refusals of work to the Montana UI Program, email uieservices@mt.gov. Please provide as much detail as possible regarding the claimant’s refusal of work, including: the claimant’s name, the date(s) they refused work, what type of work was offered, how was the work offered and by whom, and what was the reason given for not accepting the work. It is imperative we receive this information to minimize and prevent UI fraud. If you have any questions, please contact our eServices Customer Support at (406) 444-3834, select option 2, or email uiservices@mt.gov.

If you have had to reduce hours of or lay-off workers due to COVID-19 impacts, encourage them to file a claim for unemployment compensation at MontanaWorks.gov; they may be eligible for benefits. An unpaid temporary closure of an employer’s operations functions as a lay-off from work, even if the employer intends to have their employees come back to work when operations resume.

Keep watching our COVID-19 FAQ webpage for updates. We will also announce any changes using a variety of mediums including: our website, email, and social networks.
File for UI benefits online at MontanaWorks.gov. Use the benefits estimator to calculate possible weekly benefit amount. Please do not call the state COVID-19 hotline for UI questions.
If an employee is working less than their customary hours, they may be eligible to receive partial benefits.
This is really claim specific. If there are any issues or areas that need to be investigated, it will take longer to process. Please have your employee contact our phone center or review any outstanding issues online at MontanaWorks.gov.
If you have not already, sign-up for SIDES right away. Signing up for SIDES will allow us to communicate electronically with you regarding claims filed by your employees, provided you sign-up before they file. The quicker we can gather the information required the better. Review our SIDES Information Sheet to learn more. To sign-up visit uieservices.mt.gov or call (406) 444-3834 (select option 2) for help.
The duration of a claim depends on a claimant’s wages during their base period. Steps to determine eligibility, amount and length of benefits can be on page 8 of the claimant handbook.
Your employees may be considered job attached. Advise them to select the Job Attached option when filing or reactivating their UI claim.
Fax a list to: (406) 444-2699 ATTN: Claims Processing. When these lists are received, they are input in our system.
Yes. If you have questions regarding benefit charging to employers, please call our Employer Charging unit at (406) 444-0399.
It does not affect them any differently than an hourly employee, they can file a UI claim.
Under the emergency rules that went into effect March 17, 2020, employers will not be charged on a COVID-19 claim.
Either would be considered a layoff.
It depends. If the business operated as a corporation or an LLC filing as a corporation, and the business reported wages for the owner as a corporate officer, the owner may be eligible for UI benefits.

If the owner of the business is a sole-proprietor, partner, or LLC member whose LLC files as a partnership, those entities are not subject to UI and the owner would not eligible for UI benefits.

For more information please review section 3 of our Employer Handbook.
Currently self-employed individuals and 1099 contract employees are not eligible for unemployment benefits as wages are NOT considered covered by the Unemployment Insurance program. To be eligible, either you or an employer had to make contributions in the past 18 months.
File online at MontanaWorks.gov. If you are new to this website, you will have to first create an account to file a new Unemployment Claim. If you have filed for unemployment in the past, you may be asked for a Security Word. Please be aware that Security Word used to be Mother’s Maiden Name on the previous website. If you do not have access to a computer, you can file your claim through our Claims Processing Center by calling (406) 444-2545 Monday through Friday 9:00 a.m.- 4:00 p.m.
Unemployment benefits will be available for eligible individuals who are requested by a medical professional, local health authority, or employer to be isolated or quarantined due to COVID-19, even if they are not actually diagnosed with COVID-19.
Yes, if the employees meet all other requirements. Those still working can file due to a reduction in hours.
In most cases, no. Unemployment benefits are available to individuals who are totally or partially unemployed due to no fault of their own. In this example, the individual has not been directed to quarantine themselves and is choosing not to work. Therefore, they would be ineligible.
It depends. If there is reasonable assurance an employee will return to work or start a new job, the employee may be Job Attached and have their Work Search requirement waived.
  • If the employee’s unemployment is NOT related to the COVID-19 virus, there must be an approximate date they will return to at least 30 hours of work per week.
  • If an employee is laid off or had their hours reduced due to the COVID-19 virus, they can be job attached regardless of their hours upon return. Since there is no certainty when the COVID-19 virus will allow employees to return to work, we recommend a return date of 9/30/2020. If work resumes sooner, then employees will simply stop filing and return to work.
  • Please be advised that employees must remain in contact with their employer for available work while they are filing.
It depends. Unemployment benefits are available to individuals who are totally or partially unemployed due to no fault of their own. If work is still available with your employer at the place of business (whether in person or by teleworking), you may not qualify for benefits.
Employees who are directed to be quarantined are considered unemployed and may be eligible for benefits.
Currently self-employed individuals and 1099 contract employees are not eligible for unemployment benefits as wages are NOT considered covered by the Unemployment Insurance program. To be eligible, either you or an employer had to make contributions in the past 18 months.
First, ask the employer why you haven’t received your final check. If the employer refuses to give you your final check, you may choose one of the three options to obtain your wages:
  • Obtain the services of a private attorney;
  • File a claim in court; or
  • File a wage claim with the Investigations Section of the Employment Relations Division at the Montana Department of Labor & Industry.
  • You can download the wage claim form here.
When an employee is laid off or discharged, all wages are due immediately (within four hours or end of the business day, whichever occurs first), unless the employer has a preexisting, written policy that extends the time for payment. In the event of a preexisting written policy, the wages may not be delayed beyond the next payday for the period in which the separation occurred, or 15 calendar days.
Nebraska
Agency Phone Number Website
Nebraska Department of Labor 1-855-995-8863 https://neworks.nebraska.gov/vosnet/

Mark the claim separation in Data Element B-20 as a code 18 (“Disaster Related Separation”) and include information in Data Element B-33 (“EmployerSepReasonComments”) that the separation is due to COVID-19. If the worker is receiving any type of pay while off work, please also include that information in Data Elements B-26.1 through B-26.7 to ensure proper unemployment insurance eligibility is determined.

In order to be eligible for unemployment insurance benefits, you must meet the minimum earnings requirement from insured work during the base period (time period of employment used to evaluate your claim). For 2020, the minimum earnings requirement is $4,324. The minimum earnings requirement is adjusted annually. In addition to meeting the minimum earnings requirement, you must also have been paid at least $1,850 in one quarter of the base period and $800 in another quarter. Wages must be earned from employers required to pay unemployment insurance taxes (insured employers). NESL: 48-627(5)(b)
We recommend you go to your claims summary screen to see if the claim you filed exists. The instructions/guidance information is also located here: dol.nebraska.gov/ UIBenefits.

Another option would be to visit your local American Job Center where a representative can assist you. Wait times are long due to the unprecedented events, so you may want to call ahead.

If there are any issues with your claim, they will show up on the claim summary screen, and a claims adjudicator will contact you to discuss them further. We are addressing claims in the order they were received.
You will be able to update demographic information on your account, however once you have submitted your claim you will not be able to update wage data. If you have changes that need to be made, you can send a detailed email of those changes to NDOL.UnemploymentHelp@nebraska.gov.
We do not have a timeframe for when the $600 will be distributed, but all individuals who are eligible for any unemployment benefit in Nebraska will also receive an additional $600 per week on top of their weekly benefit amount. In the meantime, please continue to file your weekly certifications. Once further federal guidance is available, the $600 will be retroactively paid on all eligible weeks claimed. The additional payment is for weeks beginning March 29, 2020 through July 31, 2020.

For updates, check this link regularly: dol.nebraska.gov/PressRelease/Details/141
If a workplace is operating during COVID-19, workers should provide a doctor’s note when filing for unemployment. The note must explain what work you can perform.
If you are self employed or a gig employer you will need to file an unemployment claim for benefits. If you are denied regular unemployment benefits a judgment will be made to determine eligibility for new federal unemployment programs.
We cannot provide guidance without all of the facts. If you are not working, you may file for Unemployment Benefits. If your employer indicates a different separation reason than lack of work, the claim will be reviewed by an adjudicator and processed according to Nebraska Employment Security Laws and Regulations.
We recommend that you file a claim to begin the process of having your claim adjudicated/determined. These claims are not backdated, so we encourage everyone to file and allow the process to begin. If it is determined you are eligible, you will receive a determination. In the meantime, you must also file weekly certifications each week while you are not working.

If you receive any paid leave while you are under quarantine, from your employer, you must report that during your weekly certification as well.
We recommend that you file a claim, to begin the process of having your claim adjudicated/determined. These claims are not backdated, so we encourage everyone to file and allow to begin the process. If it is determined you are eligible, you will receive a determination. In the meantime, you must also file weekly certifications each week while you are not working.
Claimants must go online to NEworks.nebraska.gov to file their claims.

If you do not have access to a computer, you can visit a local American Job Center where a representative can assist you. Due to unprecedented events, wait times are long. We suggest calling ahead to make an appointment.
Many of the documents sent to claimants are sent via their preferred method, as indicated on their account. If your preference is email, the documents could be in your Spam file. If your preference is message center, then check your message center daily for updated documents. If US mail, you may want to confirm that your mailing address is current.
Yes
Yes, an employer can require you to work less hours, more hours, or hours outside of your typical schedule.
Yes. Additionally, if you are advanced PTO/vacation and are paid for it then choose to leave the company before you have earned the advance, the employer could make a deduction from your wages in order to recoup the advance.
Yes, an employer can dictate when you have to use leave. An employer can also deny the use of leave.
No. Nebraska is an employment at will state. Both the employer and employee can terminate employment at any time without notice.
Yes, as long as there is no discrimination based on a protected class (race, color, national origin, religion, sex (including pregnancy), disability, marital status, or age).
Yes
Yes
No. Your employer is only required to pay you for the time in which you are you working. If you are salary exempt employee we recommend contacting the USDOL as the answer may be different for you.
Yes. Typically, there are ADA protections in place that would not allow employers to check employee’s temperatures because it is considered part of a medical examination. However, the ADA has guidance on requirements when we are in a pandemic. When a pandemic is declared employers may measure employees temperatures without violating ADA guidelines.
Qualifications are unchanged by the executive order. Unemployment Insurance is for employees laid off from work; separated under non-disqualifying conditions. Individuals must still meet the standard monetary eligibility requirements. Employees should file a claim online, and we assess eligibility at that point in time.
All claimants must meet monetary eligibility requirements and be unemployed through no fault of their own. Layoffs because of the COVID-19 pandemic are non-disqualifying. Waivers of Work Search, Unpaid Waiting Week and Employer Charging in Executive Order 20-04, apply to all claimants for the duration of the Executive Order.
Due to increased claim load we are not able to give an estimated timeframe, but NDOL is working diligently to get payment as quickly as possible to eligible individuals.
Direct them to NEworks.nebraska.gov or the NEworks mobile app to file an unemployment claim. There are step- by-step instructions on how to file a claim at dol.nebraska.gov/uibenefits.
Part-time employees are welcome to apply. Claims filed are handled on a case by case basis.
There is no timeframe. if anyone is unsure about qualifying, go to NEworks.nebraska.gov and file anyway.
If you are unsure if you qualify, go to NEworks.nebraska.gov and file. If an employer is reducing hours we recommend you consider Short-Time Compensation. Information about the STC program is available at https://dol.nebraska.gov/STC.
Employers simply need to reply to the Department as information is requested. The Department will reach out via phone and in writing.
This is determined on a case-by-case basis. Generally speaking, a claimant will receive 1⁄2 of their average weekly salary. The maximum weekly benefit amount in Nebraska is $440.
No, this requirement is waived for claimants from March 22nd through May 2nd 2020.
Eligibility is possible. Employees should go to NEworks.nebraska.gov and file. If an employer is reducing hours we recommend considering Short-Time Compensation. Information about the STC program is available at https:// dol.nebraska.gov/STC.
Nevada
Agency Phone Number Website
Nevada Department of Employment Training and Rehabilitation Northern Nevada: 775-684-0350
Southern Nevada: 702-486-0350
Rural Areas and Out of State Callers: 1-888-890-8211
http://ui.nv.gov/css.html
Claims are filed online using the Claimant Self Service (CSS) at ui.nv.gov. The telephone claim center is available only if they are not able to file online. Staff assisted filing is available but they may experience excessive wait times due to the current high volume.
We are waiting on guidance for the US Department of Labor. Until such a time, normal procedures will be followed.
We are waiting on guidance for the US Department of Labor. Until such a time, normal procedures will be followed.
We are waiting on guidance for the US Department of Labor. Until such a time, normal procedures will be followed.
Employers are encouraged to use SIDES E-Response and the Employer Self-Service ESS online system to communicate with the Division. Additional information pertaining to the electronic filing can be found under Help and Resources by selecting the Tips for Using the New System link.
If they have returned to work, they can simply stop filing their weekly claims. It is not necessary to contact the Division to stop benefit payments.
New Hampshire
Agency Phone Number Website
New Hampshire Department of Employment Security 1-800-852-3400 https://nhuis.nh.gov/claimant/

For all separations related to COVID-19, New Hampshire needs integrated partners to use Code 18 "Disaster Related Separation" in B-20 and include comments in B-33 that the work stoppage is due to COVID-19

The CARES Act (see What is the CARES Act?) provides temporary financial support for you if you are affected by COVID-19, including:
  • Creating a temporary Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program
  • Expanding unemployment benefits to more workers, including self-employed, contractors, and furloughed workers
  • Increasing unemployment benefits by $600 per week until July 31, 2020
  • Making an additional 13 weeks of unemployment available to those who need it
  • Waiving the normal one-week waiting period for unemployment benefit applications.
If you have a reduction of hours or job loss due to COVID-19—including if you are under quarantine or self-quarantine, if you are a caretaker, and if you are ill—you are eligible to apply. The NHES division is solely responsible for determining eligibility and payment of unemployment benefits.
For workers in New Hampshire, the CARES Act and the state have expanded existing unemployment benefits as follows:
  • The minimum New Hampshire unemployment benefit has been raised from $32 per week to $168 per week. With the CARES Act, this makes the total minimum unemployment benefit in New Hampshire $768 per week.
  • Unemployment benefits can be paid for up to 39 weeks. Note: The additional $600 benefit is only available through July 31, 2020.
  • Payment of unemployment benefits generally begin eight days from when a claim is filed. Anyone receiving a benefit needs to log in weekly to file a claim continuation if they wish to maintain payment.
  • The State requirement to be actively seeking a job and submitting a minimum number of job applications per week has been suspended, as long as individuals intend to return to work.
To apply for benefits, visit nhes.nh.gov. Important: The volume of unemployment applications is very high, so access to apply is by appointment.
,br/> If you apply for unemployment benefits, designate your employer’s mailing address as:

USNH Benefits Office
5 Chenell Drive, Suite 301
Concord, NH 03301

IMPORTANT! This process may vary if you live and work outside of New Hampshire. See your state’s Division of Unemployment Insurance.
On March 18, 2020, the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (the Act) was signed into law. It includes new rules for group health plan coverage, paid family and medical leave, and paid sick time. The Act is the second coronavirus law passed by Congress.

The Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) requires USNH to provide paid, job-protected leave to you if you are eligible, in response to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.
If you are actively working, including if you are an adjunct or student worker, you are eligible to receive benefits under the FFCRA. To be eligible for paid expanded family and medical leave (expanded FMLA), you must have been employed (been on payroll) by USNH for 30 days before the effective date of the leave. In addition, you must not have already used all your Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) leave in the prior 12 months.
Paid family and medical leave, as well as paid sick leave, are covered for reasons related to COVID-19, as noted below (numbering below is consistent with FFCRA language.)
Leave Reason Duration
FFCRA paid sick leave is available if you are unable to work, including telework, due to the following reasons:
  1. You are subject to a federal, state, or local quarantine or isolation order related to COVID-19.
  2. You have been advised by a health care provider to self- quarantine related to COVID-19.
  3. You are experiencing COVID-19 symptoms and seeking a medical diagnosis.
  4. You are caring for an individual subject to an order described in (1), above, or you are in self-quarantine as described in (2), above.
  5. You are experiencing any other substantially similar condition specified by the Secretary of Health and Human Services, in consultation with the Secretaries of Labor and Treasury.
Up to two weeks of pay
FFCRA expanded family and medical leave (FMLA) is available if you are unable to work, including telework, because:
  1. You have a bona fide need for leave to care for a child whose school or childcare provider is closed or unavailable for reasons related to COVID-19.
Up to two weeks without pay,* plus up to an additional 10 weeks with pay
*You are eligible to use your FFCRA paid sick leave, if you have not used all of it, to cover the first two weeks under an approved FFCRA expanded family and medical leave.
USNH will pay 100% of your regular rate of pay, subject to the following maximums:
  • For reasons (1), (2), and (3) above, USNH will pay up to $511 in base pay per day and $5,110 in aggregate over a two-week period.
  • For reasons (4) and (6) above, USNH will pay up to $200 in base pay per day and $2,000 in aggregate over a two-week period.
  • For reason (5) above, USNH will pay up to $200 in base pay per day and $10,000 in aggregate over a 10-week period. If you are supplementing your first two weeks of unpaid leave with FFCRA, paid sick leave will be capped at $200 per day, bringing the overall maximum to $12,000 for 12 weeks of FMLA.
Important: USNH is providing a greater benefit than the minimum requirements under the Act. So, please refer to this document for the most up-to-date information specific to you (as a USNH employee).
On April 9 , 2020, the Administrative Board approved three temporary policy changes. These include minimum age for early retirement, reduced COBRA rates if elected while on a layoff and a new furlough policy. Each of these are laid out in more detail below.

Note: these policy revisions are not applicable to employees covered by a collective bargaining agreement (CBA).
This new policy allows campuses to place eligible employees, pursuant to a written notice, on an unpaid furlough for up to 120 days (subject to earlier recall based upon business needs.) This benefit will remain in place through 12/31/2020.

While on furlough, employees will continue all current benefits they are enrolled in at their active employee rates. Employees will receive an invoice of premiums due and will be expected to submit payment on a monthly basis. Accrued leave benefits will carry forward to their return to work and they will not have access to lump-sum payouts of any accrued time off. They will be eligible to apply for unemployment benefits while on furlough.

The furlough policy supports our employees through the provision of continued access to healthcare and other benefits and will also allow campuses to maintain an employment relationship with these employees – supporting their ability to return to work quickly if and when business requires it.
New Jersey
Agency Phone Number Website
New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development North New Jersey: 201-601-4100
Central New Jersey: 732-761-2020
South New Jersey: 856-507-2340
Out-of-state Claims: 1-888-795-6672
https://myunemployment.nj.gov/labor/
Most likely yes. The new law that was signed March 27th can provide assistance to many NJ workers impacted by COVID-19. Under the law, there are three types of assistance:
  • Pandemic Unemployment Assistance: expands eligibility for individuals who are typically ineligible for Unemployment benefits, for example independent contractors, and self-employed and “gig” workers.
  • Pandemic Unemployment Compensation: provides an additional $600 per week, on top of regular benefits, to all recipients of Unemployment Insurance; retroactive to the week ending April 4, 2020.
  • Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation: provides an additional 13 weeks of Unemployment benefits to all recipients.
A NJ worker experiencing any of the following COVID-19 scenarios would likely be eligible for Pandemic Unemployment Assistance:
  • diagnosed with COVID-19 or experiencing symptoms and seeking medical diagnosis (please note, NJ is currently awaiting specific guidance from USDOL on this scenario)
  • member of the individual’s household diagnosed with COVID–19
  • providing care for family member or member of household who has been diagnosed with COVID-19
  • individual is primary caregiver for child or family member unable to attend school or another facility closed due to COVID-19
  • unable to reach place of employment due to an imposed quarantine or because advised by medical provider to self-quarantine due to COVID-19
  • was scheduled to commence employment and does not have a job or is unable to reach the job due to COVID-19
  • became breadwinner because the head of household has died from COVID-19
  • quit his or her job as a direct result of COVID-19
  • place of employment is closed due to the COVID-19 public health emergency
  • self-employed / independent contractors / 1099 filers / farmers - and impacted by COVID-19
  • seeking part-time employment but impacted by COVID-19
  • does not have sufficient work history and impacted by COVID-19
  • otherwise not qualified for regular or extended Unemployment benefits and impacted by COVID-19 (please note, NJ is currently awaiting specific guidance from USDOL on this scenario)
  • exhausted all benefits under regular Unemployment and impacted by COVID-19 (but if combined UI and extended benefits reach 39 weeks, no additional benefits are currently available)
You may be eligible for unemployment and should apply online at myunemployment.nj.gov. See our FAQs on “Unemployment: applying, certifying for benefits” for helpful tips. If you are denied, you can always file an appeal, which takes time. If denied, you are also likely eligible for benefits under Pandemic Unemployment Assistance since ineligibility for regular unemployment is a prerequisite for receiving these expanded benefits due to COVID-19.

In this case you will need to gather the last two years of your tax returns or other evidence of income history, which will be necessary for processing your claim once the federal rules are established. The Pandemic Unemployment Assistance benefits can be paid retroactively for periods of unemployment, beginning on or after January 27, 2020. Additional details will be posted online as they become available.
You do not have to do anything except continue to certify weekly to receive the $600/week. The additional $600/week compensation will be issued beginning April 14, for the week of March 30. It will be a separate payment from your regular unemployment benefit, and will be available to those receiving benefits until July 25, 2020. We are awaiting guidance on the 13-week extension of unemployment benefits. Please check back for details.
Yes, under the CARES Act, you are likely eligible for an additional 13 weeks of benefits provided by Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation. Claimants that are eligible for extended benefits will be notified on how to claim these benefits. There is no action required on your part right now; please look for further information in your mail or email.
You are likely eligible under Pandemic Unemployment Assistance. These benefits can be paid retroactively for periods of unemployment, beginning on or after January 27, 2020. See our FAQs below on “Unemployment: applying, certifying for benefits” for helpful tips, and apply online at myunemployment.nj.gov. Additional details will be posted online as they become available.
You are likely eligible under Pandemic Unemployment Assistance but it will depend on your individual circumstances. These benefits can be paid retroactively for periods of unemployment, beginning on or after January 27, 2020. See our FAQs on “Unemployment: applying, certifying for benefits” for helpful tips, and apply online at myunemployment.nj.gov. Additional details will be posted online as they become available.
Yes, if you exhausted your Unemployment benefits, you are likely eligible for 13 additional weeks under Pandemic Unemployment Compensation. However, we are awaiting federal guidance on the specifics of the 13-week extension of unemployment benefits. Please check back frequently for updates.
The CARES Act signed March 27th can provide assistance to many NJ workers impacted by COVID-19 and has expanded Unemployment benefits, making it the optimal choice for many who cannot work due to coronavirus- related circumstances. Please note that you cannot receive benefits from these programs at the same time. Read these FAQs, including #2, and “Unemployment: applying, certifying for benefits” for helpful tips, and apply online at myunemployment.nj.gov.
First visit nj.gov/labor and read about our laws and programs, including Earned Sick Leave, Temporary Disability, and Family Leave. There are helpful guides that you can download and print. NJ Earned Sick Leave, emergency federal paid sick and emergency FMLA childcare leave are paid by your employer directly. Unemployment, Temporary Disability and Family Leave benefits require an application to the State of NJ. Be sure you apply for the program that best fits your situation - applying for the wrong one could cause delays. Please do not apply if you continue to be working your normal hours.
NJ’s Unemployment Insurance system is experiencing record levels of demand due to coronavirus and all in-person services statewide are currently closed due to COVID-19. Some people cannot get through online or on the phone. We understand your anxiety and frustration, and we apologize. We’re working diligently to serve all our customers and ask for your patience. Please keep trying. We’re committed to ensuring that everyone receives their benefits during this crisis. You will not lose a day’s benefits as all claims will be backdated to your first day of employment loss.
Applying online at myunemployment.nj.gov is fastest and we recommend filing in the evening or early in the morning.
  • If there are glitches in DOL’s systems, keep trying.
  • Please note that it’s not possible to save your online application and return to it; you must complete it and submit it all at once.
  • Once you’ve submitted your application, you will receive a confirmation number at the end of your application; please record this. You will receive email instructions on how and when to claim benefits. If you don’t receive an email, you must phone the call center (see numbers below).
All claims have a start date of the Sunday of the week in which the worker files the unemployment application, so there is no rush to file on the day you cannot work. As long as you file by Saturday at 11:59 pm, you will receive credit back to the previous Sunday. If your last day of work is a Friday or Saturday, and you worked the full week, please wait to file until after Sunday. Otherwise, you may inadvertently file for a week when you actually worked.
If you need specific questions answered before you apply, please first review these FAQs and the webpages listed. You can try to reach our Unemployment program on the phone. We’re experiencing record high call volume but we’re working diligently to serve all our customers and ask for your patience.
With so many people filing for Unemployment for the first time, some folks have questions about the procedure for telling the State that you remain under- or unemployed, also known as “certifying for weekly benefits.” Please visit myunemployment.nj.gov and read our guide and schedule for certifying.

Due to high volume, we’re taking steps to ensure the stability of our online application. Each week you certify, check this link below to review the Social Security Number-based schedule to claim weekly benefits.

More Info

Regardless of the time you claim your benefit, your request for payment will be processed overnight.
Unemployment benefits provide 60% of average wages, with a maximum of $713 per week, plus an additional $600 per week through July 25, 2020 due to the CARES Act.
The time to process a claim depends on many factors, including but not limited to number of employers, benefits history, and employment history. Please note the following:
  1. be sure you file for the right benefit program (see nj.gov/labor for information on employer-provided paid leave and other state benefits);
  2. filing online is the fastest;
  3. provide all required information;
  4. the system is experiencing record-high levels of demand. We understand that this can be extremely challenging for many New Jerseyans. We are working as quickly as we can to process claims. You will not lose a day’s benefits as all claims will be backdated to your first day of employment loss.
Visit covid19.nj.gov to locate services that can help you and your family at this time.
You apply in New Jersey at myunemployment.nj.gov.
Please notify the Temporary Disability / Family Leave Insurance division by sending a message via their online form. We are working with the Unemployment Insurance division to find a solution to this technical issue. Please note we are experiencing very high volume due to the coronavirus emergency, but we’re working diligently to serve all our customers and ask for your patience. We understand your frustration and we apologize.

More Info
First visit nj.gov/labor and read about our laws and programs, including Earned Sick Leave, Temporary Disability, and Family Leave. There are helpful guides that you can download and print. NJ Earned Sick Leave, emergency federal paid sick and emergency FMLA childcare leave are paid by your employer directly. Unemployment, Temporary Disability and Family Leave benefits require an application to the State of NJ. Be sure you apply for the program that best fits your situation - applying for the wrong one could cause delays. Please do not apply if you continue to be working your normal hours. If you believe you’re eligible for Unemployment, learn more and apply online at myunemployment.nj.gov.
You are likely eligible for unemployment insurance. Learn more and apply online at myunemployment.nj.gov.
You are likely eligible for Unemployment Insurance. Learn more and apply online at myunemployment.nj.gov.
You are likely eligible for Unemployment Insurance. Learn more and apply online at myunemployment.nj.gov.
You are likely eligible. Eligibility decisions are made on a case-by-case basis. Learn more and apply online at myunemployment.nj.gov.
Yes. Click here for more information on Unemployment Insurance after Temporary Disability or Family Leave Insurance.
This easy-to-understand guide provides a list of COVID-19 scenarios and benefits and programs that may apply.

See additional Unemployment FAQs at myunemployment.nj.gov.
For most New Jersey workers, yes. The only exceptions are federal government and some local municipality workers (for example: public school teachers). Once your healthcare provider determines your pregnancy prevents you from working (typically 4 weeks prior to your due date), notify the Division of Unemployment Insurance to suspend your Unemployment benefits. Next, apply for Temporary Disability Insurance benefits for the period during pregnancy and delivery recovery. Once your Temporary Disability period ends you can apply for NJ Family Leave Insurance to bond with your baby.
In general, you will receive the same weekly benefit amount as you were receiving on your Unemployment Insurance claim. Click here for more information on how benefits are calculated.
Temporary Disability Insurance provides up to 26 weeks of benefits while you are unable to work. Your healthcare provider will determine the date that your medical condition prevents you from working and the duration of leave you will need. Most physicians recommend an expectant mother stop working 4 weeks before her scheduled due date, and that she recover for 6-8 weeks after childbirth.

If your healthcare provider recommends quarantine outside of the above time frame due to your pregnancy and the risk of coronavirus you may be payable for a longer period of time. Your health care provider must provide the pre-existing diagnosis (pregnancy) and the duration you are expected to be out of work. For more information on benefits during pregnancy and newborn bonding click here.
Currently, workers can receive a total of 6 weeks of family leave per year regardless of the reason for leave. In addition to family leave benefits, a worker can also use employer provided paid time off such as NJ earned sick leave and federal emergency sick leave. New Jersey workers have the right to accrue up to 40 hours of earned sick time. For more information on NJ Earned Sick Leave, click here. In addition to New Jersey’s wage replacement program and earned sick leave, you may also qualify for up to 80 hours of Federal emergency paid sick leave to care for a loved one. See NJDOL’s publication What NJ Workers Need to Know About the Families First Coronavirus Response Act for more information.

Please take note that your employer has the ability to count both federal emergency childcare leave and your pregnancy/recovery leave against your total federal job-protection (FMLA) balance of 12 weeks per 12-month period.
Yes. Apply online at myunemployment.nj.gov. Click here for more information on Unemployment Insurance after Temporary Disability, and see the Unemployment Insurance FAQ section above.
Simply apply online at myunemployment.nj.gov. However, if your Family Leave claim was started during a period of unemployment, you will have to call Unemployment Insurance and explain your situation. They will ensure that your Family Leave claim is ended and your UI claim is activated. The Unemployment Insurance program is experiencing record high call volume but we’re working diligently to serve all our customers and ask for your patience.
  • North Jersey: 201-601-4100
  • Central Jersey: 732-761-2020
  • Southern Jersey: 856-507-2340
Please notify the Temporary Disability / Family Leave Insurance division by sending a message via their online form. We are working with the Unemployment Insurance division to find a solution to this technical issue. Please note we are experiencing very high volume due to the coronavirus emergency, but we’re working diligently to serve all our customers and ask for your patience. We understand your frustration and we apologize.
Under the new federal CARES Act, if you cannot work because you are providing care for a family member who has been diagnosed with COVID-19, you are eligible for Unemployment. You do not have to take any action. Continue to certify for your weekly benefits.
The CARES Act signed March 27th can provide assistance to many NJ workers impacted by COVID-19 and has expanded Unemployment benefits, making it the optimal choice for many who cannot work due to coronavirus- related circumstances. Please note that you cannot receive benefits from these programs at the same time. Read these FAQs, including #2, and “Unemployment: applying, certifying for benefits” for helpful tips, and apply online at myunemployment.nj.gov.
You are likely eligible for NJ Earned Sick Leave, and if your employer has less than 500 employees, you are likely eligible for the federal emergency paid sick leave and emergency FMLA childcare leave. If you are no longer receiving pay from your employer, you are also likely eligible for Unemployment Insurance. For more information on NJ Earned Sick Leave, see mysickdays.nj.gov and see NJDOL’s publication What NJ Workers Need to Know About the Families First Coronavirus Response Act.
No, if you use the 12 weeks because your children do not have school or child care, then you will have exhausted your FMLA coverage for the year. But, you may be eligible for NJ benefits.

In NJ, most workers have access to NJ Paid Family & Medical Leave benefits and it is against the law for an employer to retaliate against you for taking these benefits. Although you may not have job protection through FMLA for a leave related to your own medical condition, you may have job protection through the NJ Family Leave Act for a leave related to caregiving for a loved one or bonding with a new child.
It is against the law for an employer to retaliate against you for using or seeking to use your Temporary Disability or Family Leave Insurance benefits. In addition, many NJ workers also have job protection for medical leave under another law, the federal Family and Medical Leave Act, and for family leave under the NJ Family Leave Act. Your NJ Paid Family & Medical Leave period may overlap with your coverage under these laws. It’s also possible that you are eligible for NJ Paid Family & Medical Leave benefits, but not covered under the job protection laws.
As a general matter, employers can set the terms of PTO usage unless there is an employee handbook, union contract, or prior agreement that says otherwise. In the absence of any of those, the company can require it to be used. The NJ Department of Labor enforces Breach of Contract but the contract must be in writing - see nj.gov/labor for more information. An employer may not require you use your PTO before accessing NJ Family Leave Insurance, NJ earned sick leave, or the new federal emergency paid sick leave. See NJDOL’s publication What NJ Workers Need to Know About the Families First Coronavirus Response Act for more information.
Employers pay their employees for the emergency leave, and employers can take advantage of two new refundable payroll tax credits, designed to immediately and fully reimburse employers, dollar-for-dollar, for the cost of providing the leave. For more details, see the IRS website and https://www.dol.gov/agencies/whd/pandemic.
Certain self-employed individuals are also eligible for a tax credit for emergency paid sick and FMLA childcare leave for days they are unable to perform services in any trade or business. For more details, see https://www.dol.gov/agencies/whd/pandemic.
You can use the new federal emergency paid leaves for leave taken between April 1st and December 31st, 2020. They are not retroactive.
No, if you use the 12 weeks because your children do not have school or child care, then you will have exhausted your FMLA coverage for the year. But, you may be eligible for NJ benefits. In NJ, most workers have access to NJ Paid Family & Medical Leave benefits and it is against the law for an employer to retaliate against you for taking these benefits. Although you may not have job protection through FMLA for a leave related to your own medical condition, you may have job protection through the NJ Family Leave Act for a leave related to caregiving for a loved one or bonding with a new child.
As a NJ worker, you are likely eligible for NJ Paid Family & Medical Leave benefits through NJ’s family leave insurance program. Family leave insurance provides partial wage replacement benefits during the time you need to care for an ill loved one.
New Mexico
Agency Phone Number Website
New Mexico Department of Workforce Solutions 1-877-664-6984 https://www.jobs.state.nm.us/vosnet/Default.aspx

For all separations related to COVID-19, New Mexico needs integrated partners to use Code 18 "Disaster Related Separation" in B-20 and include comments in B-33 that the work stoppage is due to COVID-19.

Unemployment Insurance (UI) claims are processed by the New Mexico Department of Workforce Solutions (NMDWS), and there are two ways to file an unemployment claim:
Whether you file online or by phone, you will need the following information to file a new claim:
  • Social Security Number (SSN)
  • Mailing address and phone number(s) of employer(s) you worked for in last 18 months
  • The starting and ending dates of your last job (or jobs if more than one employer in last 18 months)
  • If you are a non-citizen, have your alien registration number and expiration date
  • If you worked during the week you are filing your claim, be sure you know the gross amount (total dollars and cents before any deductions) of your pay before filing
  • Pencil and paper to write down questions and instructions
NMDWS is waiving the work search requirements through the end of April. After you have applied for benefits, you must file a weekly certification for each week for which you are applying for benefits. Weekly certifications may be filed online or by phone.
If you need to file a new claim for benefits, you may do so Sunday-Friday, 24 hours a day, online at www.jobs.state.nm.us, or over the phone at 1-877-664-6984 Monday-Friday, 7:00am-7:00pm.
If you have been directed to self-quarantined or are taking care of an immediate family member that is quarantined due to COVID-19, and you have a return to work date, the separation reason you would select on your claim is “Leave of Absence.” If you answer that it is paid leave of absence, you will be found ineligible for benefits because you are still receiving payment from your employer. If you answer that you are not receiving payment you will potentially be eligible to receive benefits.

If you do not have a return to work date, please select Discharged/Lack of Work due to COVID-19.

Certain questions within the questionnaire are dependent on the first answer you provide. If you say “yes” that your employer posted the information in the workplace about your right to file a claim, you should skip the next question. You would only complete the next question if you answered “no” to the question “Did you know you could file for benefits?” Read each question and instructions carefully when filling out questionnaires.
NMDWS is waiving the work search requirements through the end of April. After you have applied for benefits, you must file a weekly certification for each week for which you are applying for benefits. Weekly certifications may be filed online or by phone.
The work search requirement is being waived through the end of April. The department will advise claimants if the waiver will be extended beyond that time.
No, you do not need to be able and available as the work search requirement is being waived through the end of April. The department will advise claimants if the waiver will be extended beyond that time.
No, you do not need to be able and available as the work search requirement is being waived through the end of April. The department will advise claimants if the waiver will be extended beyond that time.
You can check what pending issue you have by logging into your unemployment insurance account, selecting the menu option “View and Maintain Account Information” and then select “Issues and Determinations”. Scroll down towards the bottom of your screen and you can see what is pending. Please be advised that the department adjudicates issues in the order they are received.
UPDATE: Under guidance from the U.S. Department of Labor, NMDWS will waive the “waiting week” for claimants who have applied for benefits since March 15th. By waiving the waiting week, claimants will receive an extra week of benefit payments to their accounts while allowing for new applicants to receive their benefits faster.
You may be eligible if the situations described below apply to you:
  • Employers may lay off some or all of their workforce as a result of the impact of COVID-19; for example, a restaurant that sees a significant reduction in business due to lack of customers dining out during this time, or an event facility that cancels all events until a later date, or bus drivers who are out of work due to temporary school closures.
  • Workers who are self-quarantined or directed to be quarantined, or who have immediate family who is quarantined.
  • Workers who have their hours reduced as a result of COVID-19.
In the event that you are unable to work because your child’s school or child care is closed for reasons related to COVID-19, you may be eligible for unemployment benefits. Quitting your job outright is not considered good cause to resign. An employee must take reasonable steps to preserve their employment, such as requesting an alternate schedule or a leave of absence. However, if the employer discharges the employee for making the request, the leave of absence is granted, or the employee’s hours are reduced, the employee may be eligible for benefits, if all other eligibility requirements are met.
Regardless if you were full-time or part-time and have your hours reduced you will be eligible for unemployment benefits as long as your earnings are under your weekly benefit amount. Please remember that all earnings must be reported on your weekly certifications at the time the wages were earned, not when they are paid.
Under New Mexico law quitting because of a medical concern is not considered good cause. The department encourages you to work with your employer to discuss options to limit your exposure.
If you have been asked to self-quarantined, are admitted into the hospital, or are caring for a family member who is quarantined as a result of COVID-19 you may apply for unemployment benefits.
Yes, if you are unable to work as a result of the schools being closed due to COVID-19 you may apply for unemployment insurance benefits.
Yes, you can file for unemployment insurance benefits if you have been separated as a direct result of COVID-19.
Drivers for Lift and Uber are self-employed and would only be eligible for benefits if they have worked for another employer whose wages are part of your base period. If the federal government institutes DUA (Disaster Unemployment Assistance), a self-employed individual could be eligible for benefits.
The department does not deny anyone the right to file a claim for unemployment benefits. Asking someone to work without providing any payment is a violation of the law and you should submit a wage claim to the New Mexico Wage and Hour Bureau to receive payment for hours worked.
We understand that federal lawmakers have passed a COVID-19 stimulus bill that will expand Unemployment Insurance benefits. Once the department is provided with instructions on how to obtain additional funds from the Federal Government, we will make an announcement through news outlets and on the department website about benefit eligibility for independent contractors, those who are self-employed, and business owners who will soon be able to apply for Pandemic Unemployment Assistance.
Drivers for Lift and Uber are self-employed and would only be eligible for benefits if they have worked for another employer whose wages are part of your base period. If the federal government institutes DUA (Disaster Unemployment Assistance), a self-employed individual could be eligible for benefits.
Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation (FPUC) provides individuals who are collecting UI benefits an additional $600 per week. The FPUC additional benefit will be paid on weeks of unemployment beginning March 29, 2020, and will end on July 25, 2020.
The Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation (FPUC) benefit will be paid on a weekly basis on eligible Unemployment Insurance weeks beginning March 29 and ending July 25, 2020. All claimants will receive these payments for weeks they are eligible for regular UI benefits.
If you haven’t submitted your claim, the system will allow you to modify any information you have already entered on your claim. If you want to add another employer and have already submitted your claim, you must call the Operations Center at 1-877-664-6984, Monday through Friday, 7:00am – 7:00pm.

If you want to add a dependent and have already submitted your claim, go to your Home Page, select “View and Maintain Account Information” from the left-side menu, in the drop-down menu, select “Dependent Information” option and then add the dependent(s) on the screen provided.

If you want to change from debit card to direct deposit (or vice versa), go to your Home Page, select “View and Maintain Account Information” from the left-side menu, from the drop-down menu select “Payment Method Options and Tax Information.” From the Payment Methods Options and Tax Information, select the “Edit” button and make your change.
First, you will need to make sure your internet browsers are closed. From the email you received, select the link to reset password. You must physically type in the temporary password (rather than copy and paste) from the email you received and then the system should allow you to change the password.
Yes, your old account is still available. If the error message is on the Unemployment Insurance Tax & Claims System, type in your Social Security Number (SSN) and then select “Forgot Password.” If the error message is on your “My Workforce Connection” account, select “Forgot Username/Password” and follow the prompts.

If you had an unemployment insurance claim prior to 2013 and have never logged into it online, enter your SSN and the last four digits of your SSN as your password. You will then be prompted to set up a password. Once your new password is set up, it will take you back to the login screen to enter in your SSN and new password.

If you have previously logged in but do not remember your password, please enter in your SSN and then select “forgot password”.
No. Unemployment Insurance benefits are funded by an employer tax. It is against the law for employers to deduct unemployment taxes from your wages.
Use this helpful tool to find answers to frequently asked questions about letters you may receive.
UPDATE: Under guidance from the U.S. Department of Labor, NMDWS will waive the “waiting week” for claimants who have applied for benefits since March 15th. By waiving the waiting week, claimants will receive an extra week of benefit payments to their accounts while allowing for new applicants to receive their benefits faster.
No, you would not be eligible to receive payment if you are serving compensable weeks due to a prior fraud determination until all compensable weeks are served.
Log in to your online account (www.jobs.state.nm.us) regularly to check for any correspondence from the department. You will remain responsible for any communication from NMDWS including requests for information and responses to notices of determination, hearings or decisions issued by the Department.
Starting Wednesday, April 8, 2020, the Unemployment Insurance Operations Center has implemented extended hours. The Operations Center will open at 7am and take calls until 7pm.

The department continues to strongly encourage anyone with internet access to apply and complete weekly certifications using our website at www.jobs.state.nm.us
If the system has reached the maximum calls in the regular queue and the call back telephone queue, the system has no other option than to hang up. We apologize for the system issues, but due to the large volume of calls received each day the system is working at capacity.
At this time, New Mexico has not met USDOL’s qualifications to offer extended benefits. If/when New Mexico does qualify to offer these benefits, eligible claimants will be notified.
USDOL has not declared an approval to offer DUA benefits at this time.
UPDATE: Under guidance from the U.S. Department of Labor, NMDWS will waive the “waiting week” for claimants who have applied for benefits since March 15th. By waiving the waiting week, claimants will receive an extra week of benefit payments to their accounts while allowing for new applicants to receive their benefits faster.
When you file your claim, your weekly benefit amount will be based on the 2019 quarter in which you earned the most, rather than being based on your hourly wage rate.
Claimants in New Mexico may receive up to $461 per week, based on the 2019 quarter in which they earned the most. This is separate from the Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation (FPUC). Claimants may also receive $25 for up to 2 qualified dependents under the age of 18.
If the separation is a layoff (lack of work), the employer does not need to respond during this crisis. If the separation is any other type, the employer will need to respond.
North Carolina
Agency Phone Number Website
North Carolina Department of Commerce 1-888-737-0259 https://des.nc.gov/

North Carolina would like your assistance. Please send an email to our integrated partners with the following instructions regarding separations due to the Coronavirus.  Request partners report  temporary closures, in Data Element B-20 as code 1 “Temporary Layoff “ and include comments in Data Element B-33 “ that the work stoppage is due to Coronavirus.”  Report reduction in hours in Data Element B-20 as code 11 “ Still Employed, Hours Reduced by employer” and include comments in Data Element B-33 that the reduction in hours  due to Coronavirus initiated by employer or staff inability to work due to Coronavirus.

If you have any questions please contact me. Review the Governor's executive order regarding non-charging for employers.

If you are laid off work temporarily or if your hours are reduced due to a business slowdown or a lack of demand as a result of COVID-19, you may be able to receive unemployment benefits. In order to determine eligibility, you must first apply for unemployment. If you're temporarily out of work or working reduced hours due to COVID-19, select one of those two separation reasons when filing your claim.
You may be eligible for unemployment benefits if you're laid off. If you're out of work due to COVID-19, indicate that while filing your claim.
If you are not receiving payment from your employer, such as paid sick leave or paid time off, you may be eligible for unemployment benefits during this time. If you are laid off work temporarily or if your hours are reduced due to a business slowdown or a lack of demand as a result of COVID-19, you may be able to receive unemployment benefits. In order to determine eligibility, you must first apply for unemployment. If you're temporarily out of work or working reduced hours due to COVID-19, select one of those two separation reasons when filing your claim.
The first and best option for employees who need to miss work due to illness is to use their employer­paid time off.
If your employer is not offering paid time off, you should apply for unemployment insurance. If you are laid off work temporarily or if your hours are reduced due to a business slowdown or a lack of demand as a result of COVID-19, you may be able to receive unemployment benefits. In order to determine eligibility, you must first apply for unemployment. If you're temporarily out of work or working reduced hours due to COVID-19, please select one of those two separation reasons when filing your claim.
Anyone can file for unemployment insurance. In order to determine eligibility, you must first apply for unemployment. If you're temporarily out of work or working reduced hours due to COVID-19, please select one of those two separation reasons when filing your claim.
When filing for unemployment insurance, an employee must provide information about their decision to leave the job. In order to determine eligibility, you must first apply for unemployment.
Individuals currently filing for unemployment insurance benefits who have to quarantine due to COVID-19 will be considered able and available to work as long as the individual has not removed themselves from the labor market.
No, please contact the unit who scheduled the appointment or our Customer Call Center for other options to complete your appointment.
If you are out of work as a result of COVID-19, you do not have to conduct a work search while filing for unemployment.
Independent contractors and self-employed workers are typically not covered. In order to be eligible, workers must have held a job considered covered employment.
The fastest and most efficient way to file a new claim is to file online at des.nc.gov. If you don't have access to a computer, you may file over the phone by calling 888-737-0259.
Employers who wish to file claims for employees must meet the requirements of employment security law. Employers who wish to file for their employees (attached claims) must:
  • Have a positive DES Employer Account balance
  • Pre-pay for all weeks filed on behalf of employees
  • Only file an Attached Claim one time per year
  • Only file for six weeks, and then employees must file UI Claims for themselves
Yes. The Department of Commerce Division of Employment Security has been directed to not allocate charges to employers' accounts for individuals who are paid benefits for reasons related to COVID-19. Employers responding to requests for separation information should indicate that the separation was due to COVID-19.
A business owner required to pay unemployment insurance taxes for him/herself may be eligible.
Independent contractors and self-employed workers are typically not covered. In order to be eligible, workers must have held a job considered covered employment.
If you have employees working intermittently {for example, one week on, one week off), they must report their gross earning for the week in which they did the work, not the week in which they were paid, when filing for unemployment benefits.
The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services is providing updates on COVID-19 in North Carolina on its website.
North Dakota
Agency Phone Number Website
North Dakota Job Service 701-328-4995 https://www.jobsnd.com/unemployment-individuals/
With the passage of the CARES Act those who have current Benefit Year Ends and have exhausted their benefits would most likely be eligible to receive the PEUC extension of 13 additional weeks of regular UI. Other regular claims would be potentially eligible for PEUC at the point they exhaust. We are awaiting guidance on claims where the benefit year has expired and how they might be processed.

CARES Act – Unemployment Insurance Benefits

The CARES Act includes expansion of unemployment insurance benefits:
  • Expands eligibility for unemployment insurance and provides people with an additional $600 per week on top of the unemployment amount already offered by North Dakota Unemployment benefits.
    • Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) – provides an additional 13 weeks of benefits for regular claims that exhaust benefits and whose benefit year has not expired
      • Weekly benefit amount is the same as what was paid on the regular claim
      • Eligible to receives the $600 supplemental payment for each week certified
    • Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA)
      • Available to those who do not qualify for a regular unemployment claim
      • Receives the $600 supplemental payment for each week certified and found eligible
  • The additional unemployment compensation provided is not considered “income” for purposes of Medicaid and CHIP
Yes. Governor Burgum signed an Executive Order on Friday, March 20th to assist business owners in the receipt of Unemployment Insurance by temporarily eliminating income reduction requirements for business owners.
No. Governor Burgum signed an Executive Order on Friday, March 20th directing that individual base period employers accounts for rated employers will be relieved of charges (I.e. No Charged) on claims filed as a direct or indirect result of COVID-19. Employers who have chosen reimbursement as their method of financing are not eligible for non-charging / pool charging of benefits at this time
Yes, generally your employees will be eligible for benefits, if they cannot report for work because they no longer have childcare available to them.
Included in the CARES Act is Pandemic Unemployment Assistance which is a program for those who do not qualify for regular unemployment benefits.

You can apply here for PUA benefits. Please know that the applications for these benefits will not be processed until the federal government provides guidance to the states on implementing this new program.
Yes, if you are quarantined and physically able to work but cannot work from the quarantine location do to other reasons, you would be eligible to receive benefits based upon recent federal guidance relating strictly to COVID-19.
Yes, if you cannot work due to contracting COVID-19 but will be returning to your employer, you would be eligible to receive benefits based upon recent federal guidance relating strictly to COVID-19.
If your employer shuts down or lays you off due to lack of work caused by the impact of COVID-19 on the business, you will generally be eligible for Unemployment Insurance benefits.
No. Governor Burgum signed an Executive Order on Friday, March 20th that temporarily waives the work search requirement for all claimants. Job Service has adjusted our systems so that you will not be asked to enter any work searches you have completed when you certify your weekly eligibility.
The waiting week is a one-week delay between the date a claim is filed and the date of the first payment issued. It has been built into the Job Service North Dakota mainframe since before online filing became commonplace. It allows Job Service to verify statements made on claims and is a tool in the fight against insurance fraud. Governor Burgum waived the waiting week on April 1, 2020 in an executive order.
Yes, as of April 1. Waiting week payments began going out the week of April 5, and will be back-paid to all claims filed March 8 through April 4.

More Info
Waiving the waiting week does not increase the amount of money an individual will be eligible to receive; however, it does help get benefit payments into the hands of claimants sooner.

All individuals filing claims with a week ending date of March 14 and going through the duration of this pandemic situation WILL NOT be required to serve a waiting week
No, the benefit payment will be automatic, so individuals do not have to contact Job Service to ask about it or receive it. In fact, citizens are encouraged NOT to call Job Service about it simply because of the call volume they are currently experiencing.
No, all individuals filing unemployment insurance claims will have their waiting week waived. Remember, this does not increase or decrease the benefit amount people receive, it simply speeds the process for receipt of that benefit.
Because of the many programming changes associated with new programs introduced in the CARES Act, Job Service North Dakota recognizes the critical need to get each of these programs in place. We had to prioritize the order of programming all while weighing the risk of complete system failure, which could have resulted in the inability to provide any individual a benefit payments at all. We also took into account the fact that no benefits would be lost by anyone if we could not find a way to program it.

At this time, the federal government still has not provided the guidance necessary to program the new CARES Act programs and has told the states not to act until they have completed it. We have updated our systems to accept claim applications to PUA and PEUC but will not be processing these types of applications until we receive guidance from the US Department of Labor.

We have waived the waiting week and are currently back paying UI claims filed March 8 through April 4.
There are several reasons your claim could be denied, but it is important to remember that with the new federal Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) and Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC), almost all individuals will be eligible for benefits if they are unemployed due to the pandemic. The federal government considers PUA and PEUC to be programs of last resort. This means that they are only available to individuals who are not eligible for regular state unemployment insurance, or those who have been denied regular state unemployment insurance.

Following are some details explaining why you may have been denied regular UI benefits and what you should do next:
  • Your earnings do not qualify you for regular unemployment insurance benefits
  • You filed a claim less than a year ago but you have used up all of your benefits (exhausted your claim)
  • You are unemployed for a reason other than the pandemic
    • If you are unemployed for a reason not related to the pandemic, you will need to follow normal procedures in place for state unemployment insurance benefits (click “File a Regular UI Claim”). The most common reasons for these types of denials will be if you quit a job or were terminated by your employer. You will be notified of your eligibility with a Non-Monetary Determination. This determination will provide you with information and actions you should take if you do not agree with the determination.
New York
Agency Phone Number Website
New York Department of Labor 1-888-209-8124 https://applications.labor.ny.gov/IndividualReg/
Unemployment insurance (also known as UI) provides temporary cash benefits to employees who have lost their jobs. If you have worked in New York State within the last 18 months and lost your job, through no fault of your own, you may be eligible for UI.
A person’s benefit rate is based on the recent wages they received from their employer(s). The current maximum weekly benefit rate is $504.
Currently, the limit is 26 weeks per year. The federal government recently created a new program called Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation that would allow claimants who exhaust their regular UI benefits, to receive up to 13 additional weeks of benefits.
You can file a claim by visiting labor.ny.gov. You can also call the Telephone Claim Center at 888-209-8124. Due to larger than normal call volume, we are strongly encouraging individuals wishing to file a claim to first visit the website, if possible.
You should file your claim in the first week you worked less than four days and earned a gross income of less than $504. If you worked four or more days or earned more than $504, you should file the following week.
You will receive all benefits to which you are entitled. Your claim will start on the day you were separated from your employer. There is unprecedented call volume and web traffic. Please be patient and keep trying. It is best to apply online.
Yes, you will receive all benefits to which you are entitled. Yourclaim will start on the day you were separated from your employer, and DOL will backdate any claims that are not timely processed due to any issues with the DOL website or UI call center.
Typically, the first full week of a claim is an unpaid waiting week. This means you are not paid but you must still claim weekly benefits and fulfill eligibility requirements. Beginning March 12, 2020, the Governor has suspended the one-week waiting period for individuals impacted by the COVID-19 public health crisis.

This means that if you are found eligible for benefits, you will be credited from the first week of your claim (not the second week). It does not mean that you will be paid as soon as you open your claim.
If you are eligible for UI, your first payment will generally be made in two to three weeks from the time you file your claim. In some cases, additional information must be obtained before payment can be made and your first payment may take longer. We use this time to review and process your application for benefits.

You will not receive benefits during this period. Continue to claim weekly benefits as long as you are unemployed and meet the eligibility requirements. Also, check your mail and respond to any questionnaires or phone calls from DOL, right away, to prevent delays in your payments. If you are found eligible, you will receive any back weeks of benefits owed with your first payment. Youwill receive your benefits via direct deposit or bank debit card.
It depends. If you work less than four days a week and earn $504/week or less, you may be eligible to receive partial UI benefits.
If you work less than four days in a week and earn $504 or less, you may receive partial benefits. Each day, or part of a day, of work causes your weekly benefit rate to drop by one-quarter.
You should file a claim if you have been laid off from your job. Our goal is to ensure benefits are paid to all people who apply and are legally entitled to receive them.
Currently, most self-employed individuals and independent contractors working in New York State are not authorized to obtain unemployment insurance benefits. However, self-employed individuals and independent contractors may be eligible for benefits under PUA. PUA is available for individuals who would normally not be eligible for regular unemployment benefits but are unable to work because of COVID-19.

PUA is available for periods of unemployment between January 27, 2020 and December 31, 2020. The maximum benefit rate is $504, the same as the maximum benefit rate for regular unemployment insurance benefits. The minimum PUA rate is calculated by USDOL, quarterly, as 50% of the average weekly benefit amount in each state. For January 1, 2020 – March 31, 2020, the minimum benefit rate is $172. For April 1, 2020 – June 30, 2020, the minimum benefit rate is $182.
Self-employed individuals impacted by COVID-19 may apply for PUA benefits.
While you are only eligible for unemployment insurance benefits if you are able and available to work, under PUA you can receive benefits if you are the primary caregiver for a child whose school or care facility closed due to COVID-19.

PUA is available for periods of unemployment between January 27, 2020 and December 31, 2020. The minimum PUA benefit rate is 50% of the average weekly benefit amount in New York. For January 1, 2020 – March 31, 2020, the minimum benefit rate is $172. For April 1, 2020 – June 30, 2020, the minimum benefit rate is $182. The maximum benefit rate is $504, the same as the maximum benefit rate for regular unemployment insurance benefits.
Probably not, if you are still employed. However, the Governor recently passed a law that provides job protection and paid leave for individuals who are subject to an order of quarantine or isolation by a governmental entity because of COVID-19.

You can learn more information here: ny.gov/COVIDpaidsickleave. There are also additional protections for workers who are sick or have been directed to quarantine. For more information, please visit the New York State Department of Health’s COVID-19 website at: ny.gov/coronavirus.
The federal government recently created three new programs related to unemployment insurance compensation and COVID-19: Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (“PUA”); Pandemic Unemployment Compensation (additional $600/week of benefits); and Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (additional 13 weeks of benefits for claimants who have exhausted benefits). Additional information on these programs is available at: labor.ny.gov.
Generally speaking, you are not eligible for unemployment insurance if you voluntarily leave your job. Before leaving work, please consider speaking with your employer for alternatives that may be available such as using sick time or annual leave, requesting a reasonable accommodation such as working remotely, asking your employer for a leave of absence, or seeking temporary disability benefits.

If alternative options are not available, you may file a claim for unemployment insurance. You should consider obtaining medical documentation that identifies any work restrictions and submit that with your claim. If you are found ineligible for unemployment insurance benefits, you may be eligible for benefits under PUA.
You must continue to contact the Telephone Claims Center at 1-888-209-8124 : this is the only way to complete your claim (you cannot complete this portion of your claim online).
Call 1-800-833-3000. Select language, then press 2.
You must call the Telephone Claims Center at 1-888-209-8124 and speak with an agent. This is the only way to reset your PIN.
State law provides all workers with the right to file for unemployment and the labor law provides that an employer cannot retaliate against a worker’s engagement in a protected activity.
Individuals are eligible for PUA if they do not qualify for regular UI benefits (including self-employed workers and independent contractors) and cannot work because they:
  • Are diagnosed COVID-19 or have COVID-19 symptoms and are seeking diagnosis;
  • Have a member of the household who is diagnosed with COVID-19;
  • Are providing care for a family or household member diagnosed with COVID-19;
  • Are the primary caregiver for a child whose school or care facility closed, due to COVID-19;
  • Are unable to reach their place of employment due to an imposed quarantine, or because advised by medical provider to self-quarantine, due to COVID-19;
  • Were scheduled to start new employment and cannot reach the workplace as direct result of COVID-19;
  • Became the major breadwinner because the head of household died from COVID-19;
  • Quit their job as a direct result of COVID-19;
  • Had their place of employment closed as a direct result of COVID-19; or
  • Meet any additional criteria specified by U.S. Secretary of Labor.
Individuals are not eligible for PUA if they can telework or are receiving paid sick leave or other paid leave benefits (regardless of meeting a category listed above).
Youcan file a PUA application online at labor.ny.gov. Please note, you cannot apply for PUA until you have been determined ineligible for UI benefits. You must apply for UI before you apply for PUA.
Your benefit rate is based on your recent wages. In New York, the current maximum weekly benefit rate is $504. The minimum PUA benefit rate is 50% of the average weekly benefit amount in New York. For January 27, 2020 - March 31, 2020, the minimum benefit rate is $172. For April 1, 2020 - June 30, 2020, the minimum benefit rate is $182.
Yes. PUA benefits will include an additional $600 per week until July 31, 2020.
No, there is no weeklong wait period for PUA.
PUA benefits may cover periods of unemployment up to 39 weeks.
Yes, PUA benefits can be paid retroactively for periods of unemployment, beginning on or after January 27, 2020.
No. If you are being paid to work remotely, you are not eligible for PUA benefits.
Nothing. The additional $600 per week will be automatically added to all regular UI and PUA benefits.
No. The additional $600 per week benefit will not reduce any UI or PUA benefits.
The additional $600 per week benefit ends July 31, 2020.
The additional $600 per week payment will not be counted towards your income eligibility for Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP).
If you exhaust your 26 weeks of regular UI, you will receive an additional 13 weeks of additional benefits.
Yes. Anyone who exhausted UI benefits after July 1, 2019 is eligible to receive 13 additional weeks of benefits.
Yes. The additional 13 weeks of benefits will include an additional $600 per week until July 31, 2020.
Ohio
Agency Phone Number Website
Ohio Department of Job and Family Services 1-877-644-6562 http://jfs.ohio.gov/ouio/index.stm
Ohio has two ways to apply:
  • Online
    • File online unemployment.ohio.gov 24 hours/day, 7 days a week.
      Note that we are experiencing slow processing times due to high claims activity.
  • Telephone
    • Call toll-free 1-877-644-6562 or TTY 1-614-387-8408.
      EXTENDED CALL CENTER HOURS: Agents are available to assist with PIN resets and take initial applications Monday through Friday 7 AM - 7 PM, Saturday 9 AM - 5 PM, and Sunday 9 AM - 1 PM.

      For any other calls, regular business hours are: Monday through Friday, 8 AM - 5 PM.
It is not possible to apply for unemployment benefits in person.
If you filed before receiving the number, no need to worry. Your claim will still be processed, and your benefits will not be delayed. Please do not attempt to adjust your application.
You may qualify for an additional 13 weeks of Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation benefits under the federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, which was signed into law on March 27. The benefit amount will be similar to traditional unemployment benefits, plus an additional $600. Necessary system programming to enable these benefits is underway. Benefits will be retroactive to the date claimants became eligible.
Use numbers only when entering the account and routing number. Do not enter special characters or letters. Also, do not copy and paste the account or routing number.
If your PIN is not working or if you have been locked out, you must speak with an ODJFS staff member to verify your identity and request a new temporary PIN. Please call 1-866-962-4064 for assistance. Staff are available 7 AM - 7 PM weekdays, 9 AM to 5 PM on Saturdays, and 9 AM - 1 PM on Sundays. To find the phone number of your processing center, visit here.
Our apologies for that. You will need to either speak to an agent or else get help via the website’s chat feature. Call center hours have been extended to Monday through Friday 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Saturdays 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sundays 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The number is 877-644-6562.
Claimant Affidavits are used when additional information is needed regarding the number of weeks you worked or the amount of wages you earned. It is important that you review the affidavit carefully and send the requested information as soon as possible. If you dispute the weeks and wages reported by your employer – or if you add missing weeks, wages, or employers to Item 2 on the affidavit – you must include proof of weeks/wages with your response.

Please do not return the form if you do not have additions or corrections. Email the completed affidavit and documentation to UI_Respond@jfs.ohio.gov. You also could fax it to the number listed on the form.
Yes, you can use the web browser on your mobile devise to apply online. Please use caution when entering information to make sure that what you type is accurate, including your Social Security number and bank account number.
Once you file your application for unemployment, you cannot claim a week of benefits until the week has ended on Saturday at midnight. Instructions for claiming your first week are included on the New Claim Instruction Sheet, which all claimants receive after their applications are processed.
You may see correspondence in your account before they are actually available to view. Typically, you will be able to view them once you receive an email notification that the correspondence is available. However, the high claims volume has caused delays in correspondence processing, and our system generated email notifications before correspondence was available to view.

If you received an email on March 27 or before notifying you of a new correspondence, that correspondence might not be available yet. If you receive an email on March 28 or later, that correspondence is ready to view.
An executive order issued by Governor DeWine expands flexibility for Ohioans to receive unemployment benefits during Ohio's emergency declaration period.

Unemployment benefits will be available for eligible individuals who are requested by a medical professional, local health authority, or employer to be isolated or quarantined as a consequence of COVID-19, even if they are not actually diagnosed with COVID-19. In addition, the waiting period for eligible Ohioans to receive unemployment benefits will be waived.
Yes, if the employees are otherwise eligible. An executive order issued by Governor DeWine expands flexibility for Ohioans to receive unemployment benefits during Ohio's emergency declaration period.
Currently, self-employed individuals and 1099 contractors are not eligible for unemployment benefits. However, the new federal Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) program will provide up to 39 weeks of benefits to self-employed workers, 1099 tax filers, and some other individuals who previously were not eligible for unemployment benefits. The benefit amount will be similar to traditional unemployment benefits, plus an additional $600. The program’s effective date is Jan. 27 through Dec. 31.

This is a new program, which we look forward to implementing. Like other states, Ohio is waiting for further guidance from the U.S. Department of Labor on how to operationalize it. Once it is up and running, retroactive benefits will be provided. We will share more information as soon as we have it.
Individuals who are laid off because of a COVID-19-related businesses closure may be eligible for benefits. Some child care facilities may be affiliated with churches or other organizations that are not required by law to pay unemployment insurance taxes. In those cases, the individual may not be in “covered employment” and may not be able to establish a valid claim.
The federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, which was signed into law on March 27, creates a new program that provides benefits to individuals who historically have not qualified for unemployment compensation. The Pandemic Unemployment Assistance Program authorizes benefits for individuals who have been partially or totally unemployed due to COVID-19. The benefit amount will be similar to traditional unemployment benefits, plus an additional $600. This new program is being built. Once it is up and running, benefits for eligible individuals will be retroactive to Jan. 27, for a period of up to 39 weeks.
Individuals who are partially unemployed due to lack of work may be eligible for benefits. Any earnings from employment during the week claimed may reduce the amount of benefits paid. Earnings equal to or less than 20% of the claimant’s weekly benefit amount will not reduce the amount of benefits paid. Earnings over 20% of the weekly benefit amount will reduce the benefit payment dollar for dollar. Earnings equal to or over the benefit amount will result in no benefits for that week.
It’s possible, if they had at least 20 weeks of employment and earned an average weekly wage of $269 during the base period of the claim. See Question 8 for the definition of a base period.
Unemployment compensation is designed to be a partial replacement of earnings rather than a total compensation for lost wages. An individual may be considered partially unemployed due to the loss of one job, but eligibility for payments will be dependent on earnings for each week of benefits claimed.

If earnings for the week are 20% or less of the claimant’s weekly benefit amount, then the full weekly amount may be payable. Earnings over 20% of the weekly benefit amount will reduce the payment dollar for dollar. If the weekly earnings are equal to or greater than the weekly benefit amount, then no benefit will be payable.
Yes, an executive order issued by Governor DeWine states that employees who are quarantined are considered to be unemployed.
In most cases, no. Unemployment benefits are available to individuals who are totally or partially unemployed due to no fault of their own. In this example, the individual-not the employer-is choosing not to work and, therefore, would be ineligible. However, the facts of each circumstance are important. If the employer allowed this individual to telework, they would not qualify for benefits because they would not be unemployed. If the employer required the individual to stay home but did not offer telework, the individual might be eligible for benefits if they met the monetary and weekly eligibility criteria.
At this time, no. If asymptomatic individuals remove themselves from employment – as opposed to an employer or medical professional removing them from employment – they are not be eligible for benefits.
We apologize for your difficulties. The high claims volume has slowed processing times, but our unemployment team is working hard to process claims and distribute payments as quickly as possible. They are adding more customer service representatives and have expanded call center hours to 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays, and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sundays. In addition, all benefits will be retroactive to the date claimants became eligible.

Please know that each claim is important to us. We understand the frustration the website and call center issues have caused during what is already a stressful time. We also understand the urgency of providing Ohioans with the resources they need to support their families. We are grateful for everyone’s patience as we build our capacity to process this unprecedented number of claims and assist all the Ohioans who need help.
No, during this emergency, the requirement that claimants actively search for work each week that they receive benefits has been waived. However, claimants still must be “able and available for work.”
No. Both programs have been suspended until further notice.
Yes. Please enter the expired driver’s license number in the required field. At this time, no claim will be stopped as a result of an expired license.
At this time, no, but please continue to check back for updates. Additional information and support for Ohioans can be found here.
You can do that online. Just log into your account here and look for that option on the main menu.
The weekly benefit amount is typically half the claimant’s previous wages up to a set maximum. For more detailed information, see page 19 of the Worker’s Guide to Unemployment Insurance.
No. Individuals must have at least 20 weeks of employment and an average weekly wage of $269 during the base period of the claim. The base period is the first four of the last five completed calendar quarters at the time the claim is filed. (Claims filed in March would be calculated on the four quarters beginning October 1, 2018, through September 30, 2019. For a detailed explanation of the base period, see pages 14-16 of the Worker’s Guide to Unemployment Insurance.
Claimants may receive up to 26 weeks of benefits a year. Currently, we have no extension of benefits in place.
Call your local Social Security office. To find the number, visit here. When speaking with Social Security staff, request a “Numi Lite” form, which is a verification of your Social Security number. You can then email this form to UI_Respond@jfs.ohio.gov.
No, the only dependents that may be claimed for the purposes of unemployment are natural children, stepchildren, and adopted children.
No.
For the time being, you should continue with the application process using your former name. At the same time, you will need to submit proof of your name change, such as a copy of your Social Security card or your marriage license. You can send it either via email to UI_Respond@jfs.ohio.gov or by fax to 614-466-7449. It is recommended that you also include your former information in addition to the new information when sending in your request for a name change.
That depends how the employer reported the employee’s wages. If the employer reported tips as part of the employees wage, it would be reflected on their tax reporting and therefore the UI benefit would be based on wage with tips. If the employer did not include tips in the wage, the employee will need to file an affidavit with their tipped wages for ODJFS to review.
Tips should be included in reported earnings. Employers report quarterly earnings, which include the tips that employees report for each pay period. Those reports are used to determine the claimant’s average weekly wage.
No. Unemployment benefits are available only if you are unemployed. Employees on FMLA through their employer are not unemployed.
Yes.
Yes.
We are working as quickly as possible to process a record number of claims. Once your application has been processed, you will receive a determination. The determination will state whether you qualify for benefits. If you qualify, and if you chose direct deposit, your first payment will be deposited into your account within a few business days. If you chose debit card, it will take a few days longer. All benefits will be retroactive to the date you first qualified. Remember that to receive payments, you also must file weekly claims.
Oklahoma
Agency Phone Number Website
Oklahoma Employment Security Commission 1-800-555-1554 https://oesc.ok.gov/
The OESC Service Call Center is experiencing extremely high call volume and long wait times due to this unprecedented COVID-19 situation. We appreciate your patience. You can file a claim on line quickly and access self-service features by clicking the “Claimant Access” link at Unemployment.ok.gov. When you file your claim you will be asked information about your separating employer. There is a “get matching names” function that will attempt to identify your correct employer so the notice goes out correctly. Please use this function to find your employer and send the notice to their address of record. Failing to do this requires staff to re-mail the notice to the address of record, which could slow down the processing time for your claim.

In addition to finding the correct employer, if your separation was due to the business closing or reducing hours due to COVID-19, please mark your reason of separation as a lack of work.
In an effort to protect the safety and well-being of our employees the Oklahoma Employment Security Commission has made the difficult decision to close public access to all OESC State Administrative Offices and Local Oklahoma Works American Job Centers. OESC staff are working remotely to maintain and provide essential services. We encourage all customers to use the online tools available below. We ask for your patience as we strive to serve our fellow Oklahomans as well as keeping our employees safe.
Due to the impact that the Coronavirus has had on our nation, the Oklahoma Employment Security Commission (OESC) is utilizing social distancing practices to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 in Oklahoma. OESC is unable to properly sanitize workforce center equipment/computers nor possess the ability to provide proper personal safety equipment to our customers or employees. OESC's first priority is your health and the safety of your family and our leadership team made the decision to prevent possible exposure of COVID-19 to our customers and employees. Please note that our staff is processing claims and performing our normal job duties remotely in order to continue to serve you.
At the current time, we are monitoring the situation and will make adjustments to our operations as we need to for the health and safety of our staff and the citizens of Oklahoma.

Updates will be made to our website at ok.gov/oesc and our local Facebook pages as updates are made.
As information becomes available we will post it to our website and to our local Facebook pages.
At the present time we are not encouraging anyone to go into public to obtain internet access if you do not have it at your house; be aware and use discretion when making this decision for yourself and your family.
You may call 1-800-555-1554 to speak with a representative regarding filing a claim by phone.
Unemployment insurance is a temporary income intended for individuals who have experienced a loss of work due to no fault of their own when suitable work is not available. It is an insurance paid by employers.
The first step is to file an Initial Claim. You do this by going online to https://unemployment.state.ok.us. You should then register and prepare a resume on OKJobMatch.com.

Email a copy of two forms of identification (one must be a photo ID) to IDVerification@oesc.state.ok.us. Your claim will be effective the Sunday during the week in which the claim is filed. Next you must file weekly claims each week you wish to claim benefits (starting immediately). The weekly claim is a series of questions you must answer which will determine if you have met the eligibility requirements for the week you are filing.
No. At this time the OESC has waived the work search requirement due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Since the required number of work search contacts is zero, individuals should respond “yes” when asked if the required number of work search contacts have been made when filing a weekly claim for benefits.
No. The Governor has signed an Executive Order waiving the waiting period. All claims filed with an effective date of 3/15/20 or later will have the waiting period waived as long as the order remains in effect.
An Unemployment Insurance benefit debit card will be issued to you at the time your first eligible week processes. It normally takes between 7-10 days to receive the card. Do not throw the debit card away. You have two options to receive unemployment insurance payments. You may receive your payments via the prepaid debit card or you may direct transfer the payments from the prepaid debit card into your own U.S. banking account, for no fee.

To receive payments to the debit card, you must activate the card by following the instructions sent with the card. To set up this recurring direct transfer, you must activate your card and then visit www.goprogram.com or call 1-866-320-8699 and use the automated system to enter your banking information.

If you wish to set up direct deposit without activating your card, you must visit www.goprogram.com. If you have previously been issued a debit card for payment within the past three years, your payment will be issued to that debit card unless otherwise specified. If you no longer have your previously issued debit card, please contact our payment processing vendor at 1-866-320-8699.
An Unemployment Insurance benefit debit card will be issued to you at the time your first eligible week processes. It normally takes between 7-10 days to receive the card.

Do not throw the debit card away. It is valid for three years. If you have previously been issued a debit card for payment within the past three years, your payment will be issued to that debit card unless otherwise specified. If you no longer have your previously issued debit card, please contact our payment processing vendor at 1-866-320-8699.
Unemployment insurance is a temporary income intended for individuals who have experienced a loss of work due to no fault of their own when suitable work is not available. It is an insurance paid by employers.
A claim for unemployment benefits may be filed by visiting unemployment.ok.gov and clicking the “Claimant Access” link or "Continue" button.
The separating employer is the most recent employer for whom you have worked 15 days or more. This applies to individuals who are temporarily laid off and to those who have completely separated from employment.
You can access information about your claim by visiting unemployment.ok.gov and clicking the “Claimant Access” link or "Continue" button. You will find information regarding recent activity, monetary entitlement, and determinations of eligibility.
Oklahoma’s maximum weekly benefit amount (WBA) for the year 2020 is $539. The amount that an individual qualifies for is based on wages earned from covered employers during the base period.

The base period is the first four of the last five completed calendar quarters. You can access information about your claim by visiting unemployment.ok.gov and clicking the “Claimant Access” link. You can find information regarding recent activity, monetary entitlement, and determinations of eligibility.
The amount you may receive weekly is one twenty-third (1/23) of the highest quarter of taxable wages in your base period not to exceed the maximum weekly benefit amount allowed by Oklahoma law. Taxable wages are those wages during your base period that are subject to unemployment tax. This is a tax paid by your employer and is not taken from your paycheck.

If monetarily eligible, the weekly benefit amount will not be less than $16.00 nor more than the maximum allowed by law. In 2020 the maximum WBA is capped at $539.00. For example, if during your base period, your highest calendar quarter of taxable wages was $14,000, your weekly benefit amount would be $539. (Using this rule, $14,000 ÷ 23 = $608.70. The maximum benefit amount allowed by law for 2020 is $539, since $608.70 exceeds that amount, your weekly benefit amount would be $539.).
You may file a weekly claim by visiting www.unemployment.ok.gov and clicking the “claimant access” link or by calling 1-800-555-1554 and select the option to file a claim. During this crisis, the governor has waived the job search requirement, please answer “yes” when asked if you have done your work searches so there will not be an automatic stop put on your claim for responding “no.”
The U.S. Department of Labor has established the timeliness standard of 21 days for a determination of eligibility. Please note that the 21 day time-frame is calculated from the day a claim becomes monetarily eligible.
There are no extensions at this time, but if Congress enacts an extension (EUC) or disaster unemployment assistance (DUA) we will provide details on our web site.
You may file a claim upon separation from employment. However, you must report the details of the severance package when filing your initial claim. A determination will be made as to whether or not the severance payment is deductible from your unemployment benefits.
here is a fourteen day grace period to file a weekly claim. Weekly claims must be filed within fourteen days of the week ending date to be considered timely. Claims which are filed untimely may not be paid.
Anyone who is unemployed may file a claim for unemployment. When filing your initial claim, you will be asked to provide the reason for separation from your last employer of 15 days or longer. If you were discharged or fired, an issue (hold) will be placed on your claim until a determination of eligibility is made by the Commission.

An individual shall be disqualified for benefits if he or she has been discharged for misconduct connected with his or her last work. The applicable law regarding this topic can be found in the Oklahoma Employment Security Act under Section 2-406.
No. Social Security is not deductible from unemployment benefits.
When filing your initial claim you will be asked to provide the details of your retirement or pension. A determination will be made as to whether or not the retirement or pension payment is deductible from your unemployment benefits. Please note that Social Security does not need to be reported as retirement income.
To stop your claim, simply discontinue filing weekly claims. No additional payments will be made.
To cancel your claim please submit a copy of your Social Security card and government issued ID, along with a written statement detailing the reason for the request. You may fax the request to 405-962-7524.
Anyone who is unemployed may file a claim for unemployment. When filing your initial claim, you will be asked to provide the reason for separation from your last employer of 15 days or longer. If you quit or resigned, an issue (hold) will be placed on your claim until a determination of eligibility is made by the Commission.

An individual shall be disqualified for benefits for leaving his or her last work voluntarily without good cause connected to the work, if so found by the Commission. There are certain provision for leaving work due to compelling family circumstances. Additional information regarding this topic can be found in the Oklahoma Employment Security Act under Sections 2-404 and 2-210.
Please continue trying. Due to the volume of claims being filed, there will be some disruptions.
Most typos will not affect the claim. You can disconnect and save the application and come back to it, but if the claim is not stored by Saturday at midnight, it will be erased.
We have a team of around 40 individuals who are reviewing issues on a daily basis and deleting or releasing any that were added in error. Other issues must go to adjudication staff for review. There will be issues that must be adjudicated and this process may take several weeks to have the issue reviewed. Please continue to file your weekly certifications, but you do not need to call in.
Photo IDs can be emailed to IDVerification@oesc.state.ok.us. Proof of Income/Employment can be faxed to 405-962-7524.
Claim weeks must be filed and benefits must be paid in order to have a balance on the card. In some instances, individuals are receiving the card before any weeks have been claimed. You can look online at www.goprogram.com to check on your payments.
Check with the debit card vendor at www.goprogram.com or call 1-866-320-8699.
Oregon
Agency Phone Number Website
Oregon Employment Department 1-877-345-3484 https://secure.emp.state.or.us/ocs4/
The CARES Act legislation provides an extension to regular benefits called Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC).

This extension is effective the week starting March 29, 2020 and ends December 26, 2020. This extension adds 13 weeks of benefits to a regular claim for those that are eligible.

There are two ways to be eligible.
  • Option 1:
    • Your claim balance is $0,
    • Your claim has not yet expired, and
    • You do not have a regular claim available in another state, Canada, or through another federal program.
  • Option 2:
    • Your last valid claim expired July 6, 2019 or later, and
    • You do not have a regular claim available in Oregon, another state, Canada, or through another federal program.
We are working to implement this extension into our systems as soon as possible. Once done, we will notify everyone by mail who may qualify. If you were eligible for PEUC for weeks that have already passed, we will apply the extension to the first week you became eligible.

In the meantime, follow these instructions:
  1. Continue to make weekly claims for weeks that you are requesting unemployment benefits, and
  2. If your address has changed, update your address with us. You can do this by using the Online Claim System and select the option to change your address or by calling your local WorkSource Oregon office.
Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation (FPUC) is a program that provides unemployment assistance to you in addition to other unemployment benefits you are eligible to receive. FPUC will be automatically paid if you receive your normal unemployment insurance benefits and will be paid as a separate payment at the same time as your other unemployment benefits. FPUC is payable for weeks claimed beginning Sunday, March 29, 2020 through the week ending July 25, 2020.
You need to apply for Unemployment Insurance benefits to be eligible to receive the $600 weekly Pandemic Unemployment Compensation. We are currently implementing the programming into our system, and expect to begin processing the additional $600 benefit payments to those currently eligible for regular UI benefits by Friday, April 10.
As long as a person’s unemployment is connected to the COVID-19 pandemic, temporary benefits can be made available to self-employed individuals, independent contractors, and “gig” economy employees. They also will be eligible to receive the additional $600 weekly Pandemic Unemployment Compensation.
The CARES Act provides temporary benefits to individuals who were unable to start a new job or contract due to the pandemic.
Individuals now receiving Unemployment Insurance benefits will begin to see the benefits in their accounts by the week of April 13. The benefit period is March 29, 2020-December 31, 2020.
States no longer will be penalized during this crisis for waiving the one-week waiting period. Oregon has not waived the one-week waiting period because the technical, computer changes needed to waive the week could actually result in a delay of benefits.
No. Workers receiving those funds are not eligible for Unemployment Insurance benefits.
UI benefits may be available to those who are on a temporary layoff. These benefits occur for claimants whose employer stops operation for a short period of time, such as cleaning following a coronavirus exposure or by government requirement. Workers can get UI benefits, and do not need to seek work with other employers. You must be able to work, stay in contact with your employer, and be available to work when called back.
If your employer expects to re-open in the future, you do not actively have to look for another job to receive benefits. To get benefits, you must:
  • Be able to work;
  • Stay in contact with your employer; and
  • Be available to work when your employer calls you back to work.
If you are not still in contact with your employer, you are currently considered to be actively seeking work if you are doing what you can to be prepared to return to new work or find new employment
  • Note that when filing an online claim, our systems require you to enter your work search. You can bypass this by marking the temporary layoff option.
  • During your temporary layoff period, please keep a written work search log in case it is requested in the future.
Yes. A person will be considered available to work if they are:
  • Quarantined by their health care provider, or by advice issued by public health officials to self- quarantine due to possible risk of exposure to, or spread of, the novel coronavirus, but they are not sick;
  • Home sick because of the novel coronavirus or a condition with similar flu like symptoms and they have not turned down an offer of work since they began being at home due to the sickness; or
  • Hospitalized, or in other institutionalized care, due to the novel coronavirus, but for less than half of the week, and they did not turn down an offer to work that week.
Generally, you will not be eligible for benefits if your employer is paying you to remain away from the site or as stand-by pay.
You may be eligible for benefits. You can file a claim, and the Employment Department will gather information from you and your employer to see if benefits would apply.
Generally you will not be eligible for unemployment benefits. You can file an initial claim to determine the possibility of receiving benefits.
The Oregon Bureau of Labor and Industries issues guidance related to Oregon’s sick time and other leave time laws.
Contact the Workers’ Compensation Division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services for information on filing a workers’ compensation claim related to coronavirus. They can also be contacted at 800-452-0288 or workcomp.questions@oregon.gov.
You will generally not be eligible for unemployment benefits if you quit your job. You can file still an initial claim to find out if you can receive benefits.
Generally, you will be eligible for unemployment benefits. To find out if you are eligible, file an initial claim. We will gather information from you and your employer about your circumstances to determine your eligibility.
Under the new federal CARES Act, Self-employed individuals are now eligible for benefits. The Employment Department will provide more information once we receive the required U.S. Department of Labor guidance. The Employment Department is currently reviewing all the new federal legislation and will provide more information once we receive the required U.S. Department of Labor guidance so that we can carry out these changes as quickly as possible.
Unemployment benefits may be available to school staff who are out of work due to the closure and are not actively seeking work with other employers. You must be able to work, stay in contact with your employer during the temporary layoff, and be available to work when called back. If your district spring break is during the closure other provisions may apply.
Generally, you will not be eligible for benefits during the normal spring break period if you are expected to return to your job after the break. You may be eligible and can file a claim for other weeks during the closure that are not part of your normal spring break.
Whether you are paid by the Department of Human Services, another agency, or an independent contractor, you can file a claim for unemployment benefits. The Employment Department will review each case and determine if you can receive benefits based on current law and the circumstances of the COVID-19 coronavirus.
The Oregon Employment Department provides Unemployment Insurance (UI) benefits to most workers who are out of work through no fault of their own. To get benefits, workers must meet some requirements. In general, to receive UI benefits for a week, you must be able to work, be available for work, and look for work you can do.

A person will be considered “actively seeking work” if they are willing to look for work when state and local emergency declarations related to the coronavirus expire or otherwise are no longer in effect.
Yes. A person will be considered “available to work” if they normally work less than full-time and are only available for less than full-time work.
If you are sick due to the coronavirus, you are likely not able and available to work. That would mean you cannot receive unemployment insurance benefits. Being able to work means that you are physically and mentally able to do the work you are looking for or usually do, unless:
  • You were sick or injured for less than half of the week; or
  • You have a long-term condition preventing you from working, but you can still do some work.
If you had an opportunity to work, but did not because you were sick, you likely cannot receive unemployment insurance benefits for that week, but may be eligible for benefits for other weeks.
Please call your local WorkSource Oregon center to ask about completing your appointments by phone or Skype.
Yes. If you are home because you are caring for a family member due to the effects of COVID-19, you are considered available for work and will want to report that on your weekly claim. If you are home solely because you lack child care for your child or children due to school or daycare closure, you are considered available for work and will want to indicate that on your weekly claim.
Generally yes, you would be considered available for work. If you have turned down work with a new employer, that could affect your benefit eligibility. You will still need to actively seek work, unless you are temporarily away from your normal job.
If at all possible we encourage you to go online to file a new claim or restart your existing claim. With the current climate our phone lines are busier than usual, we will check your situation and go back to the prior week when appropriate.
Through the CARES Act, the federal government temporarily will fully fund Oregon’s WorkShare program. This program seeks to prevent layoffs. Employers voluntarily make an agreement with the Oregon Employment Department to temporarily reduce employee hours and workers with reduced hours are eligible for partial unemployment.

More Info
The CARES Act provides federal funding to cover half of the costs of reimbursable benefits and provides additional flexibility for these entities to pay the other half over time. Workers for these entities are eligible for the weekly $600 Pandemic Unemployment Compensation.
Those workers may be able to receive Unemployment Insurance benefits. UI benefits may be available to those who are on a temporary layoff. These benefits occur for claimants whose employer stops operation for a short period of time, such as cleaning following a coronavirus exposure, or by government requirement. In these cases, employees expect to be back to work in four weeks or less. Workers can get UI benefits, and do not need to seek work with other employers. They must be able to work, stay in contact with you as their employer, and be available to work when you call them back to the job.
The Higher Education Coordinating Commission has rapid response services to plan for job transitions needed when a business closure or mass layoff occurs, including cases of natural and other disasters. Local Rapid Response teams coordinate with employer, worker representative, Trade Act and Labor.
Yes, anyone can file for Unemployment Insurance benefits. Currently excluded LLC members may elect coverage. Additional information is available from our Unemployment Insurance Tax division.
Yes, anyone can file for unemployment benefits. In this case LLC members could receive benefits if they meet all eligibility requirements.
The Employment Department has also created the OED_COVID19_Info@oregon.gov mailbox for coronavirus questions related to employer and job seeker programs and services.
Pennsylvania
Agency Phone Number Website
Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry 1-888-313-7284 https://www.uc.pa.gov/unemployment-benefits/

The Pennsylvania Department of Labor & Industry has asked us to update you regarding the processing of the significant number of unemployment compensation claim applications in their state due to the Coronavirus pandemic. As a change to the information previously provided, please note that if a worker is separated due to Coronavirus, employers will be not be charged for UC benefits, and relief from charge determinations will be issued automatically, although it may take more than the normal 90-day processing time for those determinations to be issued. In addition, we request that employers do not complete and return Request for Relief from Charges (UC-44FR) forms for any workers separated due to Coronavirus.

If a worker is separated due to Coronavirus, please continue to mark the claim separation in Data Element B-20 as a code 18 “Disaster Related Separation” and include information in Data Element B-33 “EmployerSepReasonComments” that the work stoppage is due to Coronavirus. This will protect your clients from incurring charges from the unemployment insurance claim.

If the worker is receiving any type of pay while off work, please also continue to include that information in Data Elements B-26.1 through B-26.7 to ensure proper unemployment compensation eligibility is determined.

Currently, there are no changes to the reasonable assurance provisions of the law.
If you are a school employee who is not working because of the COVID-19 emergency, you may be eligible for UC benefits for any week in which you would otherwise be working.

If the educational entity where you are employed is shut down by order of the Governor, "Lack of work" should be provided as the reason for separation.

Please note that your eligibility may end when the normal 2019-2020 school year ends and the summer period between school terms begins.
If you are a school employee who is working reduced hours because of the COVID-19 emergency, you may be eligible for UC.

If you are a salaried employee and continue to receive your regular salary payments and benefits during the COVID-19 shutdown, you are not considered unemployed, and should not file a claim for benefits.
No, you are not eligible for UC during a period of time when school is not in session due to a regularly scheduled holiday break or vacation period. If your school is currently closed due to the COVID-19 emergency, you may be eligible for UC; however, that eligibility may end when the normal 2019-2020 school year ends, and the summer period between school terms begins.

Eligibility for weeks filed beyond the end of the regularly scheduled academic school year will be subject to an investigation and will be denied if it is determined that the school employee has been given reasonable assurance of returning to work with the school employer for the following school term (2020-2021).
Yes. The fastest and easiest way is to file an initial claim online. After submitting your initial claim, you will receive a confirmation email with important details.

Effective March 16, 2020:
  • Work Search and Work Registration requirements are temporarily suspended for all UC claimants.
  • The Waiting Week requirement is also been temporarily suspended. This means that new claimants who are approved for UC benefits will receive payment for their first week of unemployment.
If approved, your first benefit payment should arrive within two to four weeks of filing your initial application. Payments are issued via a debit card or direct deposit.

You must continue to file your bi-weekly claim as directed in your "Claim Confirmation Letter" that you will receive in the mail, even if you are still waiting for your benefit eligibility to be determined. Familiarize yourself with all requirements to receive benefits from the UC program.

After receiving your PIN in the mail, you can go online to check the status of your claim and see when to expect your payment. Keep your PIN in a safe, easy-to-remember place.
If you are currently employed but have been directed by a healthcare provider, medical professional or public official to isolate or quarantine, you may be eligible for UC. Follow the instructions above to file an initial claim.

You may also be eligible for paid sick leave as provided under the federal Families First Coronavirus Response Act. Learn more at the U.S. Department of Labor website.

You should exhaust any paid leave available to you before filing a UC claim.

Before returning to work, please consult the PA Department of Health guidance on home isolation or quarantine and returning to work after COVID-19 exposure.
​You may be eligible and should file an initial claim online.
Yes, you may be eligible. The fastest and easiest way is to file an initial claim online. After submitting your initial claim online, you will receive a confirmation email with important details.

You may also be eligible for paid sick leave as provided under the federal Families First Coronavirus Response Act. Learn more at the U.S. Department of Labor website.

You should exhaust any paid leave available to you before filing a UC claim.

Before returning to work, please consult the PA Department of Health guidance on home isolation or quarantine and returning to work after COVID-19 exposure.
If you are no longer being paid, including using paid sick leave, you may be eligible for UC.
​If your business is still operating but you are unable to work due to COVID-19, you should exhaust any paid leave available to you before filing a UC claim. If your business is closed due to COVID-19, talk to your employer about use of paid leave vs. filing for UC.
  • Most paid leave will provide 100 percent of your usual pay, while unemployment benefits typically pay between 50 to 70 percent, depending on your circumstances.
  • Paid leave may be available immediately and allow you to keep receiving a paycheck; it typically takes two to four weeks to receive UC benefits.
  • You may file a UC claim if you know you will exhaust your paid leave. You must report all income received from any source, including paid leave.
More Info
​If your employer offers you telework and you are able to perform that work, you are not eligible for UC. However, if the telework your employer offers results in a reduction of hours, you may be eligible for UC benefits.
The CARES Act, signed into law on March 27, 2020, created Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA). PUA may provide paid benefits to an individual who cannot attend work or telework and who is the primary caregiver of a child or other person in their household who is unable to attend school or another facility that is closed as a direct result of the COVID-19 public health emergency and the school or facility is required for the individual to work.

Additionally, you may be eligible for paid sick leave or expanded Family and Medical Leave (FMLA) as provided under the federal Families First Coronavirus Response Act. Learn more at the U.S. Department of Labor website.
If you are not receiving pay or using employer-paid sick leave or time off, you may be eligible for UC benefits. You should file an initial claim online.

You may also be eligible for paid sick leave as provided under the federal Families First Coronavirus Response Act. Learn more at the U.S. Department of Labor website.

You should exhaust any paid leave available to you before filing a UC claim.

If you or your employer is unsure of your risk to COVID-19, the PA Department of Health has created a "risk assessment tool" to help businesses make decisions about operations and employee and customer safety during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Before returning to work, please consult the PA Department of Health guidance on home isolation or quarantine and returning to work after COVID-19 exposure.
​If you are out of work due to lack of work, you may be eligible for UC benefits. See Am I eligible for UC if I am out of work because my employer closed (temporarily or otherwise) because of COVID-19?" for more information.
​The following rules have been temporarily suspended due to Governor Tom Wolf's emergency declaration to make it easier to file for UC benefits:
  • Work Search and Work Registration requirements are temporarily suspended for all UC claimants. Claimants are not required to prove they have applied or searched for a new job to maintain their UC benefits. Claimants are also not required to register with PACareerLink.pa.gov.
  • The Waiting Week is temporarily suspended for all UC claimants. Previously, eligible claimants would not receive compensation for the first week of unemployment. Eligible claimants may now receive benefits for the first week that they are unemployed.
Under Pennsylvania's emergency rules currently in place due to COVID-19, the need for work registration and work search for UC benefit eligibility has been waived. You should continue to file your bi-weekly claims.
Please see L&I's Workers' Compensation information to learn more. You can also learn more on our Workers' Compensation COVID-19 FAQs.
Benefits are based on your reported earnings during the base year (the first four of the last five completed quarters). You must also have over 18 credit weeks (weeks during which you earned $116 or more) in your base year to be eligible.

Calculate Weekly Benefit Rate
​Eligible claimants typically receive their UC benefits in two to four weeks for their initial claim. Benefit payments are issued via a debit card provided by the UC office or through direct deposit.
​Yes, you may be eligible for UC. Your weekly benefit amount is based on the total wages, including tips, reported by your employer in the base year (the first four of the last five quarters).
The federal government passed the Families First Coronavirus Response Act on March 18, 2020. Individuals whose employers have fewer than 500 employees may be eligible for paid leave through this new law. Learn more at the U.S. Department of Labor website , which administers both programs.
Individuals applying for unemployment compensation benefits must be US citizens or lawful residents of the US, or have work authorizations to work in the US.
It depends upon whether your work is deemed essential or not and your medical risk. If you are in a population particularly susceptible to COVID-19 and are directed by a medical professional or government official to quarantine or self-isolate, you may be eligible for UC. You should first work with your employer to use any existing paid leave available.

If you or your employer is unsure of your risk to COVID-19, the PA Department of Health has created a "risk assessment tool" to help businesses make decisions about operations and employee and customer safety during the COVID-19 outbreak.
Depending on your situation, your employer may be able to terminate your employment if you do not report to work as required by the employer. Employment in Pennsylvania is “at-will,” unless you have a contract with your employer, or you are a member of a union with a collective bargaining agreement. If you are a member of a union, contact your union representative.
No. Individuals should file for UC the first week that their income has reduced. Do not apply in anticipation of a layoff or furlough, because your claim may be denied or delayed.
Every naturalized or authorized worker MUST email or mail legible copies of the front and back of their Social Security Card and Employment (Work) Authorization DocumentOpens In A New Window within 14 calendar days to be eligible to receive benefits.

If sending the documents via email, please send to greencard@pa.gov with the email subject as: First & Last Name.

If mailing, please mail to:
  • 651 Boas Street
    Central Office, Room 625,
    Attn: Jen M.
    Harrisburg, PA 17121
Employees who are unable to work due to COVID-19 are strongly encouraged to work with their employers to first exhaust any paid leave that is available. Your employees may be eligible for paid sick leave or expanded Family and Medical Leave (FMLA) as provided by the federal Families First Coronavirus Response Act. Learn more from the US Department of Labor, which administers both programs.

Paid leave is typically available immediately and pays the employee at a higher rate than UC, which may take two to four weeks to receive and may replace only 50 to 70% of typical pay.

Employees who do not have access to paid leave, or have exhausted their paid leave, may be eligible for UC.
​No, contributory businesses who are temporarily closed due to COVID-19 will be granted Relief From Charges, and your tax rate will not be increased because of COVID-19-related claims.
Your employees should first use paid sick leave or paid time off, and they may be eligible for new paid sick leave and expanded Family and Medical Leave (FMLA) as provided by the federal Families First Coronavirus Response Act which is administered by the US Department of Labor. Find out more about the federal Families First Coronavirus Response Act here.

If they are not receiving paid time off, they may be eligible for UC benefits.

If you are unsure of your employees risk to COVID-19, the PA Department of Health has created a "risk assessment tool" to help businesses make decisions about operations and employee and customer safety during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Before they returning to work, you and your employees should consult the PA Department of Health guidance on home isolation or quarantine and returning to work after COVID-19 exposure.

For more information on operating your life-essential or waiver-approved business during the COVID-19 pandemic, please see the PA Department of Health guidance for business operations during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Your employees should first use paid sick leave or paid time off, and they may be eligible for new paid sick leave and expanded Family and Medical Leave (FMLA) as provided by the federal Families First Coronavirus Response Act which is administered by the US Department of Labor. Find out more about the federal Families First Coronavirus Response Act here.

If they are not receiving paid time off, they may be eligible for UC benefits.

If you are unsure of your employees' risk to COVID-19, the PA Department of Health has created a "risk assessment tool" to help businesses make decisions about operations and employee and customer safety during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Before they returning to work, you and your employees should consult the PA Department of Health guidance on home isolation or quarantine and returning to work after COVID-19 exposure.

For more information on operating your life-essential or waiver-approved business during the COVID-19 pandemic, please see the PA Department of Health guidance for business operations during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Yes.
Your employees should first use paid sick leave or paid time off, and they may be eligible for new paid sick leave and expanded Family and Medical Leave (FMLA) as provided by the federal Families First Coronavirus Response Act which is administered by the US Department of Labor. Find out more about the Families First Coronavirus Response Act here.

If they are not receiving paid time off, they may be eligible for UC benefits.

Before they returning to work, you and your employees should consult the PA Department of Health guidance on home isolation or quarantine and returning to work after COVID-19 exposure.

For more information on operating your life-essential or waiver-approved business during the COVID-19 pandemic, please see the PA Department of Health guidance for business operations during the COVID-19 pandemic.
The Shared-Work program can help keep employees attached to your workplace by allowing an employer to temporarily reduce work hours rather than resorting to layoffs. You can reach the Shared-Work team at sharedwork@pa.gov.

However, if you are a business that has had to close either temporarily, consider layoffs, or is financially at-risk for permanent closure the Rapid Response Assistance Program is available to assist you with a variety of services and resources to help you and your employees. You can reach the Rapid Response team via email at RA-LI-BWPO-Rapid@pa.gov.

Additional resources for businesses are available through the PA Department of Community and Economic Development.
If you earn your primary income from working in your own business or farm, you may be eligible for Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA), which was created as part of the federal CARES Act that became law on March 27, 2020. The Department will provide information about how to apply for PUA on our website as soon as it becomes available.

PUA is a separate program from regular UC. Small business owners and self-employed individuals are not eligible for regular UC.

Small businesses may qualify for a small business loan through the PA Department of Community and Economic Development, or for other programs available through the Small Business Administration including the Paycheck Protection Program.
​Yes, if your employees are temporarily laid off due to a business downturn or closure as a result of COVID-19, they may be eligible for UC benefits.

If you are experiencing a business downturn, you can use L&I's Shared-Work program to avoid employee lay-offs. Additional resources for businesses are available through the PA Department of Community and Economic Development.

However, if you are a business that has had to close either temporarily, consider layoffs, or is financially at-risk for permanent closure the Rapid Response Assistance Program is available to assist you with a variety of services and resources to help you and your employees.
No, those employers who did not elect and pay the solvency fee by the due date will not be eligible to request relief from charges for benefits with an AB date in 2020.
You can:
  • Reimbursement of benefit charge payments paid during the weeks of the disaster declaration related to COVID-19 pandemic has been extended to 120 days from the date of the billing statement, or
  • If you are unable to pay within 120 days, please contact us to discuss repayment options
    • The best way to contact us is by logging into your account your account at www.uctax.pa.gov
    • Select Inquiries from the menu
    • Select Submit Inquiry
    • Choose COVID-19 from the subject list
Note:
  • Interest will begin to accrue effective January 1, 2021.
  • Reimbursement of benefit charges not related to the COVID-19 pandemic will continue to have a due date within 30 days of the billing statement.
Self-employed individuals, including individuals whose primary income comes from their own business or farm, may be eligible for unemployment benefits through the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) program.

If you are not regularly eligible for UC, you should NOT file a claim through the traditional UC system; rather, please file a claim for PUA benefits.
To our knowledge, there is no change in the allowance of a business continuing to pay health care benefits to employees on a temporary layoff. Please refer to the Labor Law and Compliance FAQs under COVID-19.
Beginning the week that ends April 4, 2020 and all eligible weeks through July 25, 2020, individuals will receive the extra $600 FPUC for all weeks they receive UC or Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) benefits.

UC claimants should now be receiving the FPUC payments, which are paid approximately one week after regular UC benefits are paid. Once the PUA Program is making payments, FPUC payments will be made retroactively for any backdated weeks of benefits for weeks ending April 4, 2020 and later. The $600 per week will be separate payments from your bi-weekly benefit.
Individuals will receive the $600 FPUC for all weeks they receive unemployment and PUA, beginning the week that ends on April 4, 2020, and all eligible weeks through July 25, 2020. This includes individuals who have been filing for unemployment.

UC claimants should now be receiving the FPUC payments, which are paid approximately one week after regular UC benefits are paid. Once the PUA Program is making payments, FPUC payments will be made retroactively for any backdated weeks of benefits for weeks ending April 4, 2020 and later. The $600 per week will be separate payments from your bi-weekly benefit.
The $600 will be paid weekly and will be a separate payment from your bi-weekly benefit.
Yes, all individuals who are eligible and receive regular UC or PUA will receive the $600 FPUC per week.
The extra $600 FPUC per week will not affect eligibility for Medicaid or CHIP.

Please note that the extra $600 FPUC per week will affect eligibility for SNAP.
We are still awaiting guidance on any effects FPUC may have on other forms of public assistance, including TANF.

Once implemented, the $600 FPUC payments will be backdated to all eligible weeks for which individuals claim UC or PUA beginning the week ending April 4, 2020 and will be paid for all eligible weeks claimed through July 25, 2020.
Yes. All individuals collecting regular UC or PUA are eligible for the $600 per week.
No. If your employer offers you work, you must accept that work or you may no longer be eligible for UC. If you return to work at reduced hours, and this results in a reduced weekly income compared to your weekly income prior to filing for UC, you may be eligible for partial UC plus the $600 FPUC per week.
Yes, FPUC is taxable and will be subject to 10% Federal Withholding Tax, if you elected to have taxes withheld from your regular UC or PUA benefits. For information about changing your election visit our Taxes on Benefits page.
Rhode Island
Agency Phone Number Website
Rhode Island Department of Labor and Training 401-243-9100 http://www.dlt.ri.gov/ui/

For all separations related to COVID-19, all Rhode Island needs is for integrated partners to use Code 18 "Disaster Related Separation" in B-20. No comments are necessary

You may be eligible:
  • If you have been laid off, or your hours have been reduced, you may be eligible for regular unemployment insurance.
  • If you are an independent contractor, gig worker, self-employed, or a small business owner, you may be eligible for Pandemic Unemployment Assistance, the new federal program that expands unemployment insurance eligibility to individuals who are not ordinarily covered by the regular UI program.
  • If you were denied regular unemployment insurance because of monetary ineligibility (i.e. insufficient qualifying wages/inconsistent employment history), you may be eligible for Pandemic Unemployment Assistance.
  • If your place of employment remans open, but you are unable to work as a direct result of COVID-19, you may be eligible for unemployment compensation, if and only if, you can demonstrate good cause for voluntarily leaving your job when work is available.
Please apply on our online at dlt.ri.gov. Those applying for regular unemployment insurance should apply via our standard application, found here.

Those applying for emergency benefits through Pandemic Unemployment Assistance should file here.
Most Rhode Island workers, on payroll, are covered by UI. Employer payroll taxes fund UI for all private, for- profit businesses. Public sector workers and employees of non-profit organizations are covered as well; however, their employers may opt to pay claims directly instead of contributing via payroll taxes. Business owners most likely qualify if they are also on payroll.
Normally independent contractors and self-employed individuals would not be eligible to collect, but as a result of recently passed federal legislation, those workers should apply for unemployment compensation through Pandemic Unemployment Assistance here.
You should file for unemployment insurance in the state in which you work. Here are the websites for our neighboring states’ unemployment insurance applications:
If your hours are reduced, you may be eligible for partial benefits if you are being paid less than what your weekly Unemployment Insurance benefit amount would be if you were to be totally unemployed. Those applying for regular unemployment insurance should apply via our standard application, found here.
If you are working full-time, you are likely ineligible for Unemployment Insurance.
To qualify for regular unemployment insurance, you must have been paid at least $12,600 in either your base period or an alternate base period. Normally, your base period consists of the first four of the last five completed calendar quarters before the starting date of your new claim. If you did not earn this amount, you may be eligible if you meet all of the following conditions:
  1. You were paid at least $2,100 in one of your base period quarters, and
  2. You were paid total base period taxable wages of at least one and one-half times your highest single quarter earnings, and
  3. You were paid total base period taxable wages of at least $4,200.
Also, if you have had a previous claim, you must have worked again since filing that claim and must have been paid taxable wages of at least eighty times the R.I. minimum hourly wage of $10.50, or $840.
Your weekly benefit rate will be equal to 3.85% of the average of the total wages in the two highest quarters of the base period, not to exceed the defined maximum amount. Effective 7/1/19, the minimum is $53 and maximum is $586, not including dependency allowance. Your weekly benefit rate remains the same throughout your benefit year.

If you have dependent children under 18 years of age you may be entitled to a dependency allowance. Children with disabilities over the age of 18 may also qualify for the allowance. The dependency allowance is limited to 5 dependents and is equal to 5% of your weekly benefit rate for each dependent. There is a $15 minimum per dependent.
Every claimant receiving unemployment compensation will receive an additional $600 per week through the end of July 2020. However, if a claimant is working part time and they do not receive their weekly benefit amount because they earn more in wages, they also will not be paid the additional $600 that week.
You should still apply for UI; there’s no penalty for applying. Fill out the online application and DLT will let you know for sure.
You should not call the call center to check on the status of your claim. If you received a confirmation number, then your claim has been received and is being worked on. The UI team will reach out directly if they need any more information from you. Please allow the lines to be open for people with urgent issues that the UI team will need to address.
If you have a confirmation number, your claim has been received and is being worked on. You should not reapply as this might further delay your payment. For some context, there are two paths a claim can take. If the claim is straightforward, it might be processed automatically.

That can take as little as 24 hours. If it needs any kind of staff review (for complex employment history or sources of income, for example), it will take more time – typically 7-14 days. The UI team will reach out directly if they need any additional info, and you will receive an email as soon as your claim has been processed. Again, please refrain from calling the call center to check on the status of your claim.
There are several reasons a decision on your claim may be delayed:
  • Confirming out of state wages – if you have worked out of state, we must request your wage records from that state, which can slow down the processing.
  • Alternate calculation of benefits – if you do not have qualifying wages in the standard “base period,” we will run an alternate calculation or even wait to the start of the next quarter to review new wage records.
  • Errors on the initial claim – A typo on your date of birth or social security number may delay processing.
  • Adjudication – if there are questions about your reason for separation, or other details of your claim, a staff member may request additional information or an interview to determine your eligibility
You will receive your BYE (Benefit Year Ending) number as soon as your claim has been processed. You will not need it before that.
Once you've filed a UI claim, you must certify for your weekly benefit payment every week you are unemployed or under-employed. You will only be paid for the weeks in which you certify for your payments. You can certify your payments online using UI Online or by calling 401-415-6772.

When you initially file, you will have the option to select your payment method, either direct deposit or electronic payment card (EPC). We strongly recommend payment via direct deposit to reduce delays in receiving your benefit. Once a payment has been authorized, it is generally deposited in 48 hours.
Check your claim status page or mailings from the Department. Make sure that 1) your claim has been processed and 2) you’re in the correct date range to begin using UI Online. If your claim hasn’t been processed, or you’re not in the right date range, then you will just need to wait for the claim to process or for the right date; you do not need to call.
If you are out of work due to COVID-19 and planning to return to the same employer, then the work search is waived. But if you were already unemployed, then you must still conduct the work search.
South Carolina
Agency Phone Number Website
South Carolina Department of Employment and Workforce 1-866-831-1724 https://dew.sc.gov/individuals/apply-for-benefits/claims-process

“We have been in contact with the South Carolina Department of Employment and Workforce regarding the significant number of unemployment insurance claim filings in their state due to COVID-19. We are sending this communication to ensure all TPAs report any separations for work through SIDES the same way to ensure eligibility for an unemployment insurance beneficiary is not interrupted and an employer is not charged for UI benefits claimed as a result of this situation.

If a worker is separated due to COVID-19, mark the claim separation in Data Element B-20 as a code 18 “Disaster Related Separation” and include information in Data Element B-33 “EmployerSepReasonComments”

If the worker is receiving any type of pay while off work, please also include that information in Data Element B-33 “EmployerSepReasonComments” to ensure proper unemployment insurance eligibility is determined.”

Yes, unemployment benefits are available to individuals who are unemployed through no fault of their own. If an employer must shut down operations and no work is available, individuals may be eligible for unemployment benefits.
Yes, unemployment benefits are available to any individual who is unemployed through no fault of their own. If an employer must lay off employees due to the loss of production caused by the coronavirus, individuals may be eligible for unemployment benefits.
Yes, unemployment benefits are available to any individual who is unemployed through no fault of his/her own. If an employer reduces the number of hours an employee works, individuals may be eligible for unemployment benefits.
No, if an employee is receiving paid leave they would not be considered unemployed and therefore ineligible for unemployment benefits.
No, South Carolina law allows for the removal of charges from contributory employers when unemployment benefits are paid as a result of a natural disaster, either declared by the President of the United States or the declaration of emergency by the Governor.
Under the CARES Act, there are three programs that are coming to South Carolina, expanding benefits and providing additional financial relief to the good people of our state.

Since receiving the guidance from the Department of Labor, we have been working tirelessly with our vendor partner to expedite the massive system upgrades and changes that are required to accept the following temporary federal programs.

In an effort to expedite the process and put money into your pockets, we’re rolling out the program in phases and we’re committing to paying out the benefits prior to receiving the federal funding for these programs.

Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation (FPUC) will provide an additional $600 per week, in addition to normal unemployment insurance benefits, to eligible claimants. We will begin making payments by the week ending April 18.

Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) provides compensation for individuals who weren’t previously found eligible for unemployment benefits. We anticipate being able to accept claims for PUA no later than the week ending April 25.

Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) will provide up to 13 additional weeks of benefits to those who have already exhausted their standard state UI benefits of 20 weeks. We anticipate being able to accept and process PEUC claims in the coming weeks.
If you have exhausted your regular UI benefits, you could be eligible for Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) which would allow for an additional 13 weeks of benefits. At this time, the system will not allow an extension to be filed due to the system enforcing the standard 20 weeks of benefits ruling. You do not need to file an appeal. Once the PEUC is activated, as per DOL guidance, we will retroactively pay out benefits.
Individuals who do not have a sufficient wage history to meet the regular state UI monetary requirements may be eligible for PUA (Pandemic Unemployment Assistance) if they were separated as a direct result of COVID-19.
You should report the actual wages you earned for the period you are being asked about. Individuals who do not have a sufficient wage history to meet the regular state UI monetary requirements or who were scheduled to start a job but couldn’t due to COVID-19, may be eligible for PUA (Pandemic Unemployment Assistance) if they were separated from employment, or could not start employment, as a direct result of COVID-19.
Eligibility for benefits can only be determined after you have filed a claim for benefits. There are several factors that affect your eligibility for benefits. They include but are not limited to your wages during the base period, your reason for separating from your employer, your availability to work, and more.

The CARES Act provides PUA, which expands the pool of potentially eligible Claimants as follows:
  • Individuals who file a 1099 o Self-Employed Individuals o Church Employees
  • Independent Contractors o Gig Economy Workers
  • Claimants who have exhausted their regular UI Benefits
The CARES Act also provides for FPUC, which allots $600.00 weekly in Emergency Increase in Unemployment Compensation Benefits.
Due to volume of claims, please allow up to 21 days to process your claim; however, if you are deemed eligible, your benefits will be paid retroactively to the week you filed your claim.
Once we have received your claim, part of the eligibility process includes confirming with your employer that you worked for them and that you were laid off or had reduced hours from your job. By state law, the employer has 10 days to respond. If the employer does not respond within 10 days, the pending issue is removed from the claim in order to proceed with processing.
When you initially file your claim, and it is being processed by staff, you will see an ISSUES DELAYING PAYMENT banner listed on the Claimant Homepage of your portal – this is standard.
If you see a “PENDING RESOLUTION” issue, you do not need to do anything additional at this time.
If you see a “SSA VALIDATION” issue in this section, do not worry, this will resolve itself automatically.
Our agency is working to process all waiting week waivers as soon as possible. If you see your first weekly certification was processed as a waiting week, you do not need to contact us to have it corrected. You will see an update as soon as this process is completed by our agency.
The work search requirement is waived until further notice, so you may disregard the instructions on completing this task as outlined on the website; however, you must still complete your weekly certifications confirming your continued lack of work. Employment and Workforce may choose to reinstate this requirement and will notify you if that is the case.
If you worked out-of-state and have received a notice in the mail or your portal says your claim is zero, this means we are still waiting on wage verification from the other state. If you are unsure if the out-of-state employer was attached to your claim, we can escalate you to a claims-taker.
Once you have created an account in the Claimant Self Service Portal, you can log in to check the status of your claim or visit us at dew.sc.gov under the individuals tab. Below is a link regarding frequently asked question about managing your benefits. More Info
While an individual can be eligible for UI benefits through their own claim or that of their employer, Employer Filed Claims are more convenient as they eliminate the need for employers to certify an individual’s claim. By filing on their behalf, the employer is essentially certifying during the claims’ process.

For regular UI, employees included in an Employer Filed Claim are exempt from weekly work searches, but any claimant who has lost work due to COVID-19 is excused from the weekly work searches, whether the claim is filed by the employer or the claimant.
On the agency’s website, go to the Filing Claims for Your Workers: Employer Filed Claims tab located in the Employer drop down menu. The link to the portal is #1 on that page.
The employer must wait until the end of the week of layoff before they can file the claim. And they must file within 14 days of that date. Please note that the longer an employer waits to file, the longer it takes the workers to receive their benefits payment.
An employer is filing in arrears of the work week. Much like a paycheck is compensation for the prior week of work – UI benefits are paid for the prior week of unemployment rather than in anticipation that someone won’t be working.

In addition, it helps prevent accidental fraud. For instance, if a worker is laid off on Monday, they could potentially get part-time work on Tuesday which might affect eligibility of the UI claim.
Overall, if an individual is eligible, the average time to receive payment is 7 to 10 days once a claim has been filed. The agency’s system has recently been modernized to ensure the fastest automation on our end; however with the influx of claims, payment could take up to 21 days.

There are many variables that affect this question. Such as:
  • When the employer files the claim.
  • How quickly the worker certifies the claim.
  • Eligibility status.
  • When an employer responds to separation information.
  • And more.
Individuals need to create an account in the MyBenefits Portal and certify the claim each week. This is called Weekly Certification.

If the employee is new to the system they will click the “I am new here. I need to Register Now!” This is a two-step process:
  1. Creating their credentials (username and password).
  2. And then logging into the system using their new credentials and creating an account.
If the employee has applied for UI before, they should use their username and password to login and certify. If they do not remember their username and password they SHOULD NOT create a new account. Instead, they should click “Forgot your username/password?”
It means you are confirming that the information submitted by your employer is correct and that you should receive the UI benefits for that week. An employee cannot certify for the week until the employer has submitted the claim on their behalf for that week.

An employee has up to two weeks after the employer submits the weekly claim to certify, but this will delay your UI benefits payment – the payment will not be initiated by the system until you certify for the week.
No, you have to wait until after the employer has submitted the claim on your behalf for that week. You have up to two weeks after the employer submits the weekly claim to certify, but please be aware that the payment will not be initiated by the system until you certify for the week.
When an employee files, the worker must first file their claim and then wait for the employer to respond about why there was a lay off or reduction in hours. Then eligibility is determined and if eligible, the claimant receives the UI benefit payment. However, when an employer files, they submit their claim and eligibility is determined then, after the claimant certifies that they are unemployed and reports any wages, if any, earned for the week, and then the claimant receives their payment.
South Dakota
Agency Phone Number Website
South Dakota Department of Labor and Regulation 605-626-3179 https://dlr.sd.gov/ra/individuals/file_claim.aspx
Reemployment assistance benefits provide temporary assistance to eligible workers who are unemployed through no fault of their own and are either looking for full-time work or awaiting recall to employment. They are not based on financial need.
No. Reemployment assistance benefits are paid by your employer through taxes on your wages. Nothing is ever withheld from your paycheck to pay for reemployment assistance benefits.
Log in and apply for benefits online or call the Claims Call Center. (Persons with hearing or speaking impairments can call the Relay Service of South Dakota at 800.877.1113) 8:00 a.m. to 4:20 p.m. (CST) Monday through Friday.
You should file a claim for benefits on or after your last day of work. A claim filed on a Sunday is effective that Sunday, and a claim filed on Monday through Saturday is effective on the Sunday preceding the date the claim was filed.
You will need the following information to file:
  • Social Security Number
  • Driver’s license number or other state identification number
  • Your employment history for the last 18 months, including business names, complete addresses and phone numbers of all employers
  • The name and local number of your union hall, if you obtain work through the union
  • Your Alien Registration Number if you are not a U.S. Citizen
  • Your SF-8 and SF-50 forms if you are a federal employee
  • Your DD214 if you served in the military
Yes. A notification of claim is sent to the employer requesting verification of the dates of employment and the reason you separated.
In order to be eligible for benefits you must meet the following requirements:
  • You must be partially or totally unemployed through no fault of your own.
  • You must have sufficient wages in the base period to establish a monetary entitlement.
  • You must be a US citizen or legally authorized to work in the US.
  • You must be able and available to accept work.
  • You must be actively seeking work, unless we’ve told you otherwise.
  • You must be registered with your states designated workforce agency.
This list does not include all of the eligibility requirements. Your eligibility is determined based on your specific situation.
Your first payment can take up to four weeks after the claim is filed. The first eligible week of your claim is a non-paid waiting week.
You can expect to receive payment for an eligible weekly request for payment within two business days of filing your weekly request for payment.
Your benefits will automatically be direct deposited to a Way2Go Card Debit Mastercard. Direct deposit is also available upon request. To enroll in direct deposit, either complete the direct deposit enrollment form located on the back side of the Reliacard information sheet included separately in your claimant packet, or log on to the website and select the “Change Payment Method” option.
Yes. The Reemployment Assistance Division will notify you when you file your claim if you are required to search for work by making a minimum of two job contacts each week. You will be required to provide your job contact information when you file your weekly request for payment. Your reported job contacts are subject to verification.

If you are exempt from having to search for work due to being on recall to return to work for your employer, you MUST notify the department of any changes in your recall status. If you are no longer on recall to go back to work for your employer, you must reopen your reemployment assistance claim immediately to receive the proper work search instructions.
You can receive reemployment assistance benefits if the department determines your schooling or training does not interfere with your availability for full-time work. If you are attending classes or receiving training, this information must be reported.
Generally, reemployment assistance benefits are only available to persons who have become unemployed through no fault of their own. Eligibility for reemployment assistance benefits can only be determined once the claim is filed and facts are obtained from you and your former employer.
Your determination notice will explain how and when to appeal if you disagree with a decision. Read these decisions carefully and timely as your appeal rights expire within 15 days.
Yes. Federal Internal Revenue Service (IRS) income-tax law does not require us to withhold taxes from your weekly reemployment assistance benefits. However, you may choose to have 10 percent of your weekly benefits deducted for income-tax purposes.

Both you and the Internal Revenue Service will receive a year-end statement (Form 1099-G) in January, indicating the total amount of RA Benefits paid to you for the previous calendar year. The total also includes benefits you may have paid back because of an overpayment.
Contact our Customer Service department at 605.626.2452.
Yes. All new and acquired businesses in South Dakota are required to register with the Reemployment Assistance (RA) Tax Unit. Registration is also required for an existing account if the entity or ownership of the business has changed. For example, a sole proprietorship forms a partnership or a partnership forms a corporation.
It is your responsibility to complete a registration form. You may register online at Register Your Business, or forms are available online on our Forms page. You can also obtain a form by calling the Reemployment Assistance Tax Division at 605.626.2312.

Most businesses need to complete a Registration Form 1. Special registration forms are also available for 501(C)(3) organizations (Form 1NP) and political subdivisions (Form 1PS).

If you are a domestic employer and want to report annually, submit Form DE - Domestic Employer Application to Report and Pay Annually - by December 31st to be effective the following calendar year.

To submit your completed form by mail:

Reemployment Assistance Division - Tax Unit
SD Department of Labor and Regulation
P.O. Box 4730
Aberdeen, SD 57402-4730

Or fax it to:
605.626.3347

It is important that you complete all information on the registration form. Incomplete registrations will be returned. This will delay processing time and may cause your taxes to become delinquent.
Employers are subject to reemployment assistance (RA) tax if they meet one of the following criteria:
  • Employed one or more individuals (full- or part-time) in 20 different calendar weeks in the current or preceding calendar year;
  • Paid wages of $1,500.00 or more in a calendar quarter in the current or preceding calendar year;
  • Are covered under Federal Unemployment Tax Act (FUTA) and unemployment insurance laws of another state;
  • Acquired all or a portion of a covered business;
  • Paid wages for agricultural employment of $20,000 or more in a calendar quarter or employed 10 or more individuals for some portion of a day in each of 20 different calendar weeks in the current or preceding calendar year;
  • Paid wages for domestic employment of $1,000 or more in a calendar quarter in the current or preceding calendar year; or
  • Have proof of 501(c)(3) non-profit status with IRS and employed four or more individuals in 20 different calendar weeks in the current or preceding calendar year.
South Dakota residents who work for you in South Dakota (regardless how long they work for you) and out-of-state employees working in South Dakota more than 90 days should be reported to South Dakota. Out-of-state employees working in South Dakota fewer than 90 days should be reported to your home state.

South Dakota residents who work in another state should be reported to the state where the work is being performed, not South Dakota. If their work is not localized in one state, such as truck drivers and salespeople, they should be reported to the state where they receive their direction and control. Do not report based on residency. Report based on where the work is being performed.
Yes. In most cases, paying state reemployment assistance actually works to your advantage. If you are current with your state reemployment assistance (reports and taxes), you are allowed to take a credit against your federal unemployment. This credit reduces the federal unemployment you pay from 6.0% to 0.6%.
If you register online, you will receive your account number and tax rate immediately if you are subject to the tax.

Registration forms submitted by mail, fax, e-mail, or in-person can take approximately two to three weeks to assign an account number and tax rate. This information will be mailed to you along with a Notice of Liability in a new employer's packet.
If you are submitting a registration now, but realize that you were liable for previous quarters you should either:
  • Print the Quarterly Wage Report and mail it along with your registration. See the tax rates tables below for the correct tax rate to use.
  • Call the Reemployment Assistance Tax Unit at 605.626.2312 to have a report faxed or e-mailed to you.
  • Fax a request to the Reemployment Assistance Tax Unit at 605.626.3347 to have a report faxed to you.
  • Contact your local Tax Representative using the contact information on our field locations page.
If you wait to have the wage report mailed to you with an account number, you may incur additional penalties and interest.
Employers must report all wages paid to each employee in each quarter on their quarterly reports; however, tax is only assessed on each employee's wages up to the annual taxable wage base per calendar year. Individual employee wages greater than the annual taxable wage base are considered "excess wages" (i.e., wages in excess of the employee's annual base wage).
Taxable Wage Base*
2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 & after
$9,500 $10,000 $11,000 $12,000 $13,000 $14,000 $15,000
*All rates and wage bases subject to change by the South Dakota Legislature.
Services performed by an individual for remuneration is covered employment unless the following two conditions are met, per South Dakota Codified Law 61-1-11:
  • The worker is free from control or direction of the performance of the contract for services, and
  • The worker must be engaged in an independently established trade, occupation, or business.
For more information on determining whether an individual is a contractor or employee, see the Independent Contractor vs. Employee Fact Sheet (Adobe PDF format).
Yes. South Dakota statute requires all employment be reported, regardless of length of employment.
Corporate officers are considered employees for reemployment assistance tax purposes. When a shareholder employee of a corporation provides services to the corporation, reasonable compensation generally needs to be paid. Reasonable compensation to shareholder employee(s) must be declared before a non-wage distribution may be made to that shareholder employee. This compensation is subject to reemployment assistance taxes.
For each employee, you should have the following records:
  • Full name and social security number;
  • Places of work within South Dakota;
  • Date hired, rehired, or returned to work after temporary or partial layoff;
  • Date of termination of employment;
  • Information covering the termination, including if the termination occurred by voluntary action of the individual, or by discharge, and complete reason for the termination;
  • The cause of all time lost due to unavailability for work occurring within any week;
  • Hours worked and wages earned in each pay period, and the total wages for all pay periods ending in each quarter of the year, including the cash value of the other remuneration, and the amount of all bonuses or special commissions;
  • Hours worked and wages earned in exempt employment.
All wages are to be reported in the calendar quarter they are paid to the worker.
Yes. You have the option of paying your amount due using Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT) when you report online. EFT payments are only accepted at the time you file your quarterly report.

Credit Card payments are accepted for outstanding debts, but cannot be used when filing your quarterly report.
The state of South Dakota does not recognize common paymasters (related corporations or companies reporting all payroll under one account). Although the federal government does recognize common paymasters, South Dakota requires that each entity file its own reports. A company may not include wages from a number of entities under one account.
No. We are a state agency and do not have the federal unemployment forms (Form 940). You must contact the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). They may be reached at 800.829.4933 or through a local IRS office. All IRS forms are also available on their website at www.irs.gov. They will also be able to answer any questions you have on these forms.
Starting in 2009, employers with an experience rating account which has a negative balance may be assessed interest on the negative balance.

Background
In 2006, the South Dakota Legislature adopted a comprehensive package to put the South Dakota Unemployment Insurance Trust Fund on a path to improved solvency. One of the pieces was an assessment of interest on experience-rating accounts that have maintained a negative balance.

The South Dakota Unemployment Insurance Trust Fund is held by the U.S. Treasury, where it earns interest. In 2007, the average interest earned was 4.82 percent. The South Dakota Legislature decided that employers whose experience-rating account balances were negative and had become more negative compared to the balances as of December 31, 2006 will be charged interest equivalent to the interest rate earned by the Trust Fund.

Details
For those employers whose experience-rating account has had a negative balance at the end of each quarter for the last two calendar years and whose balance is more negative now than it was as of December 31, 2006, their account will be assessed interest at a rate equal to the rate the U.S. Treasury pays on the Trust Fund.

During February of each year, those employers will receive notice of interest due. The interest is payable in four equal payments due on the last day of each quarter. Effective July 1, 2011, this interest payment is credited to your Unemployment Insurance Experience-Rating Account. Negative account balances prior to December 31, 2006 will be not charged.

Example
If your account balance at rating time for the 2009 tax rates is a negative $2,000 and if your account balance on December 31, 2006 was a negative $1,000, you will pay interest on the $1,000 difference. The average 2008 interest rate earned by the Trust Fund (4.78 percent) times $1,000 equals $47.80. Rate schedules for employers who maintain a positive account balance will not change.
Tennessee
Agency Phone Number Website
Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development 1-877-813-0950 https://www.tn.gov/workforce/unemployment.html
Your stimulus check (up to 1,200.00) from the IRS is NOT CONSIDERED REPORTABLE INCOME. You do not need to include this money as earned income when you do your weekly certifications.

Check the website at www.tn.gov/workforce. If you believe you may be eligible for Pandemic Unemployment Assistance go ahead and file your claim.
Anyone may file a claim, but keep in mind that the basic eligibility requirements are that you have been separated from your job through no fault of your own and that you are able and available to return to work or accept suitable employment if offered.

If you fail to return to work or accept suitable work when offered you are no longer eligible for unemployment benefits. Any benefit you collect after refusing work will result in an overpayment and must be paid back. Refer to the "How to File" article on the helpdesk at lwdsupport.tn.gov.
No, if your employer filed an employer mass filed claim also known as a partial claim, the state has all your information. Log into Jobs4TN.gov to monitor your claim and do your weekly certifications by answering a few questions. If you are not sure please ask your employer to avoid confusion and delays.

No, if your employer filed an employer Partial/Employer filed claim, the state has all your information. Log into Jobs4TN.gov to monitor your claim. If you are not sure which list your employer filed, please ask to avoid confusion and delays.
It depends on how the furlough will affect your pay:
  • If the furlough is fully paid furlough the answer is no.
  • If your pay was cut or eliminated the answer is yes.
Reduced hours might qualify someone for unemployment. We recommend that you go ahead and file the claim.
  • If you are still making more money than what your “Weekly Benefit Amount” (as listed on your monetary determination letter) then simply do not certify as they are still considered employed.
  • If you are making less than your Weekly Benefit Amount, then certify each week on Jobs4TN, report the earnings and the system will adjust your benefit.
Exactly the same answer as above. Filing the claim and getting that monetary determination is the key. A person has done nothing wrong by just filing so they get that information to see. If they don’t ever certify the claim is never really truly activated.
At the present time, the state making changes to the system to accommodate the provisions of the Act and begin paying qualified claimants. More information will be provided as soon as it becomes available. Check the website at www.tn.gov/workforce. If you believe you may be eligible for Pandemic Unemployment Assistance go ahead and file your claim.
Yes, visit www.tn.gov/workforce/unemployment or search Google for “Tennessee Unemployment”
We cannot help you at this call center. We encourage you to find a family member or friend to help you file your claim online. If that's not an option, advise them to contact the Customer Service Center at 844-224-5818. Call wait times are high so it may take longer for someone to get back with you to file the claim with you.
You should ask your separating employer what state your wages were reported and file with that state.
Social Security Number, a Jobs4TN username and password (created during the claim process), basic personal information, employment history dates and wage amounts, bank routing number (if choosing direct deposit to receive benefits). Military, farm work, workers’ compensation, child support, and public assistance programs (like TANF and SNAP/Food Stamps) questions.
Check for typos in your Social Security number that you used when filing the claim.

Reset your password by clicking "Forgot Username/Password" on the home page on Jobs4TN.gov. If this doesn't work, leave a message with the CST Team at 844-224-5818 or email them at lwd.support@tn.gov to request a password reset. Then wait for an agent to reach out for assistance. An instruction page on resetting your password can be found here.
If you are separated from your employer due to a temporary shutdown or due to the Coronavirus, you can select “Lack of Work” as the separation reason. Please make sure you enter the last date you physically worked as your last day.
Yes, if you meet the eligibility requirements. To file a claim click here.
Yes. Under provisions of the CARES Act and Governor Lee’s executive order #15, being quarantined by a medical professional is a compensable separation, provided that you also meet all other eligibility requirements.
No, if you have already applied for Tennessee unemployment the additional benefit will be added when the funds become available and the changes to process these payments have been made.
The CARES Act will provide benefits to those who qualify for Pandemic Unemployment Assistance which is similar to Disaster Unemployment Assistance. The Federal CARES Act provides additional Unemployment Insurance (UI) benefits to Tennesseans impacted by the COVID-19 health emergency. The new federal law provides:
  • Pandemic Unemployment Assistance - Can provide 39 weeks of eligibility for individuals who have traditionally been ineligible for UI benefits, if they meet requirements. (Self-employed, gig workers, independent contractors)
  • Pandemic Unemployment Compensation - An additional $600 per week, on top of regular benefits, to all UI recipients; and,
  • Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation - Can provide an additional 13 weeks of UI benefits to eligible claimants.
Individuals are eligible for PUA if they do not qualify for regular UI benefits (including self-employed workers and independent contractors) and cannot work because they:
  • Are diagnosed COVID-19 or have COVID-19 symptoms and are seeking diagnosis;
  • Have a member of the household who is diagnosed with COVID-19;
  • Are providing care for a family or household member diagnosed with COVID-19;
  • Are the primary caregiver for a child whose school or care facility closed, due to COVID-19;
  • Are unable to reach their place of employment due to an imposed quarantine, or because advised by medical provider to self-quarantine, due to COVID-19;
  • Were scheduled to start new employment and cannot reach the workplace as direct result of COVID-19;
  • Became the major breadwinner because the head of household died from COVID-19;
  • Quit their job as a direct result of COVID-19;
  • Had their place of employment closed as a direct result of COVID-19; or
  • Meet any additional criteria specified by U.S. Secretary of Labor.
Individuals are not eligible for PUA if they can telework or are receiving paid sick leave or other paid leave benefits (regardless of meeting a category listed above).

To apply for PUA, claimants will need to file an unemployment claim on Jobs4TN.gov or call (844) 224-5818. Filing online is the fastest, most efficient way to receive your benefits. Due to high call volume, you will experience extended wait times when applying by phone.
Yes, the employee should file his/her Current Employment Status as “Temporary Layoff with Recall”, as long as all other eligibility requirements are met. Their weekly benefit amount is determined based on wages earned in a 4 quarter based period.
If you do not submit an employer-filed mass claim (also known as a partial claim), each of your employees will need to file individual claims which will take much longer to process. If you do not file an employer-filed claim, please provide each separate employee with a completed separation notice. You can find the fillable form here.
This is the preferred method if your business has not yet closed and you believe you will reopen. If you are uncertain of a reopen date, enter 16 weeks from the date of filing. Employers provide a list of employee names and required information to file a claim on behalf of employees. Instruct employees not to file an individual claim and that they will need to certify each Sunday to be paid in a timely manner.

More Info
All lists are effective on the date they are submitted. However, as you might expect, we are experiencing unprecedented numbers, and delays may be longer than usual. When an employer submits a spreadsheet to the Partial.Claims@tn.gov email account, they receive an auto-response letting them know that it was received and they will be notified via email once it has been successfully uploaded.
A confirmation email will be sent when complete.
Yes, as long as the employee did not file on their own, prior to the spreadsheet being uploaded.
Yes
It depends on how much they earn. If they are earning more than $275/week, they would be “in excess” and not eligible for additional benefits. The best thing to do is to go ahead and file the claim. At the end of the filing, claimants can check their claim summary or message center to see the monetary determination letter.
As few as one.
Yes, they can use any application they have that is similar to excel and we can convert it here.
It is recommended to call the 615-770-1712 or they can provide a new spreadsheet with the new extended dates listed. It is always recommended for the employer to file with the full 16 weeks listed.
Yes, WARN regulations have NOT been waived so all statutes still apply. However, because of the language in the statute and to the unexpectedness of this pandemic the 60-day provision would not apply.
Should be part of normal procedures but based on the company’s policy, but if they are continued to be paid, they will not need to file unemployment.
USERRA laws that govern recalls still apply.
You would need to contact the Bureau of Workers’ Compensation at 800-332-2667 (within Tennessee) or 615-532-4812.
Register on Jobs4TN.gov. Go to https://www.tn.gov/workforce/covid-19/jobs.html for more information.
Other than the normal process through Jobs4TN, or now the TN Talent Exchange, there is no mechanism to provide a list. WARN information will not be distributed to staffing companies.
It is encouraged to pay the employee; otherwise, they would be eligible to file unemployment.
That depends on guidance from USDOL and the CARES Act.
The department cannot bar anyone from applying for unemployment benefits. However, when a claim is filed the employer is notified and has seven days to respond to the claim. If the employee resigned, or quit, the employer should respond accordingly and provide the facts to the department.
The $600 comes directly from the Federal government, in the form of the stimulus package for each state to distribute. Each state is awaiting final guidance/interpretation from USDOL. It